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ENTERTAINMENT
By TAMI LUHBY and TAMI LUHBY,NEWSDAY | January 31, 2000
No more waiting in long lines to pick up tickets at theaters or sports arenas. Beginning in April, Ticketmaster-Online CitySearch Inc. will allow customers to print tickets ordered online. The tickets, bought via www- .ticketmaster.com, can be printed on any laser, inkjet or high-end dot matrix printer at home or work. No special software will be required. "This is an exciting way to make ticket buying more convenient," said Tom Stockham, executive vice president of ticketmaster.com. Printed on a standard sheet of paper, the tickets come with a bar code that specifies event information and seat location.
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BUSINESS
Staff Reports and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Ironmark, a printing and image consultant company that was formed through the 2011 merger of Frank Gumpert Printing and Corporate Printing Solutions, announced Monday it will consolidate its Annapolis and Hunt Valley operations into a new headquarters in Howard County. In a news release, company officials said Ironmark's 110 employees will relocate to a 50,000-square-foot facility in Annapolis Junction by Oct. 8. The move comes three years after Frank Gumpert Printing, in Annapolis, and Corporate Printing Solutions, in Hunt Valley, merged to become CPS Gumpert.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 19, 1995
NEW YORK -- At the request of Attorney General Janet Reno and the FBI, and with the concurrence of the New York Times, the Washington Post today is publishing the unaltered 35,000-word manifesto of the serial killer known as the Unabomber in the hope of ending his 17-year campaign of murder through the mails.The bomber offered last June to stop the killing, though not necessarily the property damage, if the text of the manifesto, calling for a revolution against the industrial-technological underpinnings of society, was published by one of the two newspapers within three months, and if three annual follow-up messages were printed.
HEALTH
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
Three months ago, Cindy Colvin could barely walk. Shopping sprees to feed her "first addiction, retail" were out of the question, as were the essentials - getting groceries, tending to household chores and making it into work. "I didn't know how to walk anymore," said Colvin, 55. "I wasn't walking like a normal person. Just to take a step, every single step, was agony. " With knees so swollen she "couldn't remember normal" and a constant throbbing throughout both legs, the Avondale, Pa., resident drove an hour and a half to Baltimore to see OrthoMaryland's Dr. Barry Waldman, who promised a new life made possible by 3D printing.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen | October 20, 1991
Susan Meller began collecting what she calls throwaway art in the 1970s. Passionate about old textiles, she went to farm sales and auctions to buy box lots of scraps and hopelessly damaged quilts. "I'd bring them home and put them in the dryer to get the dust out. I wouldn't wash them for fear they'd run, and then I'd spend hours with a razor liberating the pieces I liked and giving them a new life," said Meller over coffee recently.Before she knew it, Ms. Meller had a large selection of three generations of printed quilting pieces.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | March 6, 1995
Who hasn't cleaned out an old storage carton and discovered a crumbling newspaper folded in the bottom?Forget the news stories contained on the browning pulp pages. It's the ads for the $12 topcoats at Brager-Eisenberg's that claim attention.In this light, about 2,000 persons with a similar passion for ancient advertisements, old roadside signs, posters and penny post cards filed through an exhibition hall at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium this past weekend for the Baltimore Paper Show.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | September 19, 1990
MOSCOW -- A unique Russian voice, its uncompromising tone familiar from long ago, yesterday joined the tumultuous debate going on here about the economic and political future of the Soviet Union.And though dispatched from the exiled writer's Vermont hideaway, the arguments of Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn fit surprisingly smoothly into the Moscow discussion.For the first time in nearly three decades, Mr. Solzhenitsyn, 72, a towering figure in 20th-century Russia, directly addressed the Soviet public on a current political topic through an official publication.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen,Solis-Cohen Enterprises | May 24, 1992
Ephemera. It sounds contagious. You've been exposed to it all your life. Your friends and neighbors have it too. Is it chronic?Chances are, after seeing "Graphic Americana: The Art and Technique of Printed Ephemera," an eye-catching and nostalgic exhibition at the Princeton University Library in Princeton, N.J., through Sept. 20, you'll succumb to the ephemerist's bug; taking out the trash will never be the same.Ephemera is printed paper and packaging not meant to last. It is yesterday's invitations, last year's calendar, business cards, cigar bands, advertisements, postcards, brochures, posters, matchbooks and other items that make good barbecue tinder or overflow your wastebasket.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kate Seago and Kate Seago,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 19, 2000
Trends analyst Arnold Brown chuckles when someone mentions the paperless office. "I think we'll see it with the Second Coming," he says. "The paperless office is going to require a massive mutation of the human species. We need to have paper; we need hard copy." In the late 1970s and early '80s, "paperless office" and "office automation" were major buzzwords. Newspapers, magazines and trade journals used up forests writing about how computers would make the printed word obsolete. Some office gurus predicted that secretaries and clerks would become as obsolete as hatpins and that file cabinets and in-boxes would become museum curiosities.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 10, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Every day, with the blessing of U.S. officials, Iraqi government printing presses produce 4 million portraits of Saddam Hussein. Hussein is rendered in purple ink against a filigreed pink and blue background, in a pose reminiscent of George Washington. One difference is that he is depicted wearing a business suit and striped tie. The portraits, printed by the mint, are on Iraq's 250-dinar notes, probably the most widely circulated paper currency in Iraq. The reasons the United States has been forced to approve mass-produced portraits of this country's fugitive leader while offering a $25 million reward for his capture suggest how complicated the reconstruction of the country now seems.
BUSINESS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
When Gene Shirokobrod's patients started asking the doctor of physical therapy to come home with them, he decided to find a product to recommend as an alternative for help with back and neck pain. But he couldn't find any product he thought was good enough to recommend, so he set out to make something. Shirokobrod reached out to Corey Fleischer, a mechanical engineer and co-founder of the Baltimore Foundery, to help him create the ARC, a product to relieve back and neck pain and retrain muscle.
NEWS
May 27, 2014
The Sun's recent editorial about the tea party's fortunes helps everyone understand why dinosaur media outlets are circling the drain toward oblivion ( "Weakened tea," May 21). In the view of some, every political issue fits into file folders - Fox News Channel or MSNBC, the Wall Street Journal or the New York Times, the tea party or the GOP establishment. The Sun derides me for filling in on conservative talk radio. But it is not conservative talk radio or Fox News that declared bankruptcy or sees its audience decline year after year.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
John Danko got his Baltimore company's first 3-D printer four years ago, and he said it's given him a front-row seat for a manufacturing revolution. In an office across the street from the foundry where Danko Arlington's molten metal flows, he prints out the industrial patterns he said he could no longer find skilled workers to do by hand. Employees designing products on computers use the technology to spit out prototypes more quickly. Some see in this the potential for a change as substantial as the Industrial Revolution - a different way of making things that could kick-start tiny operations, disrupt entire industries and literally transform the landscape.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 4, 2014
Why did you do it?" The movie opens with that question. In response, Jayson Blair makes a joke. "This one again," he mutters, rolling his eyes in mock consternation at the predictability of it. But predictable as it is and as long as he's had to ponder it, Mr. Blair still ends up punting. "I don't have a good answer for the question," he acknowledges. "A Fragile Trust: Plagiarism, Power and Jayson Blair at the New York Times" -- it premieres this week on PBS; check your local listings -- reintroduces us to the central figure in one of the great media scandals of all time, the one-time wunderkind who lied and plagiarized his way through a career on what is arguably the greatest stage in American journalism, The New York Times.
NEWS
April 2, 2014
Tucked in a corner of The Sun's excellent "Orioles Preview" section was a piece from The Sun's owner, The Chicago Tribune, predicting a last-place finish for the O's. This is in stark contrast to the Yankee-loving New York Times which wrote "Don't be surprised if the Orioles turn out to be the best team in the league. " They went on to laud the Birds' offense, pitching, defense and coaching. I will go with the world's newspaper of record. Tom Wilcox, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Frank J. Antonelli, a retired Government Printing Office printer and proofreader, died March 17 of cancer at Lorien Mays Chapel and Skilled Nursing Home. He was 84. Frank Joseph Antonelli was born and raised in Brooklyn, N.Y., where he graduated from public schools. He attended Pace University. Drafted into the Army in 1950, Mr. Antonelli served with an infantry unit and participated in the successful Inchon landing in September 1950, when United Nations forces under the command of Gen. Douglas MacArthur successfully pushed North Korean forces back across the Yalu River.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Crossman and Craig Crossman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 12, 2003
Is paper dying? As a columnist, I've been receiving an alarming number of similar questions from people in all sorts of businesses, educators and even social groups. It seems they share a frustration in trying to communicate using paper. In fact, printing anything on paper these days just doesn't seem to have the communications impact it used to have only a few short years ago. Perhaps it's a byproduct of our electronic age. More and more of us are corresponding via e-mail and seeing everything via the Internet.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | April 24, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Russian newspapers do a rotten job covering women, Maxwell McCrohon was saying. And, the Western image aside, they're not all dowdy mopes in babushkas, staring at empty grocery shelves."
NEWS
March 21, 2014
2014 Baltimore Sun Peeps Recipe Contest OFFICIAL RULES NO PURCHASE IS NECESSARY. The Baltimore Sun Peeps Recipe Contest (the “ Contest ”) is sponsored by Peeps and the Baltimore Sun. Contest is offered only in the Maryland and is subject to all federal, state and local laws. Entry deadline is March 31, 2014, at 5:00 p.m. Sponsor's computer is the official time-keeping device for this Contest. By entering, you agree to these Official Rules. Eligibility . To enter, you must be at least 18 old or older and resident of Maryland.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
A Russian newspaper editor was fined Wednesday for printing a quote indicating that being gay was normal. English translations of the contentious quote differ - Gay Star News went with "My very existence is proof being gay is normal" while the Associated Press uses the clunkier "My existence itself is effectively evidence of homosexuality's normalcy. " Words aside, the quote caused complaints when it was published in a Khabarovsk newspaper in September. The suggestion that gay and straight relationships were equal was enough for editor Alexander Suturin to be punished for violating Russia's ban on "propaganda of non-traditional sexual relations.
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