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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | December 1, 2006
Edward Alexander Griffith III, a retired commercial real estate broker and appraiser who was active in Baltimore County politics and earned decorations as a World War II bombardier, died of sepsis Monday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Ruxton resident was 84. Born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park, he was a 1942 graduate of Boys' Latin School. He joined the Army's Air Corps and became a bombardier on B-24 Liberators. He flew 52 combat missions, including the celebrated raids on the Ploesti oilfields in Romania.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Donald C. Allen, a retired corporate lawyer who was a founder of the Baltimore law firm of Allen, Thiebolt and Alexander, died Thursday at his home in Jackson, Wyo., of pancreatic cancer. He was 82. The son of Donald E. Allen, a meat inspector, and Alice Diediker Allen, a homemaker, Donald Clinton Allen, the first of six children, was born and raised in Spokane, Wash., where he graduated in 1950 from John Rogers High School. Mr. Allen entered Princeton University in 1950 and withdrew three years later.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1999
PRINCETON, N.J. -- Peter Singer is the very picture of the avuncular professor. The gracious, soft-spoken manner, the corduroys and roomy sweater, the wispy gray hair and hopelessly unstylish oversized eyeglasses. It just happens that some folks make him out to be a monster.The trouble is that the newly appointed Princeton University philosophy professor doesn't believe in the sanctity of human life or in several other views cherished in the Judeo-Christian tradition.Singer says, for example, that parents of a severely disabled newborn should, if they so choose after consulting doctors and if willing adoptive parents cannot be found -- be allowed to kill their baby.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
Robert Lenox Dwight, a retired engineer who founded the National Electronics Museum and was active in the Assateague Coastal Trust and the Cylburn Arboretum, died of pneumonia March 22 at Baywoods of Annapolis. He was 91 and had lived on Gibson Island. Born in New York City, he was the son of Maitland Dwight, an attorney, and Lydia Butler Dwight, a homemaker. After graduating from Phillips Exeter Academy, he entered Princeton University in 1941. Following Pearl Harbor, he enlisted in the Navy and entered its V-12 education program.
NEWS
March 30, 2008
ROBERT FAGLES, 74 Translator of literary classics Robert Fagles, whose bold, flowing translations of Homer and Virgil made him a best-selling classical scholar, died of prostate cancer Wednesday in Princeton, N.J., Princeton University said Friday.
NEWS
June 14, 1995
A Today section article on June 7 about the Lancers Boys Club included incorrect information about the educational background of A. B. Krongard, a former club member and chief executive officer of Alex. Brown & Sons. Mr. Krongard is a graduate of Princeton University.The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,dick.irwin@baltsun.com | October 13, 2009
A 23-year-old man who collapsed and died Saturday during the Baltimore Marathon was a graduate student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Boston Globe and The Daily Princetonian reported Monday. Peter Norman Curtin, a native of Wilmington, N.C., was among some 20,000 runners Saturday when he collapsed about 11:20 a.m. near the 25-mile marker on Guilford Avenue and near the course's last medical station. He was taken by a private ambulance to Union Memorial Hospital and pronounced dead at 1:11 p.m. Debra Schindler, a hospital spokeswoman, said Curtin never regained consciousness.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | July 6, 2005
Frederick Theobald Wehr, a retired development director for the old Church Home and Hospital and a part-time aviator who once flew under the Bay Bridge, died of cancer Monday at his Roland Park home. He was 79. Born in Baltimore and raised in Ruxton, he was a 1943 graduate of the Gilman School. He enrolled at Princeton University but almost immediately entered the Navy's accelerated officer training program and spent three years in the Navy during World War II, serving as the navigator on the Herbert J. Thomas, a destroyer in the Pacific.
NEWS
December 24, 2006
The Battle for the Soul of Capitalism By John C. Bogle There is no one better qualified to tell us about the failures of the American financial system and the grotesque abuses that have taken place in recent years than John Bogle, who as founder and former chief executive of the Vanguard mutual funds group has seen firsthand the innermost workings of the financial industry. "This is an important book for the post-Enron era. In his characteristic hard-hitting style, one of the legends of the mutual fund industry presents an insider's view of what's wrong with corporate America and what can be done to improve it," said Burton G. Malkiel, Princeton University.
NEWS
March 8, 2001
Sarbanes to be speaker at Democratic dinner U.S. Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes will be the keynote speaker at the Carroll County Democratic Central Committee's annual Jefferson Jackson Dinner on Saturday. The dinner will be held at 6:30 p.m. at Wilhelm Ltd. Caterers on Route 140, Westminster. Tickets are $25 in advance and $30 at the door. Sarbanes began his political career in the Maryland House of Delegates in 1966. He served three terms in the U.S. House of Representatives before being elected to the Senate in 1976.
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2013
In the summer of 2008, When Leora Friedman was 15 and her sister Ariela was 19, the sisters led a song-writing workshop for patients and families of the Hackerman-Patz House, a Baltimore residence for children receiving limb-lengthening surgery at Sinai Hospital. Working with a $500 grant from the Johns Hopkins University, the Friedman sisters donated instruments, wrote songs and performed with the seriously ill youngsters. The result was an album, "A Friend Like You," filled with original songs.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2013
The University of Maryland, College Park was included on a list of the "Top 25 LGBT-Friendly Colleges and Universities" released by national advocacy group Campus Pride Tuesday. The university was the only Maryland school to make the list, which was initially published by Huffington Post's Gay Voices section. Campus Pride's list looks specifically at colleges' policies toward and institutional support of LGBT students in areas like housing, campus safety, counseling and student life.
NEWS
August 14, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley on Wednesday appointed Anne E. Hoskins, an executive with a New Jersey-based energy company, to the powerful board that regulates utility rates in Maryland. Hoskins, a Baltimore resident, would fill the vacancy left on the Public Service Commission when Kevin Hughes was named chairman of the agency. If confirmed by the Senate, her term would continue until June 2016. In a statement. O'Malley said Hoskins would help protect the interests of Maryland families.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
Augustine H. "Humpy" Stump Jr., a retired Baltimore insurance executive who had been president of Stump, Harvey & Cook Co. Inc. and an active churchman and volunteer, died Sunday of complications from a fall and pneumonia at Springwell, a Mount Washington senior-living community. He was 87. "He was smart, worked hard and liked people," said his brother, Dawson Stump of Owings Mills, who had been vice president and secretary at Stump, Harvey & Cook. "He had a great outgoing personality and liked the job and worked hard at it. " Augustine Herman Stump Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised in Owings Mills.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2012
David K. Reeves, a retired development director and fox hunting enthusiast, died Nov. 23 of a stroke at Princeton Hospital in Princeton, N.J. The former Baltimore resident, who lived in Princeton, was 86. The son of an insurance executive and horseman and a homemaker, David Kenny Reeves was born in Baltimore and raised in a home on Greenway in Guilford. He attended Gilman School and graduated in 1944 from the Canterbury School in New Milford, Conn. He served in the Army Air Forces at the end of World War II. Mr. Reeves entered Princeton University at the end of the war and earned a bachelor's degree in history in 1949.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
Dr. James Roncie Duke, a retired ophthalmologist and Johns Hopkins pathologist who was a collector of F. Scott Fitzgerald's works and lived in what once was the novelist's Baltimore home, died of complications from dementia Oct. 16 in Bolton Hill. He was 88. Born in Tampa, Fla., he was the son of an ophthalmologist. He attended Plant High School in Tampa and was a 1942 graduate of Staunton Military Academy in Virginia. In an autobiographical essay he wrote for a 50th class reunion at Princeton University, he said, "I wanted a change of scene from the South" when he applied to college.
NEWS
February 19, 1997
Chien-Shiung Wu,84, a physicist who worked on the Manhattan Project and later conducted a landmark experiment in physics, died of a stroke Sunday in New York. Born in Shanghai, Ms. Wu came to the United States in 1936 and received her doctorate in physics from the University of California at Berkeley. She went on to teach at Smith College and Princeton University.In the 1940s, Wu worked on the Manhattan Project, a covert project to build an atomic bomb in World War II. She joined Columbia University after the war and taught there for more than three decades.
NEWS
April 20, 2003
Earl King, 69, a prolific songwriter and guitarist responsible for some of the most enduring and idiosyncratic compositions in the history of R&B, died Thursday of diabetes-related complications. Over his 50-year career, Mr. King wrote and recorded hundreds of songs. His best-known compositions include the Mardi Gras standards "Big Chief" and "Street Parade"; the rollicking "Come On (Let the Good Times Roll)"; and "Trick Bag," the quintessential New Orleans R&B story-song. In his prime, he was an explosive performer, tearing sinewy solos from his Stratocaster guitar and wearing his hair in an elaborate, upraised coif.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2011
John Sampson Toll, a gifted physicist and founding chancellor of the University System of Maryland, died Friday of heart failure at the Fox Hill assisted-living Facility in Bethesda. He was 87. Dr. Toll, an indefatigable worker who led three institutions of higher learning in his six decades in education, was credited by friends and colleagues with bringing national recognition to each of the colleges and universities he had a hand in steering. "Maryland higher education is now nationally known because of the foundation he and others laid decades ago," said Freeman A. Hrabowski III, president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.
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