Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPrinceton Review
IN THE NEWS

Princeton Review

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Cheryl Johnston and Cheryl Johnston,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2003
When students return to Loyola College in Baltimore this weekend, they'll be moving into "dorms like palaces," according to Princeton Review's latest survey of U.S. colleges. Loyola students gave their dorms a more favorable ranking for comfort than students at any of the other schools surveyed for the annual college guide, The Best 351 Colleges, released last week. "Our facilities are very unique for what you would think of as residential dorms," said Leonard Brown, Loyola's director of student life.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Marin Langlieb | August 1, 2014
To the people at the College Board: Thank you for redesigning the SAT, effective spring 2016. No, seriously. Even though I will be the last class to take the regular SAT, I appreciate your kindness in not making future generations memorize words like "execrable" and "lassitude" and declining to take points off because I'm human and occasionally answer questions wrong. But while I thank you for trying to make it better, the only way to make the SAT perfect is to get rid of it. The SAT is a 225-minute race to the finish line encompassing everything schools have been trying to prepare students for since pre-school.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | August 26, 1998
So the quirky Princeton Review guidebook to customer satisfaction among U.S. college students is out, and it finds St. John's College in Annapolis comes out tops in distaste for the food served on campus.You could say that when tuition is more than $20,000 a year, students have a right to expect their money's worth. But college student who can't find a good meal in Annapolis probably needs a remedial course in eating even if he or she has read all The Great Books in the program.More happily for the administration, the school ranks No. 5 in good teaching, No. 4 in accessibility of professors and No. 3 in class discussion, according to "The Princeton Review's Best 311 Colleges," just published by Random House.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2013
Mixed news for Maryland's LGBT high schoolers looking to attend one of the nation's most LGBT-friendly colleges: They'll have to head out of state. As part of its annual rankings book, Princeton Review rated the 20 most LGBT-friendly colleges and universities, and no Maryland schools made the cut. On the flipside, no Maryland schools appeared on Princeton Review's "LGBT-Unfriendly" list (though Catholic University in neighboring D.C. did). So it's not as if the state's public and private institutions aren't accepting of LGBT students.
FEATURES
By SUN STAFF | August 25, 2003
While students may be curious about how their school ranked - and for what - in the new survey results by Princeton Review, administrators don't put much stock in the findings. "The Princeton Review is not one of the guidebooks that college admissions officers take very seriously because of the way the data is gathered," said Barbara Goyette, vice president of college advancement at St. John's College in Annapolis. "The Princeton Review sometimes uses data that is a couple of years old. It's not very scientifically conducted."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 4, 1996
Until now, U.S. News & World Report and Money magazines have virtually held high school students captive with their ratings and rankings of colleges.But later this month, Time and Newsweek may turn what has been a skirmish into a full-scale battle for the attention of college shoppers by publishing their own guidebooks.There is money to be made, said Steven Barlow, a media industry analyst with the brokerage firm Smith Barney in New York, and demand for this type of information is increasing.
NEWS
September 4, 1999
AH YES, combine the U.S. News & World Report pecking order of universities and colleges with the Princeton Review's rating of "party" or "stone cold sober" schools. What do you get? A certain correlation of parties with football prowess and the South. Otherwise, the prestige, selectivity, fun in intellectual and cultural dimensions, likely professional future and other criteria of excellence go mostly with sobriety. Of course, some places are virtually drunk with intellectual excitement, but that's not quantifiable.
NEWS
By Sejal Mehta | September 4, 2005
Author Dabney to visit AACC campus Sept. 22 Author, scholar and biographer Lewis M. Dabney will visit Anne Arundel Community College at 12:30 p.m. Sept. 22 in the Cade Center for Fine Arts, Room 219, on the Arnold campus, 101 College Parkway. Dabney will discuss his latest work, Edmund Wilson: A Life in Literature. The event is free and will be followed by refreshments. AACC is bringing Dabney to the campus in conjunction with the expansion of its honors program this fall. Students who complete at least three of the college's offered honors programs with a C or better will earn a letter of recognition and are eligible to transfer to honors programs at other institutions.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,sun reporter | August 25, 2006
Several national publications gave high marks to the Naval Academy this week for top-flight engineering and chemistry programs, accessible professors and its "stone-cold sober" campus. The engineering program has long won national renown, and this year it was ranked third by U.S. News and World Report among institutions that don't grant doctorates. The academy tied for third in that category with the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, N.Y., and Cooper Union in New York City. Two private schools tied for first: Harvey Mudd College in Claremont, Calif.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | April 15, 1994
Put your money where your mind is.Coaching classes for standardized education tests have become big business. The goals are qualifying for everything from college entrance to graduate school to professional licensing.This year, with a brand-new Scholastic Assessment Test (the former SAT now has the word "aptitude" removed) for college entrance, there's a 50 percent increase nationwide in coaching-class enrollment at firms such as Kaplan Educational Centers and the Princeton Review. Hundreds of smaller operations also offer coaching.
NEWS
By Carlene Buccino | December 12, 2012
Americans think we live in a meritocracy where hard work can take you from rags to riches. Access to a great education can be an escape from the cyclical poverty found in Baltimore and other major cites. Attending an elite university is particularly helpful. Studies show that graduates of elite institutions - and Ivy League schools in particular - are more successful than graduates from other institutions. Admission into the Ivy League and other top schools is also considered to be meritocratic.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,sun reporter | August 25, 2006
Several national publications gave high marks to the Naval Academy this week for top-flight engineering and chemistry programs, accessible professors and its "stone-cold sober" campus. The engineering program has long won national renown, and this year it was ranked third by U.S. News and World Report among institutions that don't grant doctorates. The academy tied for third in that category with the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, N.Y., and Cooper Union in New York City. Two private schools tied for first: Harvey Mudd College in Claremont, Calif.
NEWS
By Sejal Mehta | September 4, 2005
Author Dabney to visit AACC campus Sept. 22 Author, scholar and biographer Lewis M. Dabney will visit Anne Arundel Community College at 12:30 p.m. Sept. 22 in the Cade Center for Fine Arts, Room 219, on the Arnold campus, 101 College Parkway. Dabney will discuss his latest work, Edmund Wilson: A Life in Literature. The event is free and will be followed by refreshments. AACC is bringing Dabney to the campus in conjunction with the expansion of its honors program this fall. Students who complete at least three of the college's offered honors programs with a C or better will earn a letter of recognition and are eligible to transfer to honors programs at other institutions.
FEATURES
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2005
With school-monitored fraternity and sorority parties on campus, city noise-control officers patrolling off-campus parties and only a handful of bars in downtown, some in College Park were stunned yesterday by a new survey that ranks the University of Maryland among the top 20 "party schools" in the country. Maryland, in fact, just made the list, coming in at No. 20 in the rankings compiled annually by the Princeton Review, a New York-based educational preparation and testing company. It was apparently Maryland's first appearance among so-called party schools, which are ranked using such criteria as student alcohol and drug use, popularity of Greek life and hours spent studying each week.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2004
WOULD Shakespeare get a good grade on the new SAT writing test? How about Ted Kaczynski, the Unabomber? If we're to believe a trio of officials of the Princeton Review test coaching service, Kaczynski's political screed would score higher than seminal works of Shakespeare, Hemingway and Gertrude Stein in the new college entrance test, which the sponsoring College Board will roll out next year. In an article in the March issue of The Atlantic, the Princeton Review folks apply SAT scoring criteria to passages from the four authors.
FEATURES
By SUN STAFF | August 25, 2003
While students may be curious about how their school ranked - and for what - in the new survey results by Princeton Review, administrators don't put much stock in the findings. "The Princeton Review is not one of the guidebooks that college admissions officers take very seriously because of the way the data is gathered," said Barbara Goyette, vice president of college advancement at St. John's College in Annapolis. "The Princeton Review sometimes uses data that is a couple of years old. It's not very scientifically conducted."
NEWS
By Charles Lane | March 27, 1998
CAN we live without affirmative action in college and professional school admissions? In a provocative essay in a recent issue of The New Republic, sociologist Nathan Glazer explained why the answer must be no. The difference between black and white performance on standardized tests is so large and so immutable (in the short term) that to institute a color-blind admissions policy -- as California and Texas have done recently -- results in a student population that almost entirely excludes blacks.
FEATURES
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2005
With school-monitored fraternity and sorority parties on campus, city noise-control officers patrolling off-campus parties and only a handful of bars in downtown, some in College Park were stunned yesterday by a new survey that ranks the University of Maryland among the top 20 "party schools" in the country. Maryland, in fact, just made the list, coming in at No. 20 in the rankings compiled annually by the Princeton Review, a New York-based educational preparation and testing company. It was apparently Maryland's first appearance among so-called party schools, which are ranked using such criteria as student alcohol and drug use, popularity of Greek life and hours spent studying each week.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Johnston and Cheryl Johnston,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2003
When students return to Loyola College in Baltimore this weekend, they'll be moving into "dorms like palaces," according to Princeton Review's latest survey of U.S. colleges. Loyola students gave their dorms a more favorable ranking for comfort than students at any of the other schools surveyed for the annual college guide, The Best 351 Colleges, released last week. "Our facilities are very unique for what you would think of as residential dorms," said Leonard Brown, Loyola's director of student life.
NEWS
By Christina Bittner and Christina Bittner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 5, 1999
ANYONE concerned about high cancer rates and air pollution in North County and southern Baltimore communities is welcome to attend a meeting at 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Brooklyn O'Malley PAL Center on Patapsco Avenue.The meeting is sponsored by the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, the Baltimore City Health Department, Concerned Citizens for a Better Brooklyn and the Community of Curtis Bay Association.Hopkins will begin a study this fall to determine the levels of volatile organic compounds, such as benzene and carbon petrochloride, airborne particulate matter and indoor house dust, to which the residents of these communities might be exposed.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.