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By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | September 6, 1997
PHILADELPHIA -- Like people the world over, Martin Baker spent last Saturday night riveted to the television set as it reported news of Princess Diana's Paris car crash, of her injuries, and her eventual death.Unlike people the world over, Baker, vacationing with his wife, Ann Elise Smoot, at her parents' house in Radnor, Pa., had to do more than just mourn once the funeral arrangements were announced.Baker is the sub-organist at Westminster Abbey, the second-in-command, after the abbey's conductor.
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 26, 1998
You might think NBC has invented a new programming genre.Monday night, it will present a highly publicized two-hour special about Diana, Princess of Wales, on the first anniversary of her death. The program is produced and, in the words of NBC, "lovingly presented" by Richard Attenborough, who won an Academy Award for his direction of a little film called "Gandhi" and was made a lord by Queen Elizabeth II in 1993. NBC and Attenborough are calling "Diana" a "documentary tribute," which might seem confusing to some viewers.
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FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | December 2, 1997
Rock and roll loves paying tribute to the dead. Dead rock stars in particular. From Buddy Holly (Don McLean's "American Pie") to Marvin Gaye (The Commodores' "Nightshift") to Notorious B.I.G. (Puff Daddy's "Missing You"), the pop canon is full of fond remembrances and sentimental tears.But a paean for a dead princess? You won't find too many of those rolling around in rock's attic, which may be why few of the 36 songs collected on the double-disc collection "Diana Princess of Wales Tribute" (Columbia 69012, arriving in stores today)
FEATURES
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 6, 1998
LONDON -- Callers from around the world jammed 24-hour phone lines yesterday as tickets went on sale to view the burial site of Diana, Princess of Wales.Despite the massive volume, only 10,000 tickets out of 152,500 available were sold in the first eight hours, as more than 200 operators were seemingly overwhelmed.Diana's family estate at Althorp in Northamptonshire will be open to 2,500 visitors a day between July 1, the princess' birthday, and Aug. 30, the eve of the anniversary of her death in a car crash in Paris.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 26, 1998
You might think NBC has invented a new programming genre.Monday night, it will present a highly publicized two-hour special about Diana, Princess of Wales, on the first anniversary of her death. The program is produced and, in the words of NBC, "lovingly presented" by Richard Attenborough, who won an Academy Award for his direction of a little film called "Gandhi" and was made a lord by Queen Elizabeth II in 1993. NBC and Attenborough are calling "Diana" a "documentary tribute," which might seem confusing to some viewers.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 6, 1997
LONDON -- The de-sanctification of Diana, Princess of Wales, has already begun.The first dissonant sounds in the harmony of grief that has unfolded much of this week came as Britain prepared itself for Diana's funeral. They are tentative criticisms, but of the sort often sent her way when she was alive.She's getting it at home and from abroad, from people who professed to admire her in the past, such as Camille Paglia, the controversial American feminist, and from old enemies as well. Bizarre conspiracy theories are in the air, part of the traffic on the Internet, collected by newspapers in pubs and off the streets.
NEWS
By BILL GLAUBER and BILL GLAUBER,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 6, 1997
LONDON -- With a brief speech and tearful walks among throngs of their grieving subjects, Britain's royal family rallied itself and its country on the eve of this morning's funeral for Diana, Princess of Wales.Queen Elizabeth II praised her former daughter-in-law yesterday as "an exceptional and gifted human being," adding that "no one who knew Diana will ever forget her."Meanwhile, Diana's sons, Princes William, 15, and Harry, 12, accompanied by her former husband, Prince Charles, made an emotional pilgrimage to her former London palace as Britons by the score bowed and wept.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 29, 1996
LONDON -- She claims a title, the royal apartment and the influence over the kids. He, as always, remains first in line to be the king of England.Yesterday, Princess Diana announced she had agreed to divorce Prince Charles, a move that marked the beginning of the end of the world's most publicized marital breakup.A final divorce settlement still needs to be worked out. Prince Charles' position as heir apparent to his mother Queen Elizabeth II's throne is not imperiled by the action, according to constitutional experts.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | November 7, 1992
The Princess of Wales took the unprecedented step yesterday of denying allegations in the British press about her relationship with the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh.Princess Diana returned to London after an official trip with her husband, Prince Charles, to South Korea. The tour was reported with stories calling attention to the royal couple's "unhappy" marriage.But some stories, apparently related to a new chapter in Andrew Morton's controversial biography of the princess, indicated that the Queen insisted that a reluctant Diana make the official Asia trip.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 14, 1997
LONDON -- In an emotional news conference at a celebrity tennis tournament in Florida last week, pop star Elton John urged people still mourning the death of Diana, Princess of Wales to begin putting aside their grief and get on with their lives.Still, they might like to buy the new version of John's song "Candle in the Wind," which is expected to be the biggest-selling single of all time.zTC Proceeds, John pledged, are to go to the Princess of Wales Memorial Fund, which is becoming the fastest-growing memorial fund of all time.
FEATURES
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 31, 1997
LONDON -- Call him Sir Elton.Rock star Elton John, 50, whose singing of "Candle in the Wind" broke hearts and raised hopes at the funeral of Britain's Princess Diana late this summer, receives a knighthood in the New Year Honors List published today.For weeks, there was speculation the flamboyant rocker would headline the list of honors recipients drawn up by Queen Elizabeth II, Prime Minister Tony Blair and assorted British government ministries.The honors -- nearly a thousand of them -- range from lordships to such designated initials as MBE, for Member of the Order of the British Empire.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | December 2, 1997
Rock and roll loves paying tribute to the dead. Dead rock stars in particular. From Buddy Holly (Don McLean's "American Pie") to Marvin Gaye (The Commodores' "Nightshift") to Notorious B.I.G. (Puff Daddy's "Missing You"), the pop canon is full of fond remembrances and sentimental tears.But a paean for a dead princess? You won't find too many of those rolling around in rock's attic, which may be why few of the 36 songs collected on the double-disc collection "Diana Princess of Wales Tribute" (Columbia 69012, arriving in stores today)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 14, 1997
LONDON -- In an emotional news conference at a celebrity tennis tournament in Florida last week, pop star Elton John urged people still mourning the death of Diana, Princess of Wales to begin putting aside their grief and get on with their lives.Still, they might like to buy the new version of John's song "Candle in the Wind," which is expected to be the biggest-selling single of all time.zTC Proceeds, John pledged, are to go to the Princess of Wales Memorial Fund, which is becoming the fastest-growing memorial fund of all time.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 10, 1997
LONDON -- How to honor Princess Diana?And how to move on?Those are the questions that loom over Great Britain after the death, funeral and unprecedented outpouring of emotion for Diana, Princess of Wales, overshadowing all other events -- even some of great and enduring historical significance.Many Britons cannot let go of Diana's memory. They still show up outside her former home at Kensington Palace, bearing flowers and cards, adding them to a 4-foot-high pile of dying roses and lilies that extends 80 yards from the palace gates.
NEWS
By BILL GLAUBER: SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 7, 1997
Remember the first time you saw a picture of her, the blue eyes dancing downward, a shy smile on her youthful face. It was all a fairy tale back then, the story of a girl marrying her prince, and the next chapter was to be that they lived happily ever after.The reality was different, of course. The marriage was troubled, and then it ended. Her fame soared and then became a nearly unsupportable burden, creating expectations that probably no one could have met.But people still believed in the fairy tale and saw something desperately alluring in this brittle, beautiful woman.
NEWS
September 7, 1997
Your Royal Highness, how prepared were you for the pressures that came with marrying into the royal family?At the age of 19, you always think you're prepared for everything, and you think you have the knowledge of what's coming ahead. But although I was daunted at the prospect at the time, I felt I had the support of my husband-to-be.What were the expectations that you had for married life?I think like any marriage, especially when you've had divorced parents like myself, you'd want to try even harder to make it work, and you don't want to fall back into a pattern that you've seen happen in your own family.
NEWS
July 14, 1996
NOTHING MUCH CHANGED with the long-awaited announcement of a divorce between the Prince and Princess of Wales based on their 3 1/2 -year separation. Prince Charlesremains heir to the throne of his mother, Queen Elizabeth II, and would be the first divorced British king since George I acceded in 1714.Charles' aunt and a brother are divorced; his divorced sister has remarried. The institution of marriage is even weaker in Britain than in the U.S. The myth has grown up that while the middle classes may ignore traditional morality, the royal family may not. In the golden age of monarchy, 'twas the other way round.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | November 12, 1992
She is Britain's melancholy princess, Diana of the sorrows -- she of the moisty eyelashes and tilted, tousled head, the face that has triggered 10,000 camera shutters."
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 6, 1997
LONDON -- The de-sanctification of Diana, Princess of Wales, has already begun.The first dissonant sounds in the harmony of grief that has unfolded much of this week came as Britain prepared itself for Diana's funeral. They are tentative criticisms, but of the sort often sent her way when she was alive.She's getting it at home and from abroad, from people who professed to admire her in the past, such as Camille Paglia, the controversial American feminist, and from old enemies as well. Bizarre conspiracy theories are in the air, part of the traffic on the Internet, collected by newspapers in pubs and off the streets.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | September 6, 1997
PHILADELPHIA -- Like people the world over, Martin Baker spent last Saturday night riveted to the television set as it reported news of Princess Diana's Paris car crash, of her injuries, and her eventual death.Unlike people the world over, Baker, vacationing with his wife, Ann Elise Smoot, at her parents' house in Radnor, Pa., had to do more than just mourn once the funeral arrangements were announced.Baker is the sub-organist at Westminster Abbey, the second-in-command, after the abbey's conductor.
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