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NEWS
By SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | July 26, 2006
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- The sudden lurch of the Crown Princess cruise ship last week that sent 94 passengers to the hospital was caused by a bridge officer's mistake, Princess Cruises said yesterday. But in an open letter to passengers posted on the Web site of Los Angeles-based Princess Cruises, President Alan Buckelew said human error was the cause and "the appropriate personnel changes have been made." Princess, declining to specify those changes, said the error was not made by the ship's captain, who continues to command the $500 million vessel, but by another officer who is no longer on active duty.
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TRAVEL
By Arline and Sam Bleecker and Special to Tribune Newspapers | March 30, 2010
Like migratory birds, cruise ships regularly shift from one part of the world to another as the seasons shift -- from the Caribbean to Europe or South America or from Alaska or the West Coast to Asia or the South Pacific, for example. These usually twice annual exoduses are so huge that they could rival a naval armada, and they offer exceptional bargains, as well as lots of languid days at sea, and, occasionally, even unusual ports of call. Veteran cruise book author Kay Showker considers repositioning cruises "about the best value in cruising," compared with a regular cruise on the same ship.
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BUSINESS
By David Conn | August 13, 1991
ON BOARD THE REGAL PRINCESS -- Teresa Anderson snoops around every corner of this 811-foot-long floating resort, fretting over details like a hostess waiting for her party guests.The new light fixtures haven't arrived for the pizzeria on the Bravo deck. A small tree is blocking the mural in front of the Adagio bar on the Promenade deck. Someone forgot the black granite for the floor in front of the cabaret on the Dolphin deck. The painting outside the Baha deck is . . . questionable -- an abstract of an iceberg.
TRAVEL
By Jaclyn Giovis and Jaclyn Giovis,South Florida Sun-Sentinel | September 28, 2008
In today's tough economy, cruising can offer travelers a good value - lodging, food, entertainment - all for a pre-set price. But the "not-included" fees and onboard "extras" add up fast onboard cruise ships. Soda and cocktails, shore excursions, gratuities, photos, spa treatments, tuxedo rentals, Internet access and more are available at sea - for a charge. Passengers who research and plan before embarking on their cruise vacation can help themselves have fun and avoid a shocking bill at home port.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | August 9, 1991
AT THE CONCLUSION of her contract last month, veteran broadcaster Donna Hamilton left WJZ-TV to devote all her attention to the Mockingbird Company, formed earlier this year with her husband, David Paulson. Hamilton, a nine-year veteran at Channel 13, came to Baltimore in 1981 to host and produce WJZ's Evening Magazine and later a live talk show, "Afternoon."You may have seen Mockingbird's first hourlong documentary, "The Peacemakers," on WJZ in June. Next step for this production may be on public television or cable.
TRAVEL
By MARY LU ABBOTT and MARY LU ABBOTT,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 9, 2006
A cruise ship fire March 23 that killed one person and injured 11 has prompted an investigation that could bring about changes affecting consumers and the cruise industry. The 3 a.m. blaze aboard Princess Cruises' Star Princess, sailing from Grand Cayman to Montego Bay, Jamaica, swept through 100 cabins on the four-year-old vessel, melting balconies along three upper decks, charring interiors and leaving a large blackened section on the port side of the 18-deck mega-ship. Now officials are asking how this could have happened on a comparatively new cruise ship, built to the highest international safety standards designed to prevent such a disaster.
TRAVEL
By Jay Clarke and Jay Clarke,Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 23, 2003
If you're a kid, you're going to like what the cruise lines are doing to make sure you have a good time on board. How about dissecting a squid? Or painting your own T-shirt? Playing candy-bar bingo or fooling around with "space mud?" All those, plus computer classes, scavenger hunts, trivia contests, teen "bars" and dance clubs, are some of the ways cruise lines now are catering to young people from toddlers to teen-agers. It seems to be working, because record numbers of youngsters are boarding cruise ships these days.
TRAVEL
By Jaclyn Giovis and Jaclyn Giovis,South Florida Sun-Sentinel | September 28, 2008
In today's tough economy, cruising can offer travelers a good value - lodging, food, entertainment - all for a pre-set price. But the "not-included" fees and onboard "extras" add up fast onboard cruise ships. Soda and cocktails, shore excursions, gratuities, photos, spa treatments, tuxedo rentals, Internet access and more are available at sea - for a charge. Passengers who research and plan before embarking on their cruise vacation can help themselves have fun and avoid a shocking bill at home port.
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY and LIZ F. KAY,SUN REPORTER | July 21, 2006
The photos from Emanuel and Janice Perlman's latest vacation are a little different from shots they took during other cruises. Along with photos of them smiling in tropical ports of call, they've got images of the medical triage area outside their stateroom and vans lined up to whisk passengers to the airport when the cruise was cut short. "We couldn't believe what we were seeing outside our window," Emanuel Perlman said at his Pikesville home yesterday. The couple were among about 240 passengers who were injured aboard the Crown Princess when the cruise ship suddenly tilted to starboard Tuesday afternoon, about an hour and a half after leaving Port Canaveral, Fla., on the last leg of a nine-day trip.
BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | August 13, 1991
It was dinner time and President Harry S Truman ushered his guest, Winston Churchill, to his seat aboard the presidential yacht. The chair collapsed under the weight of the rotund British prime minister, prompting Truman to politely suggest it was time to rehabilitate the vessel.Such is the stuff of legend around the offices of H. Chambers Co., an old-line Baltimore firm that was called upon to design the new interior of the yacht -- though not its chairs -- and yachts of several presidents to follow.
NEWS
By SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | July 26, 2006
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- The sudden lurch of the Crown Princess cruise ship last week that sent 94 passengers to the hospital was caused by a bridge officer's mistake, Princess Cruises said yesterday. But in an open letter to passengers posted on the Web site of Los Angeles-based Princess Cruises, President Alan Buckelew said human error was the cause and "the appropriate personnel changes have been made." Princess, declining to specify those changes, said the error was not made by the ship's captain, who continues to command the $500 million vessel, but by another officer who is no longer on active duty.
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY and LIZ F. KAY,SUN REPORTER | July 21, 2006
The photos from Emanuel and Janice Perlman's latest vacation are a little different from shots they took during other cruises. Along with photos of them smiling in tropical ports of call, they've got images of the medical triage area outside their stateroom and vans lined up to whisk passengers to the airport when the cruise was cut short. "We couldn't believe what we were seeing outside our window," Emanuel Perlman said at his Pikesville home yesterday. The couple were among about 240 passengers who were injured aboard the Crown Princess when the cruise ship suddenly tilted to starboard Tuesday afternoon, about an hour and a half after leaving Port Canaveral, Fla., on the last leg of a nine-day trip.
TRAVEL
By MARY LU ABBOTT and MARY LU ABBOTT,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 9, 2006
A cruise ship fire March 23 that killed one person and injured 11 has prompted an investigation that could bring about changes affecting consumers and the cruise industry. The 3 a.m. blaze aboard Princess Cruises' Star Princess, sailing from Grand Cayman to Montego Bay, Jamaica, swept through 100 cabins on the four-year-old vessel, melting balconies along three upper decks, charring interiors and leaving a large blackened section on the port side of the 18-deck mega-ship. Now officials are asking how this could have happened on a comparatively new cruise ship, built to the highest international safety standards designed to prevent such a disaster.
NEWS
By TOM STIEGHORST and TOM STIEGHORST,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | March 24, 2006
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- For 21 years, the cruise industry has found comfort in the fact that accidents aboard ships at sea haven't resulted in the death of a passenger. That string ended yesterday with a fatal fire on a Princess Cruises ship that killed one man and left 11 guests suffering from smoke inhalation. The fire started about 3:10 a.m. in a passenger area as the 109,000-ton Star Princess was en route from Grand Cayman to Montego Bay, Jamaica. It damaged at least 100 cabins before being put out by ship personnel.
TRAVEL
By Jay Clarke and Jay Clarke,Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 23, 2003
If you're a kid, you're going to like what the cruise lines are doing to make sure you have a good time on board. How about dissecting a squid? Or painting your own T-shirt? Playing candy-bar bingo or fooling around with "space mud?" All those, plus computer classes, scavenger hunts, trivia contests, teen "bars" and dance clubs, are some of the ways cruise lines now are catering to young people from toddlers to teen-agers. It seems to be working, because record numbers of youngsters are boarding cruise ships these days.
FEATURES
By Kim Upton and Kim Upton,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 9, 2000
There once was a time, not so long ago, when I smiled at the mention of cruise-ship food as a respectable culinary experience. But eight cruises later -- down the Nile, through the Panama Canal, threading both the Caribbean and the Mediterranean and crossing the Atlantic -- I have altered that view. Dining at sea has changed. In fact, now dinner can be a culinary window into the countries being explored and the ships investigating them. Take, for example, my recent Atlantic crossing on the QE2. What I enjoyed at the table was tandoori chicken (a remembrance of the English in India)
NEWS
By TOM STIEGHORST and TOM STIEGHORST,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | March 24, 2006
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- For 21 years, the cruise industry has found comfort in the fact that accidents aboard ships at sea haven't resulted in the death of a passenger. That string ended yesterday with a fatal fire on a Princess Cruises ship that killed one man and left 11 guests suffering from smoke inhalation. The fire started about 3:10 a.m. in a passenger area as the 109,000-ton Star Princess was en route from Grand Cayman to Montego Bay, Jamaica. It damaged at least 100 cabins before being put out by ship personnel.
FEATURES
By Judi Dash and Judi Dash,Special to The Sun | October 30, 1994
Suggest a cruise vacation to a fitness buff, and you're apt to get a negative response. Sure, most lines have added aerobics classes and exercise equipment to their ships, and shore excursions now include active options such as white-water rafting, diving and mountain biking.But what about the food? A dozen feedings a day, a parade of killer desserts, and that ominous midnight buffet . . . As one quipster put it: "Afloat you bloat."Not in the '90s.Responding to demand from health-conscious repeat passengers, and trying to attract a new clientele among younger vacationers, the cruise industry has lightened up its menus while beefing up athletic activities.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1997
Late last week, as EF Language began to pull away from the leaders in the Whitbread Round the World Race for the Volvo Trophy, skipper Paul Cayard said in an electronic mail report to race headquarters in England: "This is the real Whitbread now. No more Princess cruises . . . We are flying."Cayard of San Francisco and EF Language (Sweden) won the first leg of the race from Southampton to Cape Town, South Africa, yesterday, and the 31-day, 7,350-nautical mile journey was an eye-opener."I have been thinking about how to describe this to my friends and family," Cayard reported, while EF Language surfed through 15-foot seas in 30 knots of wind on the sprint from the island of Trindade across the South Atlantic Ocean to Cape Town.
FEATURES
By Arline Bleecker and Arline Bleecker,ORLANDO SENTINEL | October 12, 1997
Ready or not, here they come: The next barrage of new ships that will float out between now and the end of next year will bring 14 vessels in 15 months.For cruisers who love to sail inaugurals, here's the lineup. For more information, contact a travel agent.* Carnival Cruise Lines will introduce two sister ships in 1998: Elation March 20 and Paradise in November. Paradise will be the first totally smoke-free cruise ship. Both 70,000-ton, 2,040-passenger vessels will boast an expanded Children's World area.
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