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By Margaret Atwood | November 3, 1999
Editor's note: Prissy Princess Prunella plans to marry a pinheaded prince until an old woman casts a spell on her.Princess Prunella lived in a pink palace with her pinheaded parents, her three plump pussycats and her puppydog.Princess Prunella was proud, prissy and pretty, and unhappily very spoiled. She would never pick up her playthings. Instead, after her breakfast, she would parade around all day in puffy petticoats sprinkled with sparkling pink sequins, a pair of pale purple pumps with peonies on the insteps and a pinafore printed with pansies and petunias, slurping peppermints and peering at her dimples in a pocket mirror.
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SPORTS
By Chris Korman and The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
Todd Pletcher 's 38-1 long shot Princess of Sylmar won the $1 million Kentucky Oaks on Friday, giving the trainer a chance to become the first since Ben Jones in 1952 to win the top race for 3-year-old fillies and the Kentucky Derby in the same year. Pletcher, who has five horses entered in the Derby, had four in the Oaks. Dreaming of Julia was the favorite but could not recover from a rowdy start to the race. "She got creamed coming out of [the gate] and it is hard to overcome that sort of thing," Pletcher said.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 8, 1994
The first problem with "The Princess and the Goblin" is that it has too many cats in it. Now I happen to like cats, and I'm not about to suggest to the world's animators that they informally reach an agreement not to show cats, but . . . if you do show a child a cat, the child will go "meeow." Always, every time, all of them. It just happens. It's a law of the universe as binding as the third law of thermodynamics. So what's the matter with that? OK, you sit in a movie theater full of meowing children.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2013
Last month, on the night Rihanna won her seventh Grammy award, the 25-year-old singer performed "Stay," a sparsely arranged ballad from her latest album, "Unapologetic. " Often known for bombastic performances of uptempo dance songs, Rihanna instead gambled on raw emotion and vulnerability. The lack of flash, and flesh, was uncharacteristic, but the risk paid off. It was one of the few highlights of an otherwise lackluster night. Unsurprisingly, CBS panned to Chris Brown, dressed all in white, for the first reaction.
NEWS
By Al Webb | November 13, 2002
LONDON - The usual image of a butler is of a taciturn gent who irons the Sunday newspaper, serves up the sherry and otherwise keeps up with family goings-on with an eye firmly glued to the keyhole. And there's the odd one into whose ear a queen whispers dire warnings of dark forces abroad in the land. But then, Paul Burrell is not your run-of-the-mill Jeeves. In addition to serving up one lump or two at afternoon tea, his duties as butler to Princess Diana ranged from smuggling her lovers into the palace in the trunk of his car to helping her hand out the equivalent of $75 at a time to railway station prostitutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John E. McIntyre and John E. McIntyre,Sun Staff | September 19, 1999
"Diana in Search of Herself: Portrait of a Troubled Princess," by Sally Bedell Smith. Times Books. 368 pages. $24.Diana Spencer, later Diana, Princess of Wales, appears to have lived more for other people than for herself, to a degree unusual even for celebrities.When she became the bride of Prince Charles in 1981, the heady combination of Cinderella wish-fulfillment and Anglophilia got thousands of Americans out of bed at 5 a.m. to watch nuptials ever after described tediously in the press as a "fairy-tale wedding."
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | April 27, 2007
With its production of A Little Princess at Chesapeake Arts Center Studio Theatre, Merely Players continues its tradition of bringing together intergenerational casts and behind-the-scenes youths and parents to provide high-quality theater. The show, which I believe is new to our area, is based on the children's story by Frances Hodgson Burnett. John Vreeke adapted A Little Princess for the stage with music by Will Severin and George David Weiss. Burnett, who also wrote Little Lord Fauntleroy, The Lost Prince and The Secret Garden, was adept at adding romance to her characters' difficult lives to create uplifting stories.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | February 24, 1995
An article in the Feb. 24 edition about a production of "Princess and the Pea" mentioned the wrong company. Children's Theatre of Annapolis is not associated with the production.The Sun regrets the error.I grew quite fond of the "fractured fairy tale" approach favored by the "Under the Hood Productions" gang when it was the children's theater troupe in residence at the old Annapolis Dinner Theatre.So I couldn't help wondering how much I'd miss the hilarity when I saw Children's Theatre of Annapolis' "Princess and the Pea" at the recently renamed Chesapeake Music Hall.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | March 29, 1992
OCEAN CITY -- By 90 minutes past noon, the main deck lounge was tranquil. A dozen fishermen napped. A few more joked quietly by the galley counter, their words no more than mumbles over the rumble of triple diesels deep in the hull.A trio of anglers from Ohio kept a station on the stern deck, where the motion of a large boat in a seaway is somewhat dampened, and a northern gannet rose and fell across the wake as the O.C. Princess headed back toward the docks.Coolers, buckets and bags held the catch of the day -- mackerel and spiny dogfish, small sharks.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | May 19, 1991
The O.C. Princess described by its owners as the ultimate fishing, and cruising boat, has been added to the fleet of party boats that serve Ocean City fishermen.The 88-foot O.C. Princess, which operates out of the Shantytown Pier, will run to the fishing grounds at 30 miles per hour. Its cabin is heated and air-conditioned, and is equipped with a galley to serve breakfast, lunch or dinner.The reason for the speed and accommodations is, said Charles Nichols, vice president of the Shantytown Marina, that fishing should be pleasant for families that come to Ocean City.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
Ballet Theatre of Maryland opened its 35th season, and 10th with artistic director Dianna Cuatto at the helm, with the fireworks of a world-premiere ballet. Known for enchanting audiences with classic tales at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, Cuatto summoned new choreographic wizardry for her personal favorite, "The Dancing Princesses," a lesser-known Grimm fairy tale. Striving to deliver "a dramatic retelling in dance where I could create an amazing new secret world of magic," Cuatto achieved her goal and more.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2011
New York City has its descending ball. Miami Beach has its giant orange. And Princess Anne has its stuffed muskrat. At midnight Saturday, the town of 2,400 people in Somerset County will become the latest in a line of Maryland communities — and scores of towns across the country — to embrace a growing tradition: dropping a locally significant if less than elegant object from a great height as a way of welcoming the new year. "The muskrat is a part of our heritage, and we wanted to drop something relevant to us," said Ben Adler, director of the Princess Anne Main Street Partnership, one of the brains behind the plan.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2011
The hook is simple: Five, all-male, musically inclined Lady Gaga fans convert the pop queen's four-on-the-floor anthems into glam rock and name it Rad Bromance. It's a flashy act, but strip away the glitter and lead singer Ryan Shtainhorn's skin-tight outfit, and what remains is a Philadelphia tribute band able to morph Gaga songs into a hybrid of flamboyant showmanship, pop-punk breakdowns and enough dance-thump to get a crowd moving. Rad Bromance's Monster Balls Tour stops by The Ottobar Saturday, marking the band's first all-ages show in Maryland.
FEATURES
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2011
Soon-to-be princess Kate Middleton has a few prominent Marylanders — and American celebrities — in her family tree. Middleton, a commoner who marries Prince William on Friday, is a distant cousin of "The Star-Spangled Banner" author Francis Scott Key, talk-show host Ellen DeGeneres and Colonial Maryland governor Sir Thomas Bladen, the namesake of Bladensburg, according to "The Ancestry of Catherine Middleton. " Released this month by the New England Historic Genealogical Society, the book traces Middleton's roots back hundreds of years, and ties the 29-year-old to a host of historical figures, from George Washington to World War II Gen. George S. Patton.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2011
Like a lot of children her age, Skylar Kagan, 5, loves to dress up. She owns five tiaras and a handful of superhero outfits. She and her twin brother, Matthew, so enjoy disguises that their parents, Jonathan and Marnie Kagan of Annapolis, keep two trunks stuffed with costumes. She went as Wonder Woman last Halloween. "Skylar just never misses an opportunity to become somebody else," Marnie Kagan says. This weekend, the kindergartener will have a chance to blend the magic of make-believe with U.S. history when she and other girls don gowns and crowns, visit the William Paca House, and share curtsies, tea and table talk with Queen Anne, the British monarch for whom Skylar's hometown was named 317 years ago. Well, not Queen Anne exactly.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2010
CHURCHVILLE, Md . – The princesses who inhabit author E.D. Baker's 10 children's books are more likely to have a laugh like a honking goose than like a tinkling bell. Baker's royal heroines curtsy clumsily, can't make small talk and are occasionally mistaken for one of the servants. Every single one of them is immersed in the natural world. And, because these young women have a tendency to trip over their oversized feet, they frequently return to the castle covered head to toe with some of the natural world's more odiferous substances.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2001
In the new Disney movie The Princess Diaries, there's a clumsy girl who becomes an elegant princess, a queen who turns out to be a fairy grandmother of sorts, ball gowns, tiaras and a first kiss in a magical setting. It's hardly groundbreaking stuff for Disney, which has explored the princess paradigm many times over from Cinderella to Beauty and the Beast. But with Julie Andrews in the house, talented newcomer Anne Hathaway in the lead and director Garry Marshall at the helm, Diaries manages to be a modern fairytale that may be predictable in parts but is warm, funny and charming nonetheless.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2000
Kim Lane arrived in Baltimore with her Honda Civic stuffed with clothes and all the money she had in the world - $700 - in her pocket. She'd come from a small town in upstate New York and had never before seen a city the size of Baltimore. Being a civic-minded woman, Lane gravitated toward the neediest parts of Baltimore. A decade after landing here, she is devoted to one of the city's grittiest, poorest neighborhoods: Pigtown. She's known to colleagues as the Princess of Pigtown, a title she seems to have earned.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley , Mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | December 11, 2009
Maryland author E.D. Baker recently sampled the delights of chauffeured limousines and red carpets, of photo-ops with film stars and designer desserts. Then she returned to her family's Harford County horse farm and mucked out the stalls. Baker is the children's novelist whose first book, "The Frog Princess," inspired the Disney animated film, "The Princess and the Frog." Not only is she credited in the film, but the entertainment conglomerate flew her to Los Angeles in late November to attend the premiere.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow , michael.sragow@baltsun.com | December 11, 2009
A gator blows a jazz horn just like Satchmo. The evening star besots a firefly. The dark corners of 1920s New Orleans overflow with evil voodoo while, deep in the bayou, a blind priestess, Mama Odie, practices some positive swamp sorcery. With ingredients like that, Dee-Dee Jackson, the Atlanta-based national president of the activity and support group Mocha Moms, says that "The Princess and the Frog" delivers the "Disney pixie dust" that her friends came to expect when fairy-tale heroines kicked off the Disney-animation renaissance with "The Little Mermaid" (1989)
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