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By Harold Brooks-Baker | April 26, 1991
IT IS rumored that Kitty Kelley's next project is a demolition job on Prince Philip, duke of Edinburgh. If a Kelley "biography" of the consort of Queen Elizabeth II approximated Nancy Reagan's, the monarchy could be greatly damaged.Perhaps Kelley or her greedy emulators, beloved of the chattering classes in England and America, will find commercial inspiration to do a book on Philip in the extraordinary media coverage she received on a visit to London this week. Her book tops Britain's best-seller list.
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NEWS
By Erica Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2011
At-risk youth in Baltimore city will have an opportunity to join an international network of young people in taking on a royal challenge to improve their lives by participating in the Duke of Edinburgh's Award-Young American's Challenge. Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, the youngest child of Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip and seventh in line to the British throne, visited Tuesday with students of the Living Classrooms Foundation to announce that Baltimore would join 132 countries, and 20 states and Washington, D.C., in the program.
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NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 20, 1996
LONDON -- Prince Philip, the tart-tongued husband of Queen Elizabeth II, was forced to offer an apology yesterday for his comments about the British government's plan to ban most handguns, part of the government's response to a March massacre at a school in Dunblane, Scotland.A day after he seemed to compare handguns to cricket bats, Prince Philip said through a Buckingham Palace spokesman that he "had no intention whatsoever of causing offense or distress to anyone and he is sorry if he has done so."
NEWS
February 24, 2011
May 15, 1991: President George H.W. Bush, Barbara Bush, Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip are in attendance as the Athletics beat the Orioles at Memorial Stadium.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 6, 2000
LONDON - Here he is: Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, Earl of Merioneth and Baron Greenwich, better known as the world's most famous royal spouse. Husband of the queen of England, father of the next king (maybe), rides in luxury cars, lives in some of the grandest homes in the realm and doesn't have to worry about a mortgage. So how does he like it? "I suppose I'm a pragmatist," Prince Philip said yesterday. "I'm here and I might as well get on with it. It's no good saying `what if' all the time."
FEATURES
By Nigel Dempster and Peter Evans | June 9, 1993
In Part Four of a five-part excerpt from "Behind Palace Doors: Marriage and Divorce in the House of Windsor" by Nigel Dempster and Peter Evans, Prince Philip ruined his marriage to Queen Elizabeth by indiscreet discussions of her sexual appetite and by carrying on with a bevy of debutantes, actresses and a famous author.Even people who in the past had never found Philip a particularly sympathetic figure felt a certain sympathy for him as the nasty scenes continued. "What he could not admit to his son was his own sense of failure as a husband and a father," says a former equerry.
NEWS
February 24, 2011
May 15, 1991: President George H.W. Bush, Barbara Bush, Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip are in attendance as the Athletics beat the Orioles at Memorial Stadium.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella | April 10, 1991
The Royals are coming to Memorial Stadium . . . the ones from London, not Kansas City.Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip will be at the stadium May 15 to watch what apparently will be their first baseball match ever."
NEWS
November 27, 1999
Charles Thomas, 64, a jazz pianist who shunned the spotlight of touring with Duke Ellington's band to play in his home state of Arkansas, died Tuesday of prostate cancer. Mr. Thomas headlined numerous jazz festivals and accompanied vocalists such as Tony Bennett. After Ellington's death, members of the bandleader's orchestra asked Mr. Thomas to take his place on the piano.Mr. Thomas didn't last long with the Duke Ellington Orchestra. He "got tired of being Duke Ellington -- he wanted to be Charlie Thomas," said his longtime manager, Jim Porter.
FEATURES
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 1, 1991
Washington -- The invitation says "Dress: Black Tie with Decorations." Given Governor William Donald Schaefer's fondness for fanciful dressing -- his gold-trimmed admiral's uniform was indeed memorable -- it's anyone's guess what medals, ribbons or flourishes Hizzoner will dig out to meet Her Majesty.The royal occasion? Governor Schaefer and companion Hilda Mae Snoops are among those invited to a dinner at the British Embassy hosted by Queen Elizabeth II and His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, during their four-day state visit to Washington later this month.
NEWS
December 28, 2007
PAT KIRKWOOD, 86 Musical theater star Pat Kirkwood, once a star of British musical theater, died Tuesday at Kitwood House nursing home in Ilkley, northern England. She had been suffering from Alzheimer's disease and a chest infection, said author and royal biographer Michael Thornton, a family friend. Ms. Kirkwood's career included leading roles in musicals written by Noel Coward, Cole Porter and Leonard Bernstein. But Ms. Kirkwood, who was married four times, was dogged much of her life by rumors of a romantic liaison with Prince Philip -- which she always denied -- after the two were seen dancing at a London nightclub.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 21, 2007
LONDON -- Glamorous is not exactly the first word that springs to mind when you think of Queen Elizabeth II, who became the oldest reigning monarch in British history yesterday. Consistent? Yes. Dedicated? Definitely. But glamorous? That would be like describing one her famed corgi dogs as lissome. Yet British Vogue has named this little old lady one of the world's 50 most glamorous women, along with Kate Moss, Naomi Campbell, and the queen's screen alter ego, Helen Mirren. It's not that the 81-year-old queen has undergone some kind of dramatic makeover.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun Reporter | May 5, 2007
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. -- It seemed most appropriate that Queen Elizabeth II should arrive here, a place of cobblestone streets and brick storefronts frozen in time, where people in period-piece costumes talk as if they're still in the 17th-century British settlement. "Hail the Queen," someone shouted from a crowd gathered to see Her Majesty's entrance into the Governor's Palace, where she dined with the likes of Vice President Dick Cheney and former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | May 5, 2007
When Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip visited Maryland nearly 50 years ago, they got a chance to attend a University of Maryland football game at College Park, visit a Giant supermarket, and take a ride on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad to New York. After spending four days in Canada, Elizabeth, then 31, who was described as looking "somewhat worn" by The Sun, arrived at Patrick Henry Airport in Williamsburg, Va., on Oct. 16, 1957. The royal couple's arrival launched an official six-day state visit to the U.S. After touring Jamestown and Williamsburg, the couple flew to Washington the next day aboard President Dwight D. Eisenhower's plane, Columbine III, and they were welcomed by Ike at National Airport.
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 15, 2006
LONDON -- The 1997 Paris car crash that killed Princess Diana and her boyfriend, Dodi Fayed, was an accident, not a murder plot hatched by the royal family, according to a British police investigation made public yesterday. "There was no conspiracy to murder any of the occupants of the car. This was a tragic accident," said John Stevens, former chief of the Metropolitan Police who led the three-year investigation. The inquiry's 832-page report also concluded that Princess Diana was not pregnant at the time of her death, nor did she have any intention of marrying Fayed even though he had purchased an engagement ring on the day of their death.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 17, 2003
LONDON - The curtsy: A woman or girl lowers her body briefly, bending her knees and holding her skirt with both hands as the right foot is lifted and guided backward and to the left, ever so daintily. The head is bowed slightly in a sign of respect. Always, always she offers a smile. Sheila Bransfield, 58, from the Kent village of Acol, practiced the curtsy in her home this week, just as she was taught in school as a young girl - just in case, her teachers told her - and she ran into only one hitch.
NEWS
By Susan Baer bTC Sun features writer Randi Henderson contributed to this article | May 16, 1991
Elton John's "Crocodile Rock" blared over the loudspeaker. Lisa Rothe of Greenbelt plunged into her plate of nachos. And then, just as the sun took a convenient dip, Her Majesty, the Queen of England, her most prim, her most proper, stepped into Memorial Stadium to mix it up at an O's game.She waved that little wavette of hers, and the crowd stood, whistled, cheered and, of course, pulled out cameras and binoculars that were more abundant last night than baseball caps."She looks kind of simple, not what I expected," said Pam Brown, a student at the Institute of Notre Dame.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | November 7, 1992
The Princess of Wales took the unprecedented step yesterday of denying allegations in the British press about her relationship with the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh.Princess Diana returned to London after an official trip with her husband, Prince Charles, to South Korea. The tour was reported with stories calling attention to the royal couple's "unhappy" marriage.But some stories, apparently related to a new chapter in Andrew Morton's controversial biography of the princess, indicated that the Queen insisted that a reluctant Diana make the official Asia trip.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | June 5, 2002
LONDON - A million people gathered at Buckingham Palace yesterday to declare, loudly and emotionally, their love for Queen Elizabeth II as she marked 50 years on her throne. A sea of people erupted in flag-waving and full-throated cheers as Elizabeth and her family appeared on the palace balcony yesterday evening, bringing to an end a four-day paroxysm of British patriotism. The queen and her husband, Prince Philip, appeared moved by the massive display of affection. After disappearing back into the palace, they emerged twice more and were greeted each time by roars of approval.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 6, 2000
LONDON - Here he is: Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, Earl of Merioneth and Baron Greenwich, better known as the world's most famous royal spouse. Husband of the queen of England, father of the next king (maybe), rides in luxury cars, lives in some of the grandest homes in the realm and doesn't have to worry about a mortgage. So how does he like it? "I suppose I'm a pragmatist," Prince Philip said yesterday. "I'm here and I might as well get on with it. It's no good saying `what if' all the time."
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