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Prince Of Thieves

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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 14, 1991
Like a famous timepiece, the timeless piece that is the Robin Hood legend can take a licking and keep on ticking.The latest parvenus to deliver a licking are the two American Kevins, Costner and Reynolds, who have hastily cobbled together "Robin Hood, Prince of Thieves," to much fame and anticipation and at a $50 million price tag. It has a lot of things wrong with it but in the end, the old story is so strong that it transcends the degradations; it keeps...
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SPORTS
By Sun staff | May 19, 1996
After crossing the finish line, after one streak had ended and another one had been extended, Pat Day fired his left fist into the air. He spread his fingers as wide as he could.Five. Five fingers, one for each victory in the Preakness . Yesterday's victory aboard 8-1 Louis Quatorze was Day's third in a row. And that ended another streak -- six straight wins in Triple Crown races by trainer D. Wayne Lukas. In this, there is great irony. Lukas bumped Day off one of his Preakness horses, Prince of Thieves.
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FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | June 13, 1991
* ''Robin Hood, Prince of Thieves'' The much-awaited film in which Kevin Costner is the bandit chief who takes from the poor and gives to the rich. Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio is Maid Marian, and Alan Rickman is the evil sheriff of Nottingham.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1996
Anyone who expected Pat Day to show rancor at being yanked off one of the Preakness favorites, Prince of Thieves, doesn't know Pat Day.Day, the jockey on the winning horse of the 121st Preakness, Louis Quatorze, and the whole gang involved with the horse were just delirious that things broke their way yesterday at Pimllico.The win was Day's fifth Preakness victory in 11 tries, including three in a row. Imagine not wanting this guy on your horse heading to Baltimore from Louisville, Ky.Of trainer D. Wayne Lukas' maneuver to replace Day on Prince of Thieves with Jerry Bailey, after Bailey lost derby winner Grindstone to an injury and retirement, Day replied, "I've been taken off horses plenty of times.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1996
Jerry Bailey, universally applauded for his brilliant ride on Kentucky Derby winner Grindstone, will compete in the Preakness.Bailey has accepted the mount on the Derby's third-place finisher, Prince of Thieves, after Grindstone was retired last week because of a chip in his knee.The two are familiar with each other. Bailey rode Prince of Thieves in the colt's maiden victory."I told Wayne [trainer D. Wayne Lukas] I'd pay my way anywhere to ride the horse," Bailey said of Prince of Thieves.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1996
After the Kentucky Derby, after jockey Jerry Bailey expertly guided Grindstone past 12 horses in the thrilling final half mile, D. Wayne Lukas described the ride as "textbook, one for the highlight films."A week later, after a knee injury had forced Grindstone's retirement and left Bailey without a Preakness mount, Lukas reacted. The trainer bumped Pat Day, one of the nation's top jockeys and winner of the past two Preaknesses, off Prince of Thieves and put Bailey on instead."Jerry absolutely seems to be in the zone right now," said Lukas, a former basketball coach.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1996
Anyone who expected Pat Day to show rancor at being yanked off one of the Preakness favorites, Prince of Thieves, doesn't know Pat Day.Day, the jockey on the winning horse of the 121st Preakness, Louis Quatorze, and the whole gang involved with the horse were just delirious that things broke their way yesterday at Pimllico.The win was Day's fifth Preakness victory in 11 tries, including three in a row. Imagine not wanting this guy on your horse heading to Baltimore from Louisville, Ky.Of trainer D. Wayne Lukas' maneuver to replace Day on Prince of Thieves with Jerry Bailey, after Bailey lost derby winner Grindstone to an injury and retirement, Day replied, "I've been taken off horses plenty of times.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1996
The longest winning streak in Triple Crown history ended yesterday for D. Wayne Lukas, not with a whimper, but a controversy of his own making.The streak spanned three years, four horses and six Triple Crown races. When Lukas' run to glory finally ended where it started, in the Preakness, the country's hottest trainer was left to contemplate his place in history."I've had a hell of a run, better than anybody in the country, and I appreciate that," Lukas said after his three-horse entry failed to win the Preakness.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | May 18, 1996
First, the good news: The Preakness is on today at Pimlico.You might have taken that for granted, but things were getting a little hairy with only one horse in the stakes barn as recently as Wednesday morning.Fortunately, the rest of the field has made it to the track just in time, blowing into town in their various planes, trains and automobiles.A couple of late entries might have to chopper in over the infield during the post parade to make it in time, but they'll make it. They promised.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 17, 1996
The sun never broke through yesterday afternoon, but you knew the clouds couldn't hold it back for long, because D. Wayne Lukas and Sonny Hine had arrived.The Preakness finally got a breath of life when Lukas, the most recognizable trainer in the business, and Hine, perhaps the most likable, pulled up to Pimlico's stakes barn, followed by their horses in huge vans the equivalent of stretch limousines."We like it here in Baltimore. Baltimore's been good to us," said Lukas, after situating his six horses -- including his Preakness trio -- in stakes barn stalls.
SPORTS
May 19, 1996
After crossing the finish line, after one streak had ended and another one had been extended, Pat Day fired his left fist into the air. He spread his fingers as wide as he could.Five.Five fingers, one for each victory in the Preakness.Yesterday's victory aboard 8-1 Louis Quatorze was Day's third in a row. And that ended another streak -- six straight wins in Triple Crown races by trainer D. Wayne Lukas.In this, there is great irony. Lukas bumped Day off one of his Preakness horses, Prince of Thieves.
NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1996
The sun broke through early in the afternoon, well in time to provide a perfect backdrop for the 121st running of the Preakness Stakes. Then, it was just a matter of coming up with a perfect ending.Federal worker and once-a-year race buff Joe Paslow-ski of Alexandria, Va., said that had to involve jockey Pat Day. Said so as he was counting his money next to the ticket window on the second level of the Pimlico grandstand yesterday."I liked the name of the horse, and I liked the fact that Pat Day was on him," Paslowski said.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1996
The longest winning streak in Triple Crown history ended yesterday for D. Wayne Lukas, not with a whimper, but a controversy of his own making.The streak spanned three years, four horses and six Triple Crown races. When Lukas' run to glory finally ended where it started, in the Preakness, the country's hottest trainer was left to contemplate his place in history."I've had a hell of a run, better than anybody in the country, and I appreciate that," Lukas said after his three-horse entry failed to win the Preakness.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | May 18, 1996
First, the good news: The Preakness is on today at Pimlico.You might have taken that for granted, but things were getting a little hairy with only one horse in the stakes barn as recently as Wednesday morning.Fortunately, the rest of the field has made it to the track just in time, blowing into town in their various planes, trains and automobiles.A couple of late entries might have to chopper in over the infield during the post parade to make it in time, but they'll make it. They promised.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 17, 1996
The sun never broke through yesterday afternoon, but you knew the clouds couldn't hold it back for long, because D. Wayne Lukas and Sonny Hine had arrived.The Preakness finally got a breath of life when Lukas, the most recognizable trainer in the business, and Hine, perhaps the most likable, pulled up to Pimlico's stakes barn, followed by their horses in huge vans the equivalent of stretch limousines."We like it here in Baltimore. Baltimore's been good to us," said Lukas, after situating his six horses -- including his Preakness trio -- in stakes barn stalls.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1996
With Unbridled's Song out, Kentucky Derby runner-up Cavonnier loomed as the favorite for Saturday's 121st Preakness Stakes.Yesterday, his odds may have dropped a little further.The California gelding landed in the No. 2 spot at the post-position draw, seemingly an ideal place for a versatile horse who can run several ways."Its a good spot," said trainer Bob Baffert. "You don't have to ask him too much from there and he's always run well in the past from the inside. But you've still got to get the trip."
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1996
With the 121st running of the Preakness Stakes five days away, the stakes barn at Pimlico is eerily silent, the field still is taking shape and the status of possible favorite Unbridled's Song again has changed.After he finished fifth as the favorite in the Kentucky Derby, his handlers said he would not race again until his foot had healed and could tolerate regular shoes.Last week, the colt's owner, Ernie Paragallo, said Unbridled's Song almost certainly would not run in the Preakness. But yesterday, the trainer, Jim Ryerson, said from his barn at Monmouth Park, where Unbridled's Song is stabled, that the Preakness still is a possibility.
NEWS
By New York Times | July 17, 1991
JUST AS Saddam Hussein keeps promising to open Iraq's nuclear weapons facilities to inspection, his officials keep promising to return treasures stripped from Kuwait's National Museum. Last September, Iraqi soldiers made off with 17 truckloads of mostly Islamic art, the cream of a collection valued at $1 billion.What was left was mostly plundered or destroyed by Iraqi troops who torched the museum's galleries, thus gutting Kuwait's past with the same spiteful pyromania they directed against Kuwait's oilfields.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1996
After the Kentucky Derby, after jockey Jerry Bailey expertly guided Grindstone past 12 horses in the thrilling final half mile, D. Wayne Lukas described the ride as "textbook, one for the highlight films."A week later, after a knee injury had forced Grindstone's retirement and left Bailey without a Preakness mount, Lukas reacted. The trainer bumped Pat Day, one of the nation's top jockeys and winner of the past two Preaknesses, off Prince of Thieves and put Bailey on instead."Jerry absolutely seems to be in the zone right now," said Lukas, a former basketball coach.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1996
With the 121st running of the Preakness Stakes five days away, the stakes barn at Pimlico is eerily silent, the field still is taking shape and the status of possible favorite Unbridled's Song again has changed.After he finished fifth as the favorite in the Kentucky Derby, his handlers said he would not race again until his foot had healed and could tolerate regular shoes.Last week, the colt's owner, Ernie Paragallo, said Unbridled's Song almost certainly would not run in the Preakness. But yesterday, the trainer, Jim Ryerson, said from his barn at Monmouth Park, where Unbridled's Song is stabled, that the Preakness still is a possibility.
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