Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPrimehealth
IN THE NEWS

Primehealth

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1997
PrimeHealth Corp., a start-up health maintenance organization based in Lanham, has won state approval to serve Medicaid recipients.About 330,000 Medicaid enrollees, primarily mothers on welfare and their children, are being required to choose HMOs or other managed-care programs. Three other HMOs and three hospital-affiliated health systems have already been approved by the state as eligible managed-care organizations.Certified to operate as an HMO in September, PrimeHealth now has about 4,000 members in the District of Columbia and is just getting started in Maryland, said Ed Thomas, president and chief operating officer.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2003
The state's insurance commissioner cannot be sued for defamation for making statements and releasing documents related to an investigation, the state's highest court ruled in a unanimous opinion released yesterday. The case stems from a 1998 probe conducted by then-Insurance Commissioner Steven B. Larsen into PrimeHealth Corp., a health maintenance organization. Larsen expressed concerns about PrimeHealth's finances, and ultimately the state placed the insolvent HMO in receivership. Dr. Christian Chinwuba, a radiologist and owner of PrimeHealth, sued Larsen for defamation and invasion of privacy, in a claim centering on Larsen's release to the press of three letters he had written to PrimeHealth.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1999
The Maryland insurance commissioner has asked a Circuit Court judge for permission to fire four top executives of PrimeHealth Corp., the Lanham health care company at the center of the scandal surrounding former state Sen. Larry Young.In a petition filed in Baltimore Circuit Court, Commissioner Steven B. Larsen contends the services of the executives, three vice presidents and a general counsel are no longer needed and their salaries -- each makes about $100,000 per year -- are depleting the assets of the health maintenance organization.
NEWS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2001
A Baltimore Circuit Court judge approved yesterday a deal for another health plan to take over the patients and physician network of PrimeHealth Corp., which has been in receivership for 2 1/2 years. The approval by Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan came despite the objections of PrimeHealth's owners and a last-minute higher bid from another insurer. State Insurance Commissioner Steven B. Larsen, the receiver who has been running PrimeHealth, sought Kaplan's permission to turn over PrimeHealth's Medicaid patients to Americaid, which covers about 100,000 Medicaid members in the state, in return for $630,000, which would go to PrimeHealth creditors.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1998
An official of a Lanham-based health care firm was questioned for nearly an hour yesterday after delivering a handful of documents to the federal grand jury probing corruption charges against former state Sen. Larry Young.The unidentified representative of PrimeHealth Corp. arrived at the federal court building at 1: 30 p.m. carrying the documents. He emerged from the grand jury room at one point to confer briefly with Thurman W. Zollicoffer Jr., a lawyer representing the firm. Both Zollicoffer and the health-firm official declined to comment.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1998
Maryland insurance officials said yesterday that they will spend the weekend reviewing documents delivered by PrimeHealth Corp. to determine whether the Lanham-based company should continue to operate in Maryland as a health maintenance organization.In the midst of two grand jury investigations of former Sen. Larry Young and his ties to health companies such as PrimeHealth, the Maryland Insurance Administration ordered a sweeping review of the company last month.Young and others lobbied top state officials in an effort to get for PrimeHealth a contract from the health department, which sought a state rule change and a federal waiver that enabled the company to work in Maryland.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1998
Maryland officials say they have reviewed contingency plans to ensure about 12,300 Medicaid recipients will keep health coverage and that their medical bills will continue to be paid if the operating license for PrimeHealth Corp. of Lanham is revoked.Martin P. Wasserman, the state's health secretary, said the contingency plans were discussed last week in a meeting between his agency and state Insurance Commissioner Steven B. Larsen, who has given PrimeHealth until Wednesday to begin answering a series of detailed questions about the company, its ownership and its debts.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | February 26, 1998
State Insurance Commissioner Steven B. Larsen said yesterday he has ordered a sweeping review of the legal status of PrimeHealth Corp., an HMO licensed by his agency that won a multimillion-dollar state contract and has come under scrutiny by two grand juries investigating former Sen. Larry Young.Larsen, who took over as commissioner after the Lanham-based company received its license in 1996, also acknowledged that Friendship LLC -- a Nevada-based corporation that owns 100 percent of PrimeHealth's stock -- has lost its corporate charter, leaving the HMO's legal status in Maryland uncertain.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2000
State health and insurance officials disclosed yesterday plans to sell the health care business at the center of the failed bribery case against former state Sen. Larry Young to a Prince George's County physicians group, which apparently forfeited its corporate charter last year. In a joint announcement that gave scant details, Insurance Commissioner Steven B. Larsen and Health Secretary Dr. Georges C. Benjamin said PrimeHealth Corp. in Lanham will be sold to Universal Health Plan. The sale is subject to the negotiation of a final sales agreement and approval of that agreement by a Baltimore City Circuit judge.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1999
The Maryland Insurance Administration has reached a settlement agreement with four top executives of the Lanham-based health maintenance organization that was placed in receivership last year in the wake of an investigation of former state Sen. Larry Young. Under the agreement reached late Tuesday, the four executives of PrimeHealth Corp. will continue to be paid through July. Court records indicate that each is earning about $100,000 a year. The settlement applies to three vice presidents, Wayne Clarke, Anthony Isama and R. Glenn Beatty, and the company's general counsel, Leonard McCants.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2001
A Baltimore Circuit Court judge will hear a last-minute plea tomorrow to block the sale of PrimeHealth Corp., which serves 19,000 patients and has been in receivership for more than two years. In a motion filed Friday, lawyers for the original owners of the Lanham managed-care company argued that the pending sale could jeopardize the patients' health care. According to the petition, a sale to Amerigroup Inc., a Prime- Health competitor, is about to be finalized. A spokeswoman for the Maryland Insurance Administration said the agency will respond to the request for a preliminary injunction at the hearing before Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2001
Raising concerns among patient advocates, Maryland's insurance commissioner says he wants to close PrimeHealth Corp., a troubled HMO that was at the center of a corruption case involving former state Sen. Larry Young. Citing projected losses of at least $1.7 million, Commissioner Steven B. Larsen told a Circuit Court judge in a letter that he wants to shut down the company -which serves 22,000 low income residents - to protect the rights of creditors who are owed some $9 million. The letter, dated Feb. 12, was made public yesterday.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2000
A Baltimore Circuit Court judge has rejected a request to end the receivership of a health maintenance organization but chided state insurance officials for failing to file tax returns and collect $500,000 owed the firm. In an 11-page ruling, Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan denied a motion by Christian Chinwuba to end the receivership of PrimeHealth, a Lanham-based HMO that serves hundreds of low-income patients in the Baltimore area. Chinwuba, a radiologist who founded the health care company four years ago, had contended that state Insurance Commissioner Steven B. Larsen never had the right to take control of the company and that, in any case, it was no longer insolvent.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2000
It was late in the afternoon on a chilly fall day in Annapolis, and the bareheaded man in the nearly deserted McDonald's sat by himself, huddled for warmth over a cup of coffee. He had found quiet refuge after walking through a mass of reporters and photographers gathered at the nearby courthouse for the corruption trial of a former state senator. Surprised at being recognized, he smiled. "Some day," he said quietly, "Some day, I will tell you the whole story." Christian E. Chinwuba, star witness in the 1999 trial of former state Sen. Larry Young, might have slipped away from the television cameras that afternoon a year ago, but he hasn't stepped aside.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2000
The founders of a health maintenance organization taken over by the Maryland Insurance Administration are questioning some of the $1.5 million in "administrative costs" incurred by state consultants in the past two years. During a receivership hearing this week before Baltimore Circuit Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan, lawyers for the former operators of PrimeHealth Corp. challenged consultants over spending, including nearly $100,000 on items such as lawn mowing and house cleaning. Goldmark Friendship, the holding company for PrimeHealth, issued a statement yesterday on the spending.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2000
Four legislators, including Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, urged the Glendening administration to proceed with a now abandoned plan to sell a troubled health maintenance organization to a group of Prince George's County physicians. News of the letter written on behalf of the physicians' Universal Health Plan prompted PrimeHealth founder Christian Chinwuba to charge through a spokesman that politics has dictated the state's treatment of his company. Tori Leonard, a spokeswoman for the Insurance Administration, said this week that the letter did not affect the process.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1998
As claims of bribery and falsified financial records swirled around PrimeHealth Corp., an official of the Lanham-based company spent more than two hours yesterday testifying before a federal grand jury probing corruption charges against former state Sen. Larry Young.Ndukwe Emeruwa went before the grand jury in Baltimore at 1: 20 p.m. and did not emerge until 3: 50 p.m. In between, Emeruwa consulted with his attorney and returned to the grand jury with an armful of records, including what appeared to be corporate check registers.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1998
In an effort to keep its state license and a coveted multimillion-dollar state contract, lawyers for PrimeHealth Corp. announced yesterday that its principal owner had resigned from the board of directors and placed his stock in a blind trust.In a letter to state Insurance Commissioner Steven B. Larsen, PrimeHealth attorney Warren N. Weaver said that Dr. Christian E. Chinwuba, who owns 81 percent of the Prince George's County company, "no longer exercises any degree of control" over the operation of the health maintenance organization.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2000
Under mounting pressure and facing growing criticism, the state insurance commissioner abruptly reversed himself yesterday, canceling plans to sell a troubled health maintenance organization to a group of minority physicians for $2 million. Commissioner Steven B. Larsen said he abandoned the sale plan because the physicians' group, Universal Health Plan of Lanham, had failed to disclose important financial details when it submitted its final bid earlier this year. The financial information that led to the cancellation was disclosed by Universal after the proposed sale had been filed and announced, he said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.