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By Bill Carter and Bill Carter,New York Times | April 6, 1992
NEW YORK -- Just how much news can television use?As the network news divisions add programs from early morning through the entire night and continue to seek the financial advantages of using news programs instead of increasingly costly entertainment shows, the limit to the air time available to these programs appears to be nowhere in sight.All three big networks now have all-night newscasts. In the fall, NBC will break the Saturday morning tradition of children's cartoon shows to add a Saturday version of "Today," a move that most analysts expect will be highly successful among adults.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
If it's true that a society is known by its most popular artifacts, we are becoming a culture of comic books and games. Our biggest film and TV characters are based on comic book super heroes and villains, while our real life heroes are professional athletes. Watching tonight's premiere of “Gotham,” I couldn't help feeling that if there was any new series that would probably crack Nielsen's Top 10 this fall alongside all the different primetime NFL games and pre-game shows, it would be this one from Fox. You tell me if that's a good or bad thing.
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NEWS
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2010
There's a new king of prime time this fall, and for the first time in television history it's not a sitcom, drama or reality show. It's football: " NBC Sunday Night Football," which debuted two weeks ago to record ratings that placed it atop the Nielsen standings. The franchise that bills itself as "Football Night in America" and opens each week with Faith Hill singing that she's "been waitin' all day for Sunday night" is the most valuable property in prime time, having finished last fall as the No. 1 show with young viewers, beating such competition as "Dancing with the Stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
NBC News and anchorman Brian Williams have not done journalistic work the quality of Wednesday night's exclusive interview with Edward Snowden in a long, long time. Since NBC News had the interview for a week, according to Williams, it could have done more reporting on some of Snowden's statements. For example, he said he was not merely a systems analyst or the "hacker" as President Obama dismissively characterized him, but rather an employee of the Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency trained as a traditional spy. He said he worked overseas under fake names in cover occupations for both agencies.
NEWS
December 11, 2013
Before The Sun and its readers start hyperventilating about the Maryland Department of Agriculture's decision to delay (not abandon) the proposed Phosphorous Management Tool regulation, it is important to share some insights into this common-sense decision ("Phosphorous rules delayed," Nov. 22). First, the department's actions are not rolling back any environmental protection program. Since 2005, farmers throughout the state have had state-mandated limits on the amount of phosphorus they can apply to their land, whether it is animal manure or commercial fertilizer.
SPORTS
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2010
When the NFL draft crosses the threshold into prime-time television Thursday night in New York's Radio City Music Hall, commissioner Roger Goodell will usher in a new era of marketing glitz. Never before has so much been made of a college athlete's future. There will be more eyes on Goodell at the podium for his announcement of the first pick ( "The St. Louis Rams select quarterback Sam Bradford of Oklahoma" ) than for any commissioner in the past, and a record 39 million viewers watched some part of the 2009 draft on NFL Network or ESPN.
SPORTS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2012
NBC will air a one-hour look at the career of Michael Phelps at 7 tonight, the network announced late Saturday night. "Michael Phelps: America's Golden Champion" will feature what the NBC Sports is calling an "exclusive" interview by Bob Costas done with the Phelps at the end of his final day of competition Saturday. "America's greatest interviewer sitting down with the world's greatest Olympic champion makes for an inspiring piece of television," NBC Olympics executive producer Jim Bell said in a statement announcing the prime-time special.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2012
Barry Levinson and Tom Fontana, the executive producers of "Homicide: Life on the Street," return to prime time tonight on BBC America with "Copper," starring Tom Weston-Jones. (That's Weston-Jones sitting with them in the picture above, taken in California where they were promoting the series.) Set in 1864 in New York, the series is cop drama meets frontier saga, and I like it. I loved "Homicide," "Oz" and Levinson's last TV effort, "You Don't Know Jack," a docu-drama look at Dr. Jack Kevorkian, starring Al Pacino, for HBO. But I hated "The Jury," a series the duo did for Fox. They've had some failed projects since "Homicide" and "Oz," but I think "Copper" could be a winner.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2012
I did not think I'd ever see a better medical documentary series than the Emmy-Award-winning “Hopkins 24/7” that aired in 2000 or its sequel, “Hopkins,” which won a Peabody Award in 2008. The backstage access, immediacy and range of gripping real-life drama that ABCNews Executive Producer Terence Wrong and his team captured at Baltimore's world-renowned medical institution were landmark. But with “NY Med,” which premieres at 10 p.m. Tuesday, Wrong surpasses his earlier work in terms of prime-time storytelling without sacrificing any of the cultural seriousness or grand reach of the Hopkins series.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | December 5, 2009
It didn't take long for Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon to become a national TV punch line in the wake of her guilty verdict. Thursday night, NBC comedian Jay Leno made her part of his monologue. "I love this story," Leno said near the end of a prime-time monologue filled with jokes about Tiger Woods. "The mayor of Baltimore, a woman named Sheila Dixon, found guilty this week of embezzlement. The mayor! The mayor! Embezzlement for spending $1,000 worth of gift cards intended for the homeless on herself."
SPORTS
By David Selig and The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
Maryland's home football game against Michigan State on Nov. 15 will be a prime-time kickoff on the Big Ten Network. The network announced a six-game prime-time schedule Tuesday morning. It included an 8 p.m. start time for the Terps' game against the Spartans, last year's conference champions. It'll be the Maryland's first scheduled televised prime-time game since the Terps faced Notre Dame at FedEx Field on Nov. 12, 2011, and their first at Byrd Stadium since a game against Clemson on Oct. 15, 2011.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
In an effort to improve its last-place prime-time lineup, CNN is canceling Piers Morgan's nightly talk show. The cancellation, which was first reported by the New York Times, has been confirmed by CNN, though a date has yet to be set for when the former British tabloid editor will end his troubled run. Morgan was hired by Jonathan Klein, the predecessor of Jeff Zucker, who came into the top job at CNN with a mandate to improve ratings....
SPORTS
Mike Preston | December 17, 2013
Now, everyone will take the Ravens seriously. Of the three remaining games they had on the schedule, the Ravens won the toughest Monday night by beating the Lions 18-16 here in Detroit. The Lions aren't considered the best team in the NFL, not even the best team in the NFC North, but they play tough defense and they are hard to beat at Ford Field. It's Game On. The Ravens are back. They play the hated New England Patriots next week at M&T Bank Stadium, but the Ravens aren't afraid of the Patriots.
NEWS
December 11, 2013
Before The Sun and its readers start hyperventilating about the Maryland Department of Agriculture's decision to delay (not abandon) the proposed Phosphorous Management Tool regulation, it is important to share some insights into this common-sense decision ("Phosphorous rules delayed," Nov. 22). First, the department's actions are not rolling back any environmental protection program. Since 2005, farmers throughout the state have had state-mandated limits on the amount of phosphorus they can apply to their land, whether it is animal manure or commercial fertilizer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Appearing as Malik "Poot" Carr for five seasons on "The Wire," Tray Chaney enjoyed one of the longest lives any drug dealer has ever had in prime time. "I was so lucky in my very first acting role," says Chaney, now living in La Plata, Charles County. "You can't be any more blessed than that starting out. " He's intent on sharing some of that blessed feeling. The father of two runs a production company and has a new film coming out in December. He's promoting HIV testing for the Prince George's County Health Department and making appearances and a music video for United Way of Maryland.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | October 29, 2013
By any measure, the 2013 World Series should be a big television draw. The Boston Red Sox and St. Louis Cardinals are historic franchises with terrific national followings, and they're attractive teams with great pitching and plenty of interesting storylines. So why is this Fall Classic getting a relative ho-hum reaction from baseball fans, who are delivering another series of mediocre overnight TV ratings and appear to be spending more time at the water cooler actually drinking water than talking baseball?
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | January 15, 1994
Today's most enticing television is available before prime time (thanks to the football playoffs on NBC and CBS), after prime time (thanks to "Saturday Night Live"), or on cable -- thanks to HBO's "Comic Relief VI."* "AFC playoffs" (12:30 p.m.-conclusion, WMAR, Channel 2) -- The weather forecast up in Buffalo, where the Bills play the Los Angeles Raiders, calls for snow flurries, high wind and bitter cold -- the perfect kind of game to watch on TV. Marv Albert and Paul Maguire have booth duties.
NEWS
October 1, 2013
I am concerned by the way the Baltimore County schools are implementing the new Core Curriculum ( "Charges dropped against Maryland parent who spoke against Common Core standards," Sept. 23). Having retired after teaching mathematics in the county for 36 years, I know how the job of putting a new curriculum in place was handled in the past. Curriculum workshops were held in the summer. Teachers, department chairs and subject area supervisors worked to publish a workable guide for teachers.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2013
If the pilot of cop show "Brooklyn Nine-Nine" is any indication, police captain Ray Holt is well on his way to joining the pantheon of well-realized LGBT characters on network TV. It's not that Holt ( portrayed by "Homicide" alum Andre Braugher ) is particularly central to the new Fox sitcom. That honor rests with Andy Samberg, who plays immature-but-brilliant Brooklyn detective Jake Peralta. "Brooklyn Nine-Nine" is built around the actor's well-proven hyperactive humor, albeit a little more restrained.
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