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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 28, 1994
How good is "Prime Suspect 3," the new Jane Tennison murder mystery?Good enough that I intended to watch only the first two hours over the weekend, and ended up in a miniseries marathon -- watching non-stop all six hours.My errands went undone, my weeds went unwhacked.It's a terrific series, as good as the two previous outings by Helen Mirren as the British cop, Detective Chief Inspector Tennison. As an actress, Mirren is in the league of Glenn Close and Meryl Streep. In her hands, Tennison becomes the most interesting, edgy and realistic female character anywhere on American television.
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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | December 10, 2007
You gave Barack Obama a breakfast, Mr. Mayor, but you're giving us a lunch!" said I to Mike Bloomberg, adding, "And we're not even running for anything."
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By David Zurawik | January 23, 1992
PRIME SUSPECT" is the TV thriller of the year.The four-part British-import, which premieres tonight at 9 on Channels 22 and 67, has memorable characters, rich detail of cops in squad rooms and bedrooms -- and it just never lets up in the suspense department. One other thing: "Prime Suspect" is surely the most intelligent and multifaceted dramatic exploration sexism ever seen on American television. Ever.There is a murder and an investigation to find the murderer. This is, after all, part of the PBS "Mystery" lineup.
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By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | March 13, 2007
MARPINGEN, Germany -- The snapshots show a family across an ocean in a foreign city called Baltimore. There is Denise Brown, thin and pretty with her dark hair pulled back, alongside her father, Robert L. Brown Jr. There is Denise's aunt, cheek to smiling cheek with her uncle. There is a gaggle of cousins, and her grandmother, in a silly purple wig. It was about a half-dozen years ago when Denise Brown, now 25, last saw her American father, a man who was in and out - but mostly out - of her life since childhood.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | January 8, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- Don't tell Helen Mirren her character, Detective Chief Inspector Jane Tennison, is unhappy with her career-driven life.One male reporter made that mistake during a press conference here to promote "Prime Suspect 3," which will air on PBS in April.'Do you really think she's unhappy?" Mirren asked the reporter."Yes," the reporter replied."Yeah, sure, well, that's because you're a man, you know. Hey, she's unmarried. She doesn't have a baby. She must be unhappy, right?" Mirren said.
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By David Zurawik | January 23, 1992
PRIME SUSPECT" is the TV thriller of the year.The four-part British-import, which premieres tonight at 9 on Channels 22 and 67, has memorable characters, rich detail of cops in squad rooms and bedrooms -- and it just never lets up in the suspense department. One other thing: "Prime Suspect" is surely the most intelligent and multifaceted dramatic exploration of sexism ever seen on American television. Ever.There is a murder and an investigation to find the murderer. This is, after all, part of the PBS "Mystery" lineup.
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By Robin Dougherty and Robin Dougherty,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 21, 1995
Who's the most likable pain in the neck on public television?You'd be right if you guessed Jane Tennison, deputy inspector and star of "Prime Suspect," the boffo detective series starring erstwhile Royal Shakespeare Company ingenue Helen Mirren.Tennison's career -- as the brilliant and frequently obnoxious female detective who infiltrates the all-male world of the London police -- starts a new chapter with "Prime Suspect 4: The Lost Child" (tomorrow at 9 p.m. on MPT, Channels 22, 67), in a single, two-hour episode.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 28, 2005
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - A prime suspect in the kidnapping and killing of Daniel Pearl was arrested yesterday by Pakistani intelligence agents, officials said. Mohammad Hashim Qadeer is accused of arranging a first meeting between Pearl and Ahmed Omar Saeed Sheikh at a hotel in Rawalpindi, a city near the capital of Islamabad. Pearl, a reporter for The Wall Street Journal, was later lured by Sheikh to a January 2002 meeting in the southern port city of Karachi, where he was abducted and, eventually, beheaded.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 18, 2004
Thank goodness for British television drama. Though American networks have all but switched from making new (costly) dramas to pumping out (cheaper) reality TV shows, the British are sticking to what they've done well for decades. After a week of Trump-mania - and the finale of NBC's The Apprentice - tonight's premiere of two soul-stirring, brain-engaging, multipart dramas from the other side of the Atlantic could not be more welcome. It has been seven years since Helen Mirren's landmark character, Inspector Jane Tennison of Prime Suspect fame, first solved a case for the London Metropolitan Police.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | March 13, 2007
MARPINGEN, Germany -- The snapshots show a family across an ocean in a foreign city called Baltimore. There is Denise Brown, thin and pretty with her dark hair pulled back, alongside her father, Robert L. Brown Jr. There is Denise's aunt, cheek to smiling cheek with her uncle. There is a gaggle of cousins, and her grandmother, in a silly purple wig. It was about a half-dozen years ago when Denise Brown, now 25, last saw her American father, a man who was in and out - but mostly out - of her life since childhood.
NEWS
By Robert Lloyd and Robert Lloyd,Los Angeles Times | November 12, 2006
DSI Jane Tennison, the Scotland Yard detective played by Helen Mirren in the Prime Suspect series, returns for the last time tonight, in the terminally titled Prime Suspect 7: The Final Act. That the actress and role are together again - and for the last time - qualifies this as a television event, and it does not disappoint. "Satisfying" might not be the right word for a film whose apportioning of pain and loss and rain-bitten gloom is so pervasive, but it doesn't violate the spirit of the series or of its perennially half-triumphant heroine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 11, 2006
The script offered only five words of instruction: "Brenda looks in desk drawer." But actress Kyra Sedgwick, star of TNT's hit drama The Closer, transforms the mundane direction into a scene fraught with human complexities, frailties and obsessions. For two long minutes, her character, Los Angeles Police Deputy Chief Brenda Leigh Johnson, first steals quick glances, then gazes longingly at the drawer. Finally, Johnson, a veteran detective with an uncanny ability to elicit confessions from the most hardened criminals, yanks open the drawer and lunges at a vending-machine snack cake that's lying inside it. With abandon, she rips through the cellophane and into the sugar-laced confection with one reckless bite.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 28, 2005
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - A prime suspect in the kidnapping and killing of Daniel Pearl was arrested yesterday by Pakistani intelligence agents, officials said. Mohammad Hashim Qadeer is accused of arranging a first meeting between Pearl and Ahmed Omar Saeed Sheikh at a hotel in Rawalpindi, a city near the capital of Islamabad. Pearl, a reporter for The Wall Street Journal, was later lured by Sheikh to a January 2002 meeting in the southern port city of Karachi, where he was abducted and, eventually, beheaded.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 18, 2004
Thank goodness for British television drama. Though American networks have all but switched from making new (costly) dramas to pumping out (cheaper) reality TV shows, the British are sticking to what they've done well for decades. After a week of Trump-mania - and the finale of NBC's The Apprentice - tonight's premiere of two soul-stirring, brain-engaging, multipart dramas from the other side of the Atlantic could not be more welcome. It has been seven years since Helen Mirren's landmark character, Inspector Jane Tennison of Prime Suspect fame, first solved a case for the London Metropolitan Police.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 24, 2002
SUN SCORE * 1/2 (one and 1/2 star) In a final Saturday Night Live so funny it almost redeemed the season, Will Ferrell's Fidel Castro embarrassed Darrell Hammond's Jimmy Carter by bringing up "stagflation": an economic state that combines stagnation and inflation. Stagflation occurred in the American economy only under Carter, but in American movies it happens all the time - especially in Hollywood remakes of foreign thrillers. Cameron Crowe's Vanilla Sky, for example, attached 18 extra minutes to the Spanish hit Open Your Eyes without opening up the convoluted plot.
NEWS
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 16, 1997
MIAMI -- Gianni Versace, a king of the fashion world whose flamboyant designs helped build a global empire, was killed yesterday on the steps of his palatial villa in chic South Beach.Police said they have a prime suspect in the case, Andrew Phillip Cunanan, one of the country's most wanted fugitives, who is already a suspect in four other slayings.Versace was shot twice in the head as he returned from an early morning walk to buy magazines.More than 12 hours later, Miami Beach police Chief Richard Barreto identified the suspect as Cunanan, 27, who was being sought in the slayings of four men from Minneapolis to New Jersey.
NEWS
By Robert Lloyd and Robert Lloyd,Los Angeles Times | November 12, 2006
DSI Jane Tennison, the Scotland Yard detective played by Helen Mirren in the Prime Suspect series, returns for the last time tonight, in the terminally titled Prime Suspect 7: The Final Act. That the actress and role are together again - and for the last time - qualifies this as a television event, and it does not disappoint. "Satisfying" might not be the right word for a film whose apportioning of pain and loss and rain-bitten gloom is so pervasive, but it doesn't violate the spirit of the series or of its perennially half-triumphant heroine.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1996
On Feb. 5, 1995, Tangie Thompson, her 3-year-old son, Devyn, and her fiance, Andre White, were murdered in New Orleans, their bodies riddled with 14 shots from a 9 mm semiautomatic pistol.Bennie Thompson of the Cleveland Browns was left to mourn the deaths of his child and ex-wife in his hometown -- and to be a prime suspect in their killings."There were and still are no words," said Thompson, 33. "Devastated would not begin to tell how I felt. How could anyone shoot a 3-year-old eight times?
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1997
As an environmental detective of sorts, Hugh Granger has seen this kind of baffling case before. And after two weeks of testing, exploring, cleaning and venting by a variety of doctors, engineers and hygienists, he's developed a theory of what's been sending waves of people to the hospital during the past 15 days at the George H. Fallon Federal Building.The initial culprit, Granger believes, was fumes seeping into the first floor from outside, perhaps from resurfacing going on just outside the building.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 2, 1996
When NBC announced that Tom Fontana, the executive producer of "Homicide," was working on a courtroom drama with Lynda La Plante, the British writer who created "Prime Suspect," it sounded like a dream marriage between the mother of Jane Tennison and the father of Frank Pembleton.The first-born of that union arrives tonight as a made-for-television movie, "The Prosecutors," and, sad to say, it is one of those projects that sounded so much better on paper than it looks on screen.The biggest disappointment is that, while it's billed by NBC as a "movie about the lives of three women who work in the New York City district attorney's office," La Plante offers nothing new or interesting in terms of images of feminine identity.
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