Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPrimates
IN THE NEWS

Primates

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 31, 1995
PHILADELPHIA -- Many of the melancholy bouquets delivered to the Philadelphia Zoo last week are adorned with little bananas and apples, symbolic gifts to the 23 gorillas and gibbons, lemurs and orangutans that died Christmas Eve in the country's worst calamity for zoo animals.Not quite human, the simian families that perished from a smoky fire have left behind not only an aching grief but also potentially irreparable holes in the gene pool for the country's primate population."I cannot think of anything comparable to this loss in North America," said Kevin Willis, a conservation biologist at the American Zoo and Aquarium Association.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
Officials at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore are investigating the death of a middle-aged female chimpanzee that was found lifeless in an enclosure early Wednesday morning, several hours after being anesthetized for a scheduled physical exam. Whether the anesthesia was a factor in the animal's death will be reviewed as part of a necropsy, or animal autopsy, zoo officials said. The 21-year-old primate, named Renee, was among the first group of chimpanzees to inhabit the zoo's Chimpanzee Forest following its opening in 1995.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Valerie Feldner and Valerie Feldner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 11, 2002
Her job description might be "trying to save the world." She spends almost 300 days of the year on the road lobbying, lecturing, fund-raising, educating and overseeing conservation projects, and is remarkably chipper, considering the state of the planet. At 68, Jane Goodall still looks like the ponytailed young woman who, 39 years ago, came into our living rooms in a National Geographic documentary about her groundbreaking study of a chimpanzee troupe in Gombe National Park in what is now called Tanzania.
NEWS
December 23, 2011
Dogs may be a man's best friend, but on the great evolutionary chain, chimpanzees are humanity's closest relatives in the animal world. Chimps are so much like us physically, emotionally and socially that for decades researchers routinely used them as surrogates to test new surgical procedures, evaluate the effectiveness of drugs and vaccines, and develop other therapeutic breakthroughs before trying them out on humans. That research has been instrumental in advancing scientific knowledge and the search for new treatments and medicines to prevent life-threatening and debilitating diseases.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1996
When Carrie Gardner hears the name Jane Goodall, she thinks immediately of one thing."Baby chimpanzees," said the 13-year-old seventh-grader at Magothy River Middle School in Arnold. "With big smiles on their faces."Carrie and about 300 of her classmates got to meet the woman who helped change the way humans look at chimpanzees yesterday when Dr. Goodall visited the school.The pioneering primate researcher, who will lecture tonight at George Washington University's Lizner Auditorium, spent about an hour showing the children slides taken during more than 30 years of studying and caring for wild chimpanzees in Gombe, a remote town on the eastern shore of Lake Tanganyika in Tanzania.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2011
A baby Drill monkey holds on to its mother, Nora, at Edinburgh Zoo in Scotland. The baby monkey, which was born in August, is the first drill monkey birth at the zoo. Drills are the rarest and most endangered primates in Africa.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 14, 1996
PHILADELPHIA - The fire that left 23 primates dead of smoke inhalation at the Philadelphia Zoo in December was caused by an improperly installed heating cable in the roof of their quarters, not by questionable actions of guards that night, zoo officials said yesterday.In presenting the results of two internal investigations one by zoo staff members, the other by zoo board members the officials said the reports agreed with the major findings of the Philadelphia Fire Department's investigation, announced last month, that the fire "was accidental in nature" and that the zoo's security and fire detection systems were working properly at the time.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2002
Frisky's Wildlife and Primate Sanctuary can stay in Woodstock but its monkeys must be out in four years, a Howard County panel has decided. The vote -- which pleased neither Frisky's longtime manager nor the next-door neighbors opposed to the primates -- came after 27 months of hearings to decide the fate of the private shelter, which was operating without land-use approval. "I'm devastated, I'm totally devastated," said Colleen Layton, who runs the sanctuary from her 3.7-acre home. "Phasing us out, I could have handled, where you get no more, or `you have so many years to do something about the macaque monkeys' -- but all of them?"
NEWS
By Lorraine Gingerich and Lorraine Gingerich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 9, 2001
HOW MANY of us can say we're doing what we love to do with our lives? Colleen Layton, of Frisky's Wildlife and Primate Sanctuary, is one of those lucky people. Layton takes in squirrels, rabbits, turtles and birds that are injured, orphaned or being stalked by predators and nurses them back to health at her Woodstock refuge. She is not paid for the work she does. "I fall in love with them," Layton said. "I would love to snuggle-buggle with a lot of these animals and I know it's not the best, so I don't do it."
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2002
Frisky's Wildlife and Primate Sanctuary can stay in Woodstock but its monkeys must be out in four years, a Howard County panel has decided. The vote - which pleased neither the longtime Frisky's manager nor the next-door neighbors opposed to the primates - occurred after 27 months of hearings to decide the fate of the private shelter, which was operating without land-use approval. "I'm devastated, I'm totally devastated," said Colleen Layton, who runs the sanctuary from her 3.7-acre home.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2011
A baby Drill monkey holds on to its mother, Nora, at Edinburgh Zoo in Scotland. The baby monkey, which was born in August, is the first drill monkey birth at the zoo. Drills are the rarest and most endangered primates in Africa.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2011
Joseph Vincent Brady, a nationally and internationally known behavioral neuroscientist, behavioral pharmacologist and space researcher who established the department of behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died Friday of multiple organ failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Fells Point resident was 89. "Joe was an institution at Hopkins and made significant institutional changes both here and at Homewood. He was also the father of the complete treatment plan for patients with substance abuse," said Dr. J. Raymond DePaulo Jr., director of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Hopkins School of Medicine.
NEWS
By Phillip Atiba Goff and Jennifer L. Eberhardt | March 3, 2009
An apology has been issued. The protests are fading. And it may be tempting to dismiss the uproar over the provocative chimpanzee cartoon in The New York Post as just another "race card" dust-up. But that would obscure an underlying reality captured in the Post situation and demonstrated by research we have conducted: Some racial associations are embedded so deeply that they are difficult to recognize, much less eradicate - and they continue to shape our behavior and ideas. The Post cartoon depicted two police officers standing over a chimp they had shot dead in the street.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,sun reporter | March 4, 2007
Colleen Layton-Robbins has been caring for animals for more than 30 years and has a fondness for the dozens of monkeys at Frisky's Wildlife and Primate Sanctuary. "We get them healthy and get them through the adjustments of life. We just help them develop into thriving animals," said Layton-Robbins, director at the Woodstock facility off Route 99 near Marriottsville Road. "We want them to live a good life, and I am driven to that." But some of the sanctuary's neighbors say they believe the monkeys could carry diseases and that they pose a health risk.
NEWS
By Carrie Peyton Dahlberg and Carrie Peyton Dahlberg,McClatchy-Tribune | February 2, 2007
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- In a double row of cages at the University of California, Davis' primate center, families of little brown titi monkeys lead a peculiar life. Dad pretty much raises the kids. Mom tends to reject them, except at feeding time. Researchers are hoping this world of kindly dads and intolerant moms, of males who are merely attentive and others who've become downright clingy, can shed light on the biology underlying human behavior. "This is about as close as we can get to being related to us in an animal that's monogamous" and that can be studied easily in a lab, said Karen Bales, a UC Davis psychology professor.
NEWS
By SCOTT CALVERT and SCOTT CALVERT,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | July 16, 2006
MBONG, Cameroon -- Ask the villagers here, and they are unanimous: They hunt monkeys and other animals to feed their families, selling only the occasional catch to people passing through this part of west-central Africa. Villagers blame the declining numbers of monkeys, antelope-like duikers and other creatures squarely on commercial poachers who supply bushmeat to consumers in the cities and, to a surprising extent, around the world. "I'm worried," said Olivier Minko, who has noticed a decline in the number of animals in the past decade.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2002
Frisky's Wildlife and Primate Sanctuary can stay in Woodstock, but its monkeys must be out in four years, a Howard County panel has decided. The vote - which pleased neither the longtime Frisky's manager nor the next-door neighbors opposed to the primates - occurred after 27 months of hearings to decide the fate of the private shelter, which was operating without land-use approval. "I'm devastated, I'm totally devastated," said Colleen Layton, who runs the sanctuary from her 3.7-acre home.
FEATURES
By Frans B. M. de Waal and Frans B. M. de Waal,Los Angeles Times | December 28, 1994
While surgeons in Pittsburgh were transplanting the liver of a baboon into a man's body, animal activists at the hospital entrance were chanting, "Animals are no spare parts."Their protest was interrupted by Robert Winters, a patient on his way to a hepatitis treatment. Hepatitis attacks and destroys the liver. Starting up the steps, Mr. Winters shouted: "I didn't ask for this! But I've got it and I'm fighting it just like that guy [getting a transplant] up there! You don't have a right to be standing here!"
NEWS
By JESSE LEAVENWORTH and JESSE LEAVENWORTH,HARTFORD COURANT | May 12, 2006
Chimpanzees are supposed to be the "good" apes, cute and funny, the hairy little people depicted in thousands of films and TV shows. But recent news out of western Africa shows they can be brutally fierce. A chimp attacked and killed a Sierra Leone man who was driving Americans to a wildlife refuge last month. Another man lost part of his hand in the attack. Some news reports said a group of up to 20 chimps that had broken out of their enclosures gang-attacked the men, while other stories have pinned responsibility on one animal, possibly a chimp named Bruno, the undisputed alpha male of the Tacugama Chimpanzee Sanctuary.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.