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By GADY A. EPSTEIN and GADY A. EPSTEIN,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 2, 2002
BEIJING -- In a sixth-grade class at Liangxiang No. 3 Primary School, 51 pupils were analyzing a painting by Vincent van Gogh yesterday when the buzzer sounded to end the period. Time for everyone to join in the ritual rubbing of the eyes, a daily exercise for young students across China. In another classroom, 56 fourth-graders were enjoying reading time, but it was not exactly silent reading. Most read aloud at full volume, blissfully awash in the deafening sound of their own voices and waiting for the start of ceremonies marking the formal opening of school.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2012
The Harford County sheriff's office plans to have additional security Wednesday at five schools after a bomb threat was made. According to Capt. Keith Warner of the sheriff's office, the primary school mentioned in a threatening note was C. Milton Wright High School in Bel Air, which also had an unfounded bomb threat last week. Parents were notified Tuesday night that the school had been threatened again, according to schools spokeswoman Teri D. Kranefeld. Public high schools Aberdeen, Edgewood and Patterson Mill and the private John Carroll School were also mentioned in the note found at C. Milton Wright, Warner said.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2001
By all appearances it makes perfect sense to close Mildred D. Monroe Elementary School. A two-story brick building on a dirty section of Guilford Avenue near boarded-up homes and vacant warehouses, Mildred Monroe has only 172 pupils and is in poor condition. The city could save about $280,000 a year by shuttering it and moving the children five blocks north to Dallas F. Nicholas, one of the city's up-and-coming schools where children score at the state average. But parents say facts and figures can't describe the importance this tiny school holds for its pupils and the community.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,joseph.burris@baltsun.com | September 3, 2009
Many parents consider Patapsco State Park a leisure destination. Suzy Provine of Millersville views it as a classroom. As children headed back to local schools this week, she and her four sons explored the park's craggy earth and tossed large and small rocks into standing water to test the laws of gravity. Venues such as Patapsco are why Provine, 38, has never sent her children to traditional school, opting instead for an eclectic approach to learning known as unschooling. A byproduct of home schooling, unschooling incorporates every facet of a child's life into the education process, allowing a child to follow his passions and learn at his own pace, year-round.
NEWS
December 1, 1998
An excerpt of a New York Times editorial that was published Saturday:ONE of the most damaging consequences of the world's economic troubles is that parents are pulling their children out of school. Girls are the first casualty. In most poor and even middle-income countries, many girls stay home while their brothers go to primary school. Countries are now recognizing the harm caused by this educational gender gap, however, and some are trying new ideas to get girls into school and keep them there.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 23, 1996
POTGIETERSRUS, South Africa -- White parents threatened to start a new, whites-only school as 16 black children, in prim new uniforms, marched nervously past riot police and a fence topped with razor wire yesterday to desegregate a public primary school.The Potgietersrus Primary School was nearly empty. Most of its 700 or so white students stayed home. Several parents angrily announced they were protesting the court-ordered integration of the school, while others said they feared bloodshed after weeks of rising tension and threats in this right-wing stronghold.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 17, 1996
PRETORIA, South Africa -- In an echo of America's civil-rights struggle, a Supreme Court judge has ordered an all-white public school in a rural community to admit black children whom it had tried to prevent from enrolling.Judge Theo Spoelstra ruled yesterday that white authorities at Potgietersrus Primary School, which has 764 white pupils in an Afrikaner-dominated town 150 miles north of Pretoria, had violated the country's interim constitution by barring three black students from attending, "on racial grounds."
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | September 10, 1992
TOKYO -- For tens of thousands of young Japanese, September is the time to get fitted for the $400 dark-blue interview suit and think about that all-important application -- to elementary school.Dress-for-success 5-year-olds have not always been part of Japanese life.But this summer, as the application season approached, they became so ubiquitous that some newspapers printed shopping guides. The guides showed cartoon figures outfitted in the attire sure to get one's child into the private primary schools of choice.
NEWS
May 5, 1993
Several weeks ago, the Baltimore Teachers Union sent a "Dear Colleague" letter to its members announcing that it has started a "Take Back Our Schools" campaign designed to persuade Superintendent Walter Amprey and the school board to end all "experimental programs.""What's really wrong here?" the letter asked. "The truth is that the experimental programs haven't made one iota of difference in the classroom. . . . It's time to quit making guinea pigs out of our students, teachers and school employees."
NEWS
By From staff reports | March 27, 2003
In Baltimore City Board delays vote on loan to aid Santoni's expansion The Board of Estimates delayed yesterday its vote on a $300,000 loan to help Santoni's Super Market expand its Highlandtown store. The board agreed to defer the matter until next week because two of its members serve on the Baltimore Public Markets Corp.'s board of directors with Robert Santoni Sr., chief executive officer of Santoni's Super Market. The company, founded 73 years ago by Santoni's father, is embarking on a $2.4 million expansion of its grocery at East Lombard and South Eaton streets.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | June 7, 2009
Howard County's long struggle to eliminate school crowding seemed won over the past two years when no elementary or middle schools were projected beyond capacity, but this year six primary schools are on the annual list of future trouble spots. Unlike past years, crowded classrooms are predicted in older neighborhoods instead of in newer, more rural areas where multimillion-dollar schools were built early in the decade. In addition, school officials say newer apartment and condominium projects along U.S. 1, once expected to produce few school-age children, are outstripping predictions - something that could have implications for redevelopment of the town center in Columbia with 5,500 homes and apartments.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,[Special to The Sun] | April 1, 2007
Geography isn't all that separates the students at Fort Smallwood Elementary School from their peers in the tiny, impoverished village of Wamunyu, Kenya. The 24 students at Nyaani Primary School - at least 15 of whom were orphaned by the AIDS epidemic sweeping Africa - can't study after dark because they have no electricity. Their school has no plumbing, so adults had to tote water there, until 2005. That was the year when, because of a partnership between the schools, Nyaani Primary was able to buy a water tank.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2005
Most of Carroll County's 29,004 students will be cool in their air-conditioned classrooms tomorrow, even if typical August temperatures prevail at the start of the 2005-2006 school year. Enrollment has increased by 230 since last year and the county has hired another 212 teachers, bringing the number of employees to 3,383. And nearly all of them will have the comforts of climate control. All but one of the county's 44 school buildings, including its newest and first primary, Parr's Ridge Elementary in Mount Airy, are air-conditioned.
NEWS
By From staff reports | March 27, 2003
In Baltimore City Board delays vote on loan to aid Santoni's expansion The Board of Estimates delayed yesterday its vote on a $300,000 loan to help Santoni's Super Market expand its Highlandtown store. The board agreed to defer the matter until next week because two of its members serve on the Baltimore Public Markets Corp.'s board of directors with Robert Santoni Sr., chief executive officer of Santoni's Super Market. The company, founded 73 years ago by Santoni's father, is embarking on a $2.4 million expansion of its grocery at East Lombard and South Eaton streets.
NEWS
By GADY A. EPSTEIN and GADY A. EPSTEIN,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 2, 2002
BEIJING -- In a sixth-grade class at Liangxiang No. 3 Primary School, 51 pupils were analyzing a painting by Vincent van Gogh yesterday when the buzzer sounded to end the period. Time for everyone to join in the ritual rubbing of the eyes, a daily exercise for young students across China. In another classroom, 56 fourth-graders were enjoying reading time, but it was not exactly silent reading. Most read aloud at full volume, blissfully awash in the deafening sound of their own voices and waiting for the start of ceremonies marking the formal opening of school.
NEWS
By Donna W. Payne and Donna W. Payne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 20, 2002
Just before the holidays at the close of last year, the pre-kindergarten through first-graders at Glenelg Country School made a short trip. They walked from their school building to another nearby - but it was a journey of high excitement and expectation. On that day, the children at the private school in Glenelg had their first look inside their new building. The children and staff moved into the state-of-the-art facility in early January, but its official dedication took place March 13 Headmaster Ryland O. Chapman III recalled that first visit.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2012
The Harford County sheriff's office plans to have additional security Wednesday at five schools after a bomb threat was made. According to Capt. Keith Warner of the sheriff's office, the primary school mentioned in a threatening note was C. Milton Wright High School in Bel Air, which also had an unfounded bomb threat last week. Parents were notified Tuesday night that the school had been threatened again, according to schools spokeswoman Teri D. Kranefeld. Public high schools Aberdeen, Edgewood and Patterson Mill and the private John Carroll School were also mentioned in the note found at C. Milton Wright, Warner said.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,[Special to The Sun] | April 1, 2007
Geography isn't all that separates the students at Fort Smallwood Elementary School from their peers in the tiny, impoverished village of Wamunyu, Kenya. The 24 students at Nyaani Primary School - at least 15 of whom were orphaned by the AIDS epidemic sweeping Africa - can't study after dark because they have no electricity. Their school has no plumbing, so adults had to tote water there, until 2005. That was the year when, because of a partnership between the schools, Nyaani Primary was able to buy a water tank.
NEWS
By Alina Tugend and Alina Tugend,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 9, 2001
NEW YORK - Teachers at Public School 217, a large, diverse elementary school in the Ditmas Park section of Brooklyn, were searching for ways to explain to their students the attack on the World Trade Center. So they turned to a simple lesson that is part of their continuing conflict resolution program. The story tells about a drop of honey falling from a rooftop. First a cat and dog fight over the drop. Then the neighbors get involved. The king keeps saying it's not his problem. Finally it's all-out war. The king realizes he should have dealt with the problem when it was just a drop of honey.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2001
The children in Barbara Morant's first-grade class at Furley Elementary are deep in their daily three-hour literacy block. Emmanuel Lawson, 6, is reading entries from "The Children's Atlas of People and Places," in which his favorite is the Great Wall of China. Others are working on "Big Idea" projects: creating cartoons about Hermit the Crab or writing poems about their homes. The focus on literacy at the Northeast Baltimore school is a key element of a reform model education officials began experimenting with three years ago. Called Achievement First, it emphasizes in-classroom teacher training and support for principals.
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