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Primary Colors

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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 26, 1998
HOLLYWOOD -- The film "Primary Colors" seemed destined for success.Set to open March 20, the comedy-drama, based on the best seller by the political columnist Joe Klein, casts John Travolta as a roguish and progressive southern governor with a roving eye for women, Emma Thompson as his powerful and ambitious wife, Billy Bob Thornton as a James Carville-like associate and Kathy Bates as a longtime aide who knows where all the bodies are buried. It was directed and produced by Mike Nichols and adapted by his former comedy partner, Elaine May.The early signs on the film were strong.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 18, 2007
In the art of Africa, the mask is a versatile, multipurpose facade. It may signify identity and the ancestors, politics and medicine or the invisible world of the spirits. And in whatever form a mask appears, color is integral to its meaning. Now color is the subject of the second installment of Meditations on African Art, a three-part series at the Baltimore Museum of Art that explores African art from the point of view of the people who created it. The modestly scaled show presents about 30 traditional African masks from the museum's collection arranged in four groups: red, white, black and the tricolor that incorporates all three hues.
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NEWS
By SUSAN BAER and SUSAN BAER,SUN STAFF | February 4, 1996
"Primary Colors," by Anonymous. Random House. 366 pages. $24The guessing game surrounding the author of this novel of politics has already created a "Primary Colors" buzz inside the Washington beltway. But the "Deep Throat"-like mystery is purely a bonus when it comes to the allure of this book. It needs no such gimmick.Hip, energetic, funny and eye-opening, this thinly-veiled and somewhat kaleidoscopic account of Bill Clinton's 1992 presidential campaign - in this case we have Jack Stanton, the charismatic governor of a small southern state, and his high-powered lawyer wife Susan (who, yes, wears a hairband)
FEATURES
By Tran Ha and Tran Ha,Chicago Tribune | November 4, 2006
HIGH POINT, N.C. --The star power may have been lacking at the recent fall High Point Market (formerly the International Home Furnishings Market), with Martha Stewart conspicuously absent for the launch of her new furniture collection with Bernhardt. But there definitely wasn't a shortage of buzz-worthy introductions. Here are a few new furniture lines and pieces that caught our eye for their design, practicality and affordability. In most cases, the pieces featured will be available in retail stores in about six months.
NEWS
By Jack Germond and Jules Witcover | March 30, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The release of the movie version of "Primary Colors," the roman a clef based on President Clinton's campaign for the presidency in 1992, has come at a most propitious time for its maker, Mike Nichols, if not for the president.The not-even-thinly-veiled character of Mr. Clinton is played with mirrorlike similarity to the real thing by John Travolta, as a folksy smoothie with his eye not only on the prize of the presidency but also on sexual targets that come his way.Only the names are changed, as they say, but viewers familiar with the 1992 cast of campaign characters will have little trouble identifying the actors with the politicians and aides they portray, including Hillary Rodham Clinton.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | February 25, 1996
Maybe anybody in America who has not spoken out by now on "Primary Colors" by Anonymous (Random House. 366 pages. $24) should shut up. It has been reviewed virtually everywhere that reviews are published, including these pages. It has engaged columnists whose concerns range from the frothiest gossip to the profoundest questions of national destiny. It's the top best seller in America, fiction or nonfiction.Having finished a thorough, thoughtful reading, I am dismayed.Not by reviewers' enthusiasms: By and large they have judged it a fascinating, fast-paced, even compelling, political page-turner that gets great additional power from the fact that it appears to be a virtually fact-accurate rendition of the Clinton primary election campaign of four years ago. Fair enough.
NEWS
By DAVID KUSNET and DAVID KUSNET,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 1996
In Washington's political and journalistic circles, the talk is all about "Primary Colors," a thinly disguised account of Bill Clinton's long march to the Democratic presidential nomination.Sure, you've heard the media buzz: This book is such a dead-on portrait of the Clintons that it could only have been written by an insider.Washington's conventional wisdom is wrong.Except for flashes of insight about New York politics and the gritty realities of urban schools and union halls, which suggest that it was written by a street-smart, iconoclastic New Yorker, there's little that couldn't have been culled from a data base of the mainstream media and a pile of old supermarket tabloids.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1998
Primary Colors" may well be one of the best movies ever made about presidential politics, but in 1998, that is not enough.In a nation jaded by politicians and "educated" by wall-to-wall news analysis, a depiction of the manipulations and rationalizations in big-time campaigns fails to surprise or even dishearten anymore. The conclusions "Primary Colors" draws exactly mirror the calculations millions of Americans long ago made about Bill Clinton: Yes, he's flawed -- terribly, disappointingly, depressingly -- but he's also a pretty good president."
NEWS
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,SUN STAFF | July 18, 1996
Declaring "Clearly, I am 'Anonymous' no longer," reporter Joe Klein admitted yesterday that he is the author of the political best seller "Primary Colors."Klein is a political writer for Newsweek and a consultant to CBS news.He and Random House publisher Harold Evans made the revelation at a news conference in the company's New York headquarters, confirming the identification first singled out in The Sun on Feb. 11.Evans introduced the author, who strode boldly out of anonymity -- all smiles and ebullience -- to declare to the political and publishing worlds, and to live television cameras: "My name is Joe Klein and I wrote 'Primary Colors.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM and MICHAEL PAKENHAM,SUN STAFF | February 16, 1996
The anonymity of Anonymous suffered a major -- possibly mortal -- new blow yesterday with revelation of a scholarly computer analysis that indicated the author of "Primary Colors" is Newsweek writer Joe Klein. Mr. K article written for The Sun by David Kusnet and published last Sunday.This latest affirmation will be published in the issue of New York Magazine that goes on sale Monday. The identification of Mr. Klein was developed by Donald Foster, the Vassar College professor of English who a few weeks ago set the authoritative Modern Language Association on its ear by identifying a previously obscure 578-line elegy as the work of William Shakespeare.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2006
FWFR.COM What's the point? -- Four Word Film Review doesn't quite live up to its name - as its FAQ section notes, the site has evolved since the URL was chosen. But if you find haiku too loquacious, this site offers film descriptions and reviews no more than four words. The results are sometimes lame ("Oaf of office" for Primary Colors) and sometimes amusing ("Inigo introduces himself repeatedly" for Princess Bride and "Leto: Farewell to Arm" for Requiem for a Dream). What to look for --If you sign up for membership, you can post your own reviews and also rank others' reviews to help ensure the actually funny ones get their due.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | March 25, 2002
I'VE BEEN trying to work myself into a state of high dudgeon over the decision by the Jewish Museum in New York to host a display of controversial Holocaust art. So far, I haven't had much luck. I look at the controversy over the exhibits -- a death camp made of Legos, a photograph of a man holding up a Diet Coke can amid a group of emaciated Jews -- and what emerges is not so much anger as, well, I was going to say ambivalence, but that's not quite the right word. It's more a sense of recognition, a sense that we've been to this crossroads of art and indignation before, and it's no accident we keep coming back.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | February 25, 2001
"Simplicity" is the new mantra in the decor domain. It means plain, as in spare: white sheets, unadorned dinnerware, curtain panels instead of drapes, sheer fabrics, neutrals dotted with a few jewel or earth colors. It means matelasse coverlets instead of floral bedspreads, and orchids instead of ficus trees as houseplants. Carrie Tuhy, managing editor of the magazine Real Simple, considers the trend a confluence of three things: one, people like to simplify because it puts order in their lives; two, women live far more affluent and choice-abundant lives than in the past; and three, it's a form of guilt-free consumption, saying, "I know who I am and I buy this because it will improve my life."
FEATURES
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2001
He's gone. But he's not. Who felt your pain, didn't inhale, parsed words, knew the secret meaning of what "is" is and did not have sexual relations with that woman? Who charged everyday objects with heightened meaning - a cigar, a blue dress, a beret, a cheeseburger? You haven't forgotten, and you won't. Even today, as a new man commands the White House, you will no sooner forget Bill Clinton than you will forget the Beatles, the Babe or Marilyn. Because for eight glorious years Bill Clinton's presidency reigned over American pop culture with greater aplomb and influence than Jerry Springer, the New York Yankees, hip-hop, Forrest Gump and the ghost of Elvis Presley.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | April 12, 1998
Attending a film festival may smack of a busman's holiday for a film critic, but that's just how I spent my spring vacation. For 10 days recently, I gorged myself on films, music, Tex-Mex and barbecue at the South by Southwest film and music festival in Austin, Texas.The fortnight was exhausting, fattening and thoroughly exhilarating. There's nothing like marathon movies -- in the company of fellow enthusiasts -- to remind a critic that film can still be the most absorbing, electric and transforming of artistic mediums.
NEWS
By Jack Germond and Jules Witcover | March 30, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The release of the movie version of "Primary Colors," the roman a clef based on President Clinton's campaign for the presidency in 1992, has come at a most propitious time for its maker, Mike Nichols, if not for the president.The not-even-thinly-veiled character of Mr. Clinton is played with mirrorlike similarity to the real thing by John Travolta, as a folksy smoothie with his eye not only on the prize of the presidency but also on sexual targets that come his way.Only the names are changed, as they say, but viewers familiar with the 1992 cast of campaign characters will have little trouble identifying the actors with the politicians and aides they portray, including Hillary Rodham Clinton.
FEATURES
By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 10, 1996
Did you know Hillary Clinton seduced George Stephanopolous during the 1992 presidential campaign? I didn't either till I read "Primary Colors," by Anonymous. But it's right there in the book. That and much much more about the Clintons and many other figures from the campaign.Anonymous might issue a disclaimer to the effect that it is wrong for a reader to confuse what happens in a novel -- a work of fiction, of the imagination -- with what happened in real life. But Anonymous would be wrong.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 18, 2007
In the art of Africa, the mask is a versatile, multipurpose facade. It may signify identity and the ancestors, politics and medicine or the invisible world of the spirits. And in whatever form a mask appears, color is integral to its meaning. Now color is the subject of the second installment of Meditations on African Art, a three-part series at the Baltimore Museum of Art that explores African art from the point of view of the people who created it. The modestly scaled show presents about 30 traditional African masks from the museum's collection arranged in four groups: red, white, black and the tricolor that incorporates all three hues.
FEATURES
By David Kusnet and David Kusnet,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 20, 1998
David Kusnet was President Clinton's chief speech writer during the general election campaign in 1992 and the first two years of the administration. In February 1996, he wrote an article for The ,, Sun contending that "Anonymous," the author of "Primary Colors," was Joe Klein. Currently, Kusnet is a visiting fellow at the Economic Policy Institute in Washington.The first time I met Bill Clinton was in a crowded hotel room in Los Angeles, a few hours before he clinched the Democratic presidential nomination in 1992.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1998
Primary Colors" may well be one of the best movies ever made about presidential politics, but in 1998, that is not enough.In a nation jaded by politicians and "educated" by wall-to-wall news analysis, a depiction of the manipulations and rationalizations in big-time campaigns fails to surprise or even dishearten anymore. The conclusions "Primary Colors" draws exactly mirror the calculations millions of Americans long ago made about Bill Clinton: Yes, he's flawed -- terribly, disappointingly, depressingly -- but he's also a pretty good president."
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