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NEWS
December 16, 2011
Allow me to reduce your 110 column inches on Mark Midei to the crucial one: "Reviewers saw 30 percent narrowings when Dr. Midei saw 90 percent. " ("Mark Midei fights for medical license, exoneration," Dec. 10.) The rest is rhetoric. A key role of primary care physicians is to prevent unnecessary procedures by specialists. This is impossible if the patient is sucked through an ER evaluation and stenting procedure like a goose through a jet engine, without ever calling the patient's physician.
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NEWS
November 29, 2013
I read Anne P. Hahn and Michael Reisch's commentary on hospital reform with sad amusement ( "Hospitals too must reform under Obamacare," Nov. 11). Their arguments are all backward. Hospitals actually need to step back from the their invasion into the community, not become more involved in it. As an internal medicine physician in solo practice for 25 years in Baltimore City, I can relate first-hand to the destructive effect hospital involvement has had on the community. Not that long ago, there was a clear separation between outpatient and inpatient care, and each was independent of the other.
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BUSINESS
by Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Su | September 20, 2010
State health officials have approved a plan by CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield to reward primary physicians for improving health outcomes for patients. The insurance company is the first in the state to be approved by the Maryland Health Care Commission for the "single payer" medical home initiative. The program is designed to encourage doctors who participate to focus on treating the sickest patients. The insurance company hopes that if people visit primary care physicians, illness would be caught and treated early.
HEALTH
January 22, 2013
The state is attempting to make it easier for physicians to connect child and adolescent patients to mental health services and better diagnose those that have potential psychiatric symptoms. Under a new initiative, primary care physicians in Maryland will have access to mental health specialists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health through a phone consultation line. Training on how to identify mental health problems in children will also be offered under the initiative and the state will create a better pipeline between doctors and psychologists and psychiatrists.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2011
State officials on Tuesday announced a plan to increase the number of primary care health professionals by as much as 25 percent in the next decade through a wide range of goals that include increased educational opportunities, financial incentives and tort reform. Maryland and the rest of the country are dealing with a shortage of primary care physicians and fear the problem will worsen when health care reform adds millions more people to the insurance rolls. Nearly 360,000 new people will have access to insurance in Maryland by 2020.
NEWS
April 7, 2011
Janet Trautwein seems to feel jobs are being lost because medical insurers are suffering under new healthcare legislation and bemoans the mere 2.2% profit ( "Health care reform takes toll on jobs" April 7). Perhaps she should tell us what that absolute amount in dollars is. It might astound us. It should be noted that the bloated 20 million dollar salaries and bonus for the CEOs is taken off the books before profit is determined as well as the money in reserved accounts for deferred possible future claims.
NEWS
March 4, 1997
Hospice of the Chesapeake gets $10,000 donationHospice of the Chesapeake recently received a $10,000 donation from the Severn Town Club.The hospice will use the money to care for terminally ill patients and to provide counseling and support to bereaved residents of Anne Arundel County. Information: 987-2003.Names in the newsMaryland Primary Care Physicians of Annapolisnapolis has announced that Dr. David Anderson of Davidsonville has joined the practice. Anderson has also worked as a ship physician for Regency Cruise Line and on Emergency Room Physician at St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center in Hartford, Conn.
EXPLORE
April 5, 2012
Carroll County was named as the fifth healthiest place to live in Maryland by a national research group analysis. The report, released April 3, comes from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute. The annual study ranks counties in each state by health factors and socio-economic factors such as employment rates, poverty and crime. Carroll ranked particularly high - No. 3 in the state - in socio-economic factors, which included factors such as violent crime, percentage of single-parent children and high school graduation rates.
NEWS
October 12, 2012
Reading your article on health care insurance last month I was struck by how Maryland is attempting to make health care services available to all state residents at an affordable price ("Maryland picks model for essential health insurance benefits," Sept. 27). I was gratified to see that the state government recognizes what a critical issue pain management has become. As workers in a hospital emergency room in a small town in Maryland we see many individuals who experience chronic pain and come to the ER for treatment.
NEWS
January 12, 2013
The lack of mental health resources in the United States has contributed to a significant increase in visits to the emergency department ("How to care for mentally ill people?" Jan. 8). Psychiatric emergencies grew by 131 percent between 2000 and 2007, according to a recent study. Psychiatric patients often "board" in the hallways of emergency department for several days, waiting for inpatient psychiatric services. This contributes to overcrowding which harms everyone. Emergency physicians are dedicated to providing a medical home for any patient who can't access medical care including people with health insurance who are unable to get timely appointments with their primary care physicians.
NEWS
January 12, 2013
The lack of mental health resources in the United States has contributed to a significant increase in visits to the emergency department ("How to care for mentally ill people?" Jan. 8). Psychiatric emergencies grew by 131 percent between 2000 and 2007, according to a recent study. Psychiatric patients often "board" in the hallways of emergency department for several days, waiting for inpatient psychiatric services. This contributes to overcrowding which harms everyone. Emergency physicians are dedicated to providing a medical home for any patient who can't access medical care including people with health insurance who are unable to get timely appointments with their primary care physicians.
NEWS
October 12, 2012
Reading your article on health care insurance last month I was struck by how Maryland is attempting to make health care services available to all state residents at an affordable price ("Maryland picks model for essential health insurance benefits," Sept. 27). I was gratified to see that the state government recognizes what a critical issue pain management has become. As workers in a hospital emergency room in a small town in Maryland we see many individuals who experience chronic pain and come to the ER for treatment.
EXPLORE
April 5, 2012
Carroll County was named as the fifth healthiest place to live in Maryland by a national research group analysis. The report, released April 3, comes from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute. The annual study ranks counties in each state by health factors and socio-economic factors such as employment rates, poverty and crime. Carroll ranked particularly high - No. 3 in the state - in socio-economic factors, which included factors such as violent crime, percentage of single-parent children and high school graduation rates.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | February 6, 2012
The University of Maryland School of Medicine will use a five-year $877,000 grantĀ  on a program to increase the number of students who enter primary care fields. The school said Monday it will create a primary care track that will allow students to work one-on-one with faculty from family medicine, pediatrics, internal medicineĀ and other primary care specialties. The new program is being developed as health care reform is expected to put further pressure on primary care doctors.
NEWS
December 16, 2011
Allow me to reduce your 110 column inches on Mark Midei to the crucial one: "Reviewers saw 30 percent narrowings when Dr. Midei saw 90 percent. " ("Mark Midei fights for medical license, exoneration," Dec. 10.) The rest is rhetoric. A key role of primary care physicians is to prevent unnecessary procedures by specialists. This is impossible if the patient is sucked through an ER evaluation and stenting procedure like a goose through a jet engine, without ever calling the patient's physician.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2011
State officials on Tuesday announced a plan to increase the number of primary care health professionals by as much as 25 percent in the next decade through a wide range of goals that include increased educational opportunities, financial incentives and tort reform. Maryland and the rest of the country are dealing with a shortage of primary care physicians and fear the problem will worsen when health care reform adds millions more people to the insurance rolls. Nearly 360,000 new people will have access to insurance in Maryland by 2020.
NEWS
November 29, 2013
I read Anne P. Hahn and Michael Reisch's commentary on hospital reform with sad amusement ( "Hospitals too must reform under Obamacare," Nov. 11). Their arguments are all backward. Hospitals actually need to step back from the their invasion into the community, not become more involved in it. As an internal medicine physician in solo practice for 25 years in Baltimore City, I can relate first-hand to the destructive effect hospital involvement has had on the community. Not that long ago, there was a clear separation between outpatient and inpatient care, and each was independent of the other.
NEWS
By Anthony G. Brown | June 24, 2011
Over the last 40 years, Maryland and the entire country have seen groundbreaking advances in the fields of medicine and health care. We have developed life-sustaining treatments for previously fatal diseases, including many types of cancer, HIV, and heart disease. Life expectancy has climbed, and infant mortality has fallen. But these successes are not enough. They are not enough when so many of our accomplishments in health are shadowed by unacceptable disparities. It is not enough that we have new tools for early diabetes detection and kidney care when in Maryland about twice as many blacks suffer from diabetes compared to whites.
NEWS
April 7, 2011
Janet Trautwein seems to feel jobs are being lost because medical insurers are suffering under new healthcare legislation and bemoans the mere 2.2% profit ( "Health care reform takes toll on jobs" April 7). Perhaps she should tell us what that absolute amount in dollars is. It might astound us. It should be noted that the bloated 20 million dollar salaries and bonus for the CEOs is taken off the books before profit is determined as well as the money in reserved accounts for deferred possible future claims.
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