Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPrimary Care
IN THE NEWS

Primary Care

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1997
Children's Hospital said yesterday it will make its first venture into primary care, adding three doctors who will include "complementary" techniques such as acupuncture.Robert A. Chrzan, president and chief executive officer, said, "We believe primary medicine becomes the basis for a number of things you need to do," including a future focus on "wellness." Strong practices in family and internal medicine, he said, can lead to more specialist physicians seeking privileges at the hospital and to more referrals of patients, for both inpatient and outpatient care.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
September 12, 2014
Federal health officials have awarded $3.5 million in Affordable Care Act funds to 14 community health centers in Maryland. The money will go to hire 60 new workers, expand hours and increase access to primary care. The money will also go to expand services to include dental care, mental health services, prescription drug coverage and vision services. The money is expected to provide care to more than 20,000 new patients around the state. See the list of centers receiving grants here . Around the nation, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded $295 million to 1,195 centers with ore than 9,000 sites.
Advertisement
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2010
Gov. Martin O'Malley signed legislation Tuesday to allow Maryland's nurse practitioners to cut bureaucratic delays and start practicing more quickly, a move providers hope will help alleviate the state's primary-care doctor shortage. The law streamlines the bulky credentialing process required for nurse practitioners to treat patients in Maryland. A process that now requires approvals by separate boards of doctors and nurses –- and can take up to six months — will be shortened to about a month, cutting the standard 19-page working agreement between nurses and doctors to a single page.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
The medical system that provides care to Maryland's veterans signed a one-year contract with Evergreen Health Care in Baltimore to offer primary health services to new patients, federal and co-op officials said Thursday. The $485,000 contract aims to cut down on wait times that had become some of the worst in the nation. A June audit found Central Maryland's veterans were waiting an average of 80 days to see a primary-care doctor for an initial visit, the fourth longest wait in the nation.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | September 4, 2009
With heated debates about reforming health care swirling across the country, professors from the University of Maryland's graduate schools told more than 200 students about how proposed changes might affect their future careers in medicine, dentistry, nursing, law, pharmacy and social work at a panel discussion Thursday night in downtown Baltimore. All the professors agreed that the U.S. health care system needs to be reformed. "We do need to control spiraling costs, but we don't want to do that at the cost of stifling innovation," said Dr. Mandeep R. Mehra, professor and head of cardiology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
NEWS
June 23, 2010
Congressman John Sarbanes had an excellent letter on the shortage of primary care physicians in Maryland (Readers respond, June 18 Baltimore Sun). His proposal for a public service loan forgiveness option is a step in the right direction to encourage physicians to enter primary health care practice. However student loan burden is a vast understatement of the true costs of becoming a primary care physician. In addition to medical school tuition, there is forgone income for four years of medical school, reduced income for three years of residency training and accrued interest on all of the above amounts.
NEWS
September 27, 2010
I read your story on Andy Harris and the support he is engendering from the anesthesiology community ("Doctors inject thousands into Harris campaign," Sept. 27). You seemed to portray the situation as a struggle between doctors, who support Andy Harris, and nurse anesthetists, who support their own right to be independent practitioners. As a primary care physician, I can tell you that I, and many of my colleagues, support neither camp. Both anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists earn too much as it is. Politicians give a lot of lip service to primary care, yet in our present environment very few medical students are entering primary care fields due to low earnings.
NEWS
July 16, 2010
I thank Dion Rudnicki of IBM for praising primary care ("A medical 'home' for every patient; Maryland is moving in the direction of more personalized, better-coordinated care," Commentary, July 13) It is the sine qua non of a solvent system. I don't see how IBM will succeed at recruiting primary care providers to Maryland when Johns Hopkins is losing them. My sister-in-law left Hopkins a year ago for 50 per cent better pay in Pennsylvania. Doctors pay represents only 6 per cent of health care cost, and most of that goes to specialists.
NEWS
June 17, 2010
Before serving in Congress, I worked closely with physicians and other health providers throughout the state of Maryland. Unfortunately, the shortage of health professionals, particularly primary care physicians, is a problem that has been building for many years. A recent article in The Sun, "Medical schools don't produce enough primary care doctors, study says" (June 16), drew attention to this problem and accurately pinpointed some of the reasons for it. Medical school debt can be a severe burden for young physicians.
NEWS
January 16, 2014
Who is ready to improve heath care at lower costs? Independent doctors and their patients are. My wife and I organized a group of independent doctors who are in CareFirst Blue Cross Blue Shield's Patient-Centered Medical Home program. Twenty-one years ago, I irritated old docs with my ability to use laptops and then electronic medical records. I took sixth grade typing class, had they? Why did they use dictation? I have been the new kid on the block, so I can connect with any patient.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
The developer says his planned center for heroin addicts in a North Baltimore neighborhood would be revolutionary: a primary care facility that would treat all aspects of addict's lives, not just dole out methadone. But Harwood residents see it as more of the same for a community they say is already filled with people bused in for addiction services. More addicts, they say, lead to more public urination, drug use and crime. "When the lifeboat is full, the next person being worthy doesn't make it any less likely to sink," said Joe McNeely, president of a neighborhood coalition opposed to the center.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | June 26, 2014
MedStar Health plans to open its new hybrid health care facility off Key Highway in the Federal Hill-Locust Point area July 7 that will offer both urgent care and doctor appointments.   The hospital chain already has a similar facility in Mitchellville and plans and third in Bel Air. Officials believe such "one-stop shops" will be convenient for patients and a good business model for them. More than 25,000 people are expected to use the facility in the first year, either for urgent care or for medical services in the areas of primary care, orthopedics and sports medicine, cardiology or obstetrics-gynecology.
NEWS
January 16, 2014
Who is ready to improve heath care at lower costs? Independent doctors and their patients are. My wife and I organized a group of independent doctors who are in CareFirst Blue Cross Blue Shield's Patient-Centered Medical Home program. Twenty-one years ago, I irritated old docs with my ability to use laptops and then electronic medical records. I took sixth grade typing class, had they? Why did they use dictation? I have been the new kid on the block, so I can connect with any patient.
NEWS
January 5, 2014
Last week, Gov. Martin O'Malley's administration announced that it had exceeded its goal for enrolling low-income Marylanders in the Medicaid program as part of the health insurance expansion under the Affordable Care Act. In addition to improving the health and well being of 111,000 people who have gotten coverage under the Medicaid expansion, state officials hope the expanded coverage will ultimately help reduce health care costs as the previously uninsured...
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | December 11, 2013
A new Patient First medical center opened Wednesday on York Road in Towson, ending a protracted planning and construction process and providing urgent and primary care in northern Towson. The clinic, which will feature urgent care, primary care, digital x-rays, and lab work, will be open 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. every day of the year. "The goal of Patient First is to provide convenient, cost-effective medical care on a walk-in basis," R.P. Sowers, founder and CEO of Patient First, said in a statement.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
When it first opened its doors in 1978, Chase Brexton was a small operation of volunteers started to address the new AIDS epidemic and its effect on gay men, the population most hit at the time by the disease. The organization has since grown into one that offers a broad range of medical care. It now has a strong primary care component, a pharmacy, and mental health and dental services. Its reach spans far beyond AIDS patients - which now make up 16 percent of it clientele - and Baltimore's gay population.
EXPLORE
June 1, 2011
  In response to the article, "ER visits might hit high hark," which ran the week of May 26, I agree wholeheartedly that the emergency room is not the ideal place to be treated for minor injuries or illnesses, nor for care that should be provided at lower-cost facilities, including urgent-care centers and primary-care practices. However, while the article encouraged individuals to seek medical attention for minor illness and injury from urgent-care centers, it totally overlooked the role that primary-care practices play in limiting unnecessary trips to the ER through comprehensive and cost-effective preventive and acute care.
NEWS
September 23, 2010
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield is offering primary care doctors a 12 percent increase in reimbursement for preventive care ("CareFirst's promising idea for primary care," Sept. 23). Primary care doctors are expected to draw up care plans, have in depth encounters with their patients and follow their patients more frequently to be eligible, and if they show good outcomes with less hospitalizations and surgeries for the same patients, they will be rewarded up to 80 percent of the savings in cost that CareFirst anticipates it will reap from this program.
NEWS
May 30, 2013
As president of the Maryland chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics and its over 900 member physicians statewide, I am writing to express support for Dr. Jeffrey Cain's concerns surrounding pharmacy based clinics in your article, "The drugstore clinics debate" and their impact on patient centered medical homes. When children are seen in pharmacy based clinics, they are intrinsically not receiving the level of care provided by the child's primary care doctor. The medical home is best described as a model or philosophy of primary care that is patient-centered, comprehensive, team-based, coordinated, accessible and focused on quality and safety.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2013
Vernissia Tam gulped down half a glass of champagne at noon Friday and prepared to scream. She was about to find out what kind of doctor she would become, and where she would train. "No peeking," a Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine official told the Class of 2013. "The diplomas aren't printed yet. " After a countdown from 10 that took all of three seconds, Tam and her classmates broke the seals on letters revealing their fates, jumping into one another's arms for an embrace and congratulations.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.