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NEWS
By Rob Richie and Steven Hill | March 2, 2004
MARYLAND DEMOCRATS heading to the polls today can take some satisfaction that they still have a choice among candidates in the race for the presidential nomination. But backers of candidates who have dropped out will have to settle for a smaller, less diverse field because of choices made in earlier primaries and caucuses. Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts has a clear edge, having so far won 18 of the 20 contests electing delegates. But Sen. John Edwards of North Carolina is pushing him hard.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz has endorsed District 2 Councilwoman Vicki Almond in the November general election - after backing her Democratic primary opponent earlier this year. It's known in political circles that Almond and Kamenetz don't always agree, and that became clear when Kamenetz endorsed Almond's opponent, Jon Herbst, in the June primary. In a press release this week, Kamenetz announced support for Almond as well as others in the northwestern part of the county: Sen. Bobby Zirkin, Dels.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 13, 2011
Barely three weeks from now, on Jan. 3, Republicans will start the quest for their 2012 presidential nominee in Iowa's precinct caucuses. Already the winnowing process among the candidates has begun, with the "suspension" of Herman Cain's ill-fated campaign. The process will continue for the survivors after Iowa, unless one of them unexpectedly scores an early knockout, as the well-heeled Mitt Romney had first hoped. But with the pendulum seemingly swinging Newt Gingrich's way lately, Mr. Romney will now be relying on his better-financed and better-organized campaign to check the former House speaker's unexpected momentum.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
The medical system that provides care to Maryland's veterans signed a one-year contract with Evergreen Health Care in Baltimore to offer primary health services to new patients, federal and co-op officials said Thursday. The $485,000 contract aims to cut down on wait times that had become some of the worst in the nation. A June audit found Central Maryland's veterans were waiting an average of 80 days to see a primary-care doctor for an initial visit, the fourth longest wait in the nation.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2010
Both Del. Elizabeth Bobo and Howard County Councilwoman Mary Kay Sigaty decisively won their West Columbia Democratic primaries, despite their sharply divergent views on the much debated renewal plan for central Columbia. Virtually complete, if unofficial returns showed Bobo won the Democratic nomination for her seat with 82 percent of the vote, and Sigaty got 62.5 percent of the vote in her Council District 4 race. The results showed that many voters picked both popular incumbents, and did not vote on the Columbia issue.
NEWS
July 21, 1994
What had figured to be a humdrum election season in Howard County, dominated by a seemingly invincible Republican county executive, could become anything but. A host of candidates has entered various races, producing primaries for 13 of 19 seats and portending a general election with spunk.Democrat Sue-Ellen Hantman appears the front-runner to face off against Republican County Executive Charles I. Ecker. Ms. Hantman's prior experience as head of the local Democratic Central Committee is likely to work in her favor because primaries tend to draw party regulars.
NEWS
April 9, 2007
Nine months before the first votes are cast and at a time when almost no one outside the political industry is paying attention, a crowded field of presidential contenders is being thinned on the basis of the candidates' ability to raise money. In theory, that's a fair test of an appealing campaign message - and the good news for democracy is that the presumed front-runners in both parties no longer look like prohibitive favorites so far in advance of Election Day. But the extraordinary dollar chase has so dominated the campaigns so far that candidates have little time for anything else.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | April 22, 2008
If this is a marathon, surely we're approaching the last uphill. Long past any endorphin high, we're now into the oxygen-depleted, brain-benumbed, shin-splinting part of the race. But the finish line remains out of sight - in fact, it appears to be moving farther away rather than closer with every painful step. Welcome to the Democratic presidential primary, the race that apparently is never going to end but will just keep going, and going and going - who knows, past the general election in November, past inauguration day in January.
NEWS
May 6, 1992
Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton fashioned a handsome sweep over Jerry Brown in primaries in North Carolina, Indiana and the District of Columbia yesterday on his methodical march to the Democratic presidential nomination.President Bush, his grip on renomination secure, cruised past Patrick J. Buchanan in all three GOP primaries.Exit polls showed roughly a quarter of the voters in both states and both parties said they would support Texas billionaire Ross Perot if he ran as an independent in the fall.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | April 12, 2000
PRESIDENTIAL campaigns in gentler days used to be compared with sports events - for example, a horse race in which there were winter-book favorites and handicapping, leading to a winner and losers. Or baseball, with the primary elections cast as a sort of spring training, leading up to the World Series in November. More recently, with the advent of political hired guns whose motivation is to win at any cost, the comparison increasingly has been not with sports, but with warfare. A candidate's objective is to attack and destroy his opponent and his reputation, usually couched in the more polite term of defining him before he can define himself.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
Candidates for governor in Maryland's June primary spent a record of almost $25 million - paying roughly $35 for every voter who showed up at the polls. Campaign finance reports filed with the State Board of Elections this week show that the primary's cost exceeded the total spent during the primary and general election four years ago by more than $2 million. As Democrat Anthony G. Brown continues to raise money apace and Republican Larry Hogan has $2.4 million in public financing, they appear on track to shatter the record $33 million spent on the gubernatorial contest in 2006.
SPORTS
By Matt Zenitz and Baltimore Sun Media Group | August 19, 2014
COLLEGE PARK -- Two of Randy Edsall's primary concerns entering preseason practice remain two of the coach's top concerns as Maryland now gets ready to wrap up camp: Depth at cornerback and depth along the offensive line. “[Those are] probably the two positions I would like to have more depth,” Edsall said. At cornerback, the Terrapins have sophomore Will Likely, junior Alvin Hill and senior Jeremiah Johnson, a top three Edsall and defensive coordinator Brian Stewart have voiced confidence in. But the players behind those three lack experience.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2014
Towson running back Darius Victor had a front-row seat to the scintillating runs that Terrance West made last year during the team's march to the Football Championship Subdivision national championship game. And one of the things Victor, then a freshman, admired was West's patience. "Last year, I rushed to the hole sometimes," Victor recalled. "I made a couple good plays, but I rushed some things. Terrance had great patience. He would tell me, 'Little bro, did you see that?' Everything he did, he would tell me, and that's why I love him so much.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
George Harman won the Republican primary for Baltimore County executive last month by 20 votes, election officials said after a rare recount. Harman, an environmental consultant from Reisterstown, will face Democratic County Executive Kevin Kamenetz in the general election. "I'm going to focus on open, honest and ethical government," Harman said. GOP rival Tony Campbell requested the recount last week after trailing Harman by 18 votes in the June 24 primary election. Officials began counting about 28,000 ballots Tuesday morning and finished that evening.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
A Republican candidate for Baltimore County executive has asked to recount ballots after he lost the party's primary by a margin of only 18 votes. Tony Campbell, of Towson, made the request Thursday, according to county election director Katie Brown. Following the June 24 primary election, Campbell barely trailed candidate George Harman, of Reisterstown. "It is important for citizens in a democratic republic to know that their votes count," Campbell said in a statement. More than 20,000 votes were cast in the race, and because the margin was so slim, officials did not finish counting all ballots until Monday.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
The tight Republican primary for a seat on the Anne Arundel County Council representing Severna Park and Broadneck has been settled, with Michael Anthony Peroutka claiming a 38-vote victory on Wednesday. Second-place finisher Maureen Carr-York conceded the race to Peroutka early Wednesday morning. Once all absentee and provisional ballots were counted this week, Peroutka had 2,337 votes to 2,299 for Carr-York. Incumbent Councilman Dick Ladd was third with 1,903 votes, followed by Joseph M. Campbell with 485 votes and Jack Norman Wilson Sr. with 157 votes.
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,Sun Staff Writer | March 9, 1994
New Hampshire and Iowa beware. A group of American cities, possibly including Baltimore, are out to steal your presidential primary thunder.The U.S. Conference of Mayors, frustrated by the short shrift urban issues have received in recent presidential campaigns, has sanctioned a plan to move its concerns to the center of the debate.The current calendar of presidential primaries and caucuses "effectively disenfranchises millions of urban-dwelling Americans, making their views largely irrelevant to the presidential nominating process," the mayors said in a June 1992 resolution.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | March 12, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A noticeably relieved and relaxed George Bush publicly put the insurgent Republican challenge to his re-election behind him yesterday and returned to the business of being president.At a morning-after press conference following his eight Super Tuesday victories over conservative commentator Patrick J. Buchanan, Mr. Bush said he was confident the challenger had attracted mostly protest voters unhappy about the economy who will "come home to roost" in the November election even if a recovery is not under way.He stopped short of urging Mr. Buchanan to give up the quest that has yielded the challenger no victories in 15 states but has terrorized the Bush campaign with attacks that have not only given voice to Republican unhappiness but provided fodder for the Democratic challenge to come.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
Cory McCray spent his 18th birthday in a Baltimore jail cell. Antonio Hayes was raised by his grandmother when his mother's drug addiction got too bad. Brooke Lierman grew up in the affluent suburbs of Montgomery County, the daughter of a renowned political family. The three 30-somethings from disparate backgrounds are the new faces of Baltimore politics. Lierman, 35, was the top voter-getter in Southeast Baltimore's 46th District in last month's Democratic primary. Hayes, 36, took in more votes that any sitting delegate in West Baltimore's 40th District — ultimately ousting incumbent Shawn Z. Tarrant.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
A year ago, the Maryland State Board of Education upheld a Howard County school board request to oust fellow member Allen Dyer - and it didn't matter that the Ellicott City resident's term had long since expired. The board's decision culminated a protracted battle between Dyer and fellow board members and marked what many believe was the first time in state history an elected school board member was ordered to vacate his seat. This week Dyer took a step closer to staging a dramatic return.
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