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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 11, 1996
HELSINKI, Finland -- Yevgeni M. Primakov, the new Russian foreign minister, said yesterday that Russia continued to desire a close working relationship with the United States and had no intention of trying to resurrect the Soviet Union.Mr. Primakov, who spoke after two days of meetings here with Secretary of State Warren Christopher, also said Russia would zTC not put into effect any new oil deal with Iraq until the United Nations lifted sanctions against it.Mr. Primakov, 66, took over in January as foreign minister after Andrei V. Kozyrev, a pro-Western liberal, was fired.
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NEWS
By Ilan Berman | May 29, 2003
WASHINGTON - On the way to war with Iraq, a funny thing happened to the Bush administration - it lost Russia. Russian President Vladimir V. Putin, until the war considered a staunch White House ally, was suddenly seen in Europe standing shoulder to shoulder with French President Jacques Chirac and German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder in opposition to U.S. policy. Moscow's about-face was quite unexpected. Conventional wisdom in Washington had long predicted an eventual Russian alignment with the United States on the Iraq issue.
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NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 11, 1998
MOSCOW -- With one short, stilted message yesterday, President Boris N. Yeltsin nominated Yevgeny M. Primakov as prime minister and instantly changed all the political rules here.Unlikely partnerships began to form at the news that Yeltsin had abandoned his first choice, Viktor S. Chernomyrdin.The fiercest of political enemies stopped quarreling. Communists and liberal democrats competed to praise Primakov. Warnings of fascism and blood in the streets abruptly stopped, and talk turned to reconciliation and compromise.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 19, 1999
MOSCOW -- Sergei Dorenko, television news commentator, sighs as he considers the cross he bears: Every week, as 40 million viewers across Russia watch in disgust and satisfaction, he crucifies Moscow Mayor Yuri M. Luzhkov."
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 18, 1999
MOSCOW -- Former Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov united with Moscow Mayor Yuri Luzhkov yesterday in a broad-based coalition that many analysts say is positioned to dominate Russia's parliamentary elections in December and undercut President Boris N. Yeltsin's hopes of installing his chosen successor in next year's presidential elections.The union of Primakov and Luzhkov, two of the best-known political figures in Russia, could enable the new Fatherland-All Russia political movement to capture control of the now-Communist-dominated State Duma, the lower house of parliament, then vault toward the 2000 presidential elections, analysts said.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 6, 1999
MOSCOW -- Everywhere he looks, Russia's most powerful tycoon sees Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov coming after him.Boris Berezovsky comes under more pressure every day -- with investigators raiding his holdings, spectacular revelations in the press, and thinly veiled threats from Primakov himself.But that might be the only way to tackle a man who, among other attributes, has long enjoyed the confidence of President Boris N. Yeltsin and his family.The prime minister had presented a mild face to the nation for nearly five months, seemingly trying to do nothing wrong by doing practically nothing at all. But now he has latched onto a campaign against economic crime in general and against the one man in particular who more than any other embodies the power and arrogance of Russia's financial oligarchs.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 16, 1998
MOSCOW -- An outspoken economic reformer reportedly has left the Russian government, removing one of the last strong voices for free-market reform in the team being put together by Prime Minister Yevgeny Primakov.The future of the official, Boris Fyodorov, a former finance minister who returned to the government in the spring to spearhead an aggressive tax collection drive, has been closely watched here and abroad as a sign of whether the Primakov government will represent a range of economic viewpoints or will tilt heavily toward policies favored by the Communists.
NEWS
January 14, 1996
IN THE DRAMATIC final days of the collapsing Soviet Union, Andrei Kozyrev was being squired around Paris by U.S. diplomats. In euphoric television interviews the Russian foreign ministry official prematurely talked about how Washington and Moscow would be natural allies in the post-communist era. He even proposed his country might join the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.This was nothing but naivete. Whether allies or foes, big powers seldom have a unanimity of opinion. Just review the tortuous history of relations between the United States and France and their frequent squabbling about NATO.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 30, 1999
MOSCOW -- Flying into Yugoslavia today in hopes of finding a means to halt the NATO airstrikes, Russian Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov is trying to resuscitate Russian influence in the Balkans and just maybe pull off a diplomatic coup.Expectations here are low, but after Moscow's failure last week to prevent the NATO attack, Primakov has little to lose by trying."Everyone understands his mission is almost impossible," Vyacheslav Nikonov, head of the Polity Foundation, said yesterday.If a solution eludes Primakov today, Nikonov said, "it cannot be regarded as a failure of Russian diplomacy."
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 12, 1998
MOSCOW -- Calling on him to rise to the stature of a Russian Roosevelt and lead the nation away from economic collapse, the lower house of parliament enthusiastically approved Yevgeny M. Primakov as prime minister last night.The new prime minister's first appointments, however, were hardly reminiscent of the bold minds that fashioned Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal and recast American capitalism. Instead, they came from the Soviet past, reminding some Russians of the old deal that served them so badly.
NEWS
August 25, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the Los Angeles Times, which was published Sunday.THE DATE to watch in Russia is Dec. 18. That's when voters will choose the 450 members of the Duma, the lower house of parliament, a choice that could do much to shape their country's future, including its relations with the West.With Boris N. Yeltsin's presidency a shambles and the Duma dominated by the naysaying Communist Party and its allies, Russians growing ever more desperate for better lives appear ready for change.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 18, 1999
MOSCOW -- Former Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov united with Moscow Mayor Yuri Luzhkov yesterday in a broad-based coalition that many analysts say is positioned to dominate Russia's parliamentary elections in December and undercut President Boris N. Yeltsin's hopes of installing his chosen successor in next year's presidential elections.The union of Primakov and Luzhkov, two of the best-known political figures in Russia, could enable the new Fatherland-All Russia political movement to capture control of the now-Communist-dominated State Duma, the lower house of parliament, then vault toward the 2000 presidential elections, analysts said.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | May 19, 1999
PARIS -- Until last Wednesday, Russia seemed to have recovered something resembling orderly government under Prime Minister Yevgeny Primakov, reclaiming an important international role through its intervention in the Yugoslav-NATO crisis.But internal and external forces have combined to put an end to that, relegating Russia to what may prove a serious internal ordeal. President Boris Yeltsin's dismissal of Mr. Primakov has been reported as a capricious act, but it followed logically from the threat to the president posed by the impeachment process by the Russian parliament, which, ultimately, failed.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 16, 1999
MOSCOW -- After a year of parliamentary roaring, efforts to impeach President Boris N. Yeltsin ended with a whimper yesterday. All five charges against the president were defeated, and by unexpected margins.On the third day of hearings, the Communist-inspired accusations ranging from genocide to destruction of the Soviet Union gradually lost their potency. Instead, several politicians turned the debate into an indictment of all Russian leaders and a melancholy reverie on the sins of their forebears.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 13, 1999
MOSCOW -- Sergei V. Stepashin has been referred to in the Russian press as a "rosy-cheeked hawk." Behind the boyish face lies ambition and toughness.No doubt Stepashin, named yesterday as acting prime minister in Russia, will need a thick skin. Tapped to succeed the popular Yevgeny M. Primakov, Stepashin might have a difficult time winning confirmation in parliament.The 47-year-old lawyer, who has longtime ties to Russian and Soviet security forces, is a Kremlin favorite. President Boris N. Yeltsin reportedly considers him one of his most loyal aides and respects the power base Stepashin has established in little more than a year as interior minister.
NEWS
May 13, 1999
NOW the Washington crowd can appreciate the bafflement and dismay with which the world viewed the impeachment of President Clinton. Few beyond these shores cared or believed what it was about. Many were aghast that whatever they counted on from U.S. policy was at risk.In Russia today, the only thing that matters is the struggle between an ailing, fitfully able President Boris N. Yeltsin and the Communists and nationalists in the State Duma, or lower house of parliament, who would cut him down at any cost.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 13, 1999
MOSCOW -- President Boris N. Yeltsin threw Russia into political chaos yet again yesterday, dismissing popular Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov and presenting lawmakers with a do-or-die challenge on the eve of impeachment proceedings.A few hours later, Yeltsin warned that Russia may pull out as as mediator in the Kosovo crisis.The sudden actions opened the way for a constitutional crisis, unraveled the stability that Primakov had achieved, cast doubt on international help for Russia's economy and threatened to upset the Balkans peace process.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 17, 1999
MOSCOW -- Prime Minister Yevgeny Primakov, hoping to smooth U.S.-Russian relations in advance of a critical trip to Washington next week, intensified efforts yesterday to win ratification of the stalled START II missile treaty.The Communist-dominated Duma, Russia's lower house of parliament, opened the way Monday to renewed debate on the treaty but set no timetable. In a prime-time television interview, Primakov said ratification of the pact is essential to Russia's long-range security and relations with other countries.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 13, 1999
MOSCOW -- President Boris N. Yeltsin threw Russia into political chaos yet again yesterday, dismissing popular Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov and presenting lawmakers with a do-or-die challenge on the eve of impeachment proceedings.A few hours later, Yeltsin warned that Russia may pull out as as mediator in the Kosovo crisis.The sudden actions opened the way for a constitutional crisis, unraveled the stability that Primakov had achieved, cast doubt on international help for Russia's economy and threatened to upset the Balkans peace process.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 30, 1999
MOSCOW -- Flying into Yugoslavia today in hopes of finding a means to halt the NATO airstrikes, Russian Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov is trying to resuscitate Russian influence in the Balkans and just maybe pull off a diplomatic coup.Expectations here are low, but after Moscow's failure last week to prevent the NATO attack, Primakov has little to lose by trying."Everyone understands his mission is almost impossible," Vyacheslav Nikonov, head of the Polity Foundation, said yesterday.If a solution eludes Primakov today, Nikonov said, "it cannot be regarded as a failure of Russian diplomacy."
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