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By Amanda Ghingher and Amanda Ghingher,Contributing Writer | March 20, 1995
The Pride of Baltimore II, the floating goodwill ambassador of Maryland, has spent most of the past two weeks bone-dry, standing awkwardly on its keel in dry-dock.But today, the Pride II will get wet again, as the ship takes a short cruise to the warehouse that holds its masts and rigging."When the boat goes in the water it's a sign that spring is coming and that things are going great," said Michael C. McGeady, deputy director of the nonprofit organization that TC handles the boat's operations.
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NEWS
April 13, 2013
Kudos to the nonprofit Pride of Baltimore, Inc. for showing kids that learning can be fun, as was apparent in the published photographs ("Pride II takes to the bay as a floating classroom," April 11). But there was something blatantly missing - life jackets! Let's be sure to also use these learning excursions to teach the importance of water safety. Terry Callanan, Catonsville
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,Special to the Sun | April 25, 2004
When the Pride of Baltimore sank in a squall in the Atlantic in May 1986, many local leaders had no interest in building a replacement boat. The mayor, William Donald Schaefer, in particular considered it a bad idea. But the public felt differently. The same day that news of the sinking reached Baltimore, people began raising money for a new goodwill ship. A radio station launched an on-air drive, jars of pennies and dimes collected by children began arriving in the office of Pride of Baltimore Inc., and before long, local and state leaders committed to the idea.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2013
"When we say 'turtle,' you say 'power,'" Jamie Trost called out to a group of eighth-graders. And when the students from St. Jane Frances School in Pasadena hollered "power," they pulled hard on the ropes, hoisting the sails of the Pride of Baltimore II. It was the first part of a lesson, teaching the teens you can't give strong, coordinated tugs without a good grunt, and also how privateers during the War of 1812 got their sleek ships moving...
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON | November 30, 2005
The Pride of Baltimore II, the city-based clipper ship and Maryland goodwill ambassador, is being repaired by two French companies in Saint-Nazaire, France, and is set to return to the state in early spring, in time for the Volvo Ocean Race. The Pride II was severely damaged Sept. 5 when a rigging failure during a squall caused the ship's wooden bowsprit, foremast and mainmast to collapse while the ship was racing in the Bay of Biscay off the coast of France. Linda Christenson, executive director of Pride of Baltimore Inc., the nonprofit that manages the ship's fundraising and finances, said several European companies made bids to repair the ship.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | June 21, 1993
An odd, wedge-shaped vehicle built by College Park students began a 1,100-mile -- across the Midwest yesterday, fueled only by the power of sunshine.The University of Maryland's sleek, lightweight "Pride of Maryland II" joined a field of 33 other solar cars, which were to switch on electric motors at 9 a.m. for the first leg of a seven-day race from Arlington, Texas, to Minneapolis.The U.S. Department of Energy is sponsoring the contest, called "Sunrayce 93," which pits teams from 34 North American colleges and universities against each other in a test of engineering skill, solar car technology and road-racing skill.
NEWS
By Karen Zeiler and Karen Zeiler,Contributing Writer | October 30, 1993
The Pride of Baltimore II embarks on a 13-month public relations mission today to locales both tropical and arctic."We've scheduled first-time stops in Hawaii and Alaska," said W. Bruce Quackenbush Jr., executive director of the Pride of Baltimore Inc., the nonprofit corporation that operates the vessel. "Once we've completed that, we will have been to every major port in the U.S."The 12-member crew plans to reach Hawaii by May and Glacier Bay, Alaska, by mid-June."When the ship arrives in Tampa next month, it will have been to 100 ports and traveled 100,000 nautical miles," Mr. Quackenbush said.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 28, 2009
The captain and crew of Maryland's Pride of Baltimore II are turning to technology to tackle a centuries-old problem: how to keep the tall-masted clipper cruising comfortably when sails are unfurled and winds kick up. Seafarers say the challenge has grown more acute as masters and mates move from ship to ship with the seasons, producing new skippers who may not know enough about the conditions that could tilt the decks of classic vessels to uncomfortable, or...
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1997
Capt. Bob Glover stood on the dock at Mystic Seaport in Connecticut at nightfall on a cold March day and watched as director Steven Spielberg filmed Africans disembarking from the slave ship Amistad."
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | January 2, 1998
Daniel S. Parrott, who swabbed the decks of the original Pride of Baltimore and met his wife on the second one, rejoined the schooner this week to skipper a leg of its yearlong voyage to Asia.The Pride of Baltimore II appointed Parrott, 36, interim captain for 5,000-mile stretch from Panama to Hawaii. The trip amounts to a tryout for Parrott, the leading candidate to become one of the ship's two permanent captains."I'm delighted to be aboard," Parrott said yesterday, speaking by satellite phone as the Pride sailed in a warm, windy Caribbean about 240 miles east of the Panama Canal.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2010
Maryland's goodwill ship, the Pride of Baltimore II, now belongs to the private nonprofit organization that has maintained the vessel and run its educational and business development programs for many years. The state Board of Public Works voted Wednesday to transfer the ship's title to Pride of Baltimore Inc. "We look forward to continuing to fulfill the mission we have worked toward for more than 30 years," said Pride Inc.'s executive director, Linda Christenson. The group's leaders have sought ownership of the Pride II since 2007, when then-state Transportation Secretary John D. Porcari said the state could no longer afford its $164,000 annual subsidy for the ship's $900,000 annual operating costs.
NEWS
By Frank Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2010
Maryland's Department of Transportation asked the Board of Public Works on Wednesday to declare the state's goodwill ship Pride of Baltimore II to be "surplus property" so ownership can be transferred to the private nonprofit group that has operated the vessel since 1988. "We are confident that our organization is well-positioned to carry on that mission independently, and will continue to raise revenue for operations and success," said Linda Christenson, executive director of Pride of Baltimore Inc. The state paid $1 for title to the Pride II in 1989, after contributing $1 million in public funds toward the $4.5 million it cost to build the Baltimore clipper.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 28, 2009
The captain and crew of Maryland's Pride of Baltimore II are turning to technology to tackle a centuries-old problem: how to keep the tall-masted clipper cruising comfortably when sails are unfurled and winds kick up. Seafarers say the challenge has grown more acute as masters and mates move from ship to ship with the seasons, producing new skippers who may not know enough about the conditions that could tilt the decks of classic vessels to uncomfortable, or...
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun reporter | April 15, 2008
Children from Roye-Williams Elementary near Aberdeen had boned up on state history, wrapped up a week of standardized tests and arrived ready yesterday to assess their seamanship during a one-hour tour of Maryland's famous tall ship. With the waters of the Susquehanna River glistening in the background and a stiff breeze blowing through the rigging, the crew introduced the children to the Pride of Baltimore II, which had docked in the harbor at Havre de Grace for a four-day visit. As it makes its way to various ports along the Chesapeake Bay and beyond, this symbol of maritime heritage offers children hands-on learning aboard a Baltimore clipper, which was the fastest ship of its era, said Linda Christenson, executive director.
NEWS
By KARL MERTON FERRON and KARL MERTON FERRON,SUN REPORTER | May 21, 2006
What can a landlubber say about riding with a seasoned crew of the Pride of Baltimore II? My head still swims with the nautical terminology that I couldn't quite grasp. I boarded in Solomons for the two-day trip up Chesapeake Bay to the Pride's home port. It was intimidating, as I gingerly went below deck for the first time, wondering how many people busted their behinds after slipping on the almost-vertical stairs. Fortunately, I have not one mishap to report. Not that such thoughts didn't cross my mind.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON | December 4, 2005
The Pride of Baltimore II, the city-based clipper ship and Maryland goodwill ambassador, is being repaired by two companies in St.-Nazaire, France, and is set to return to the state in early spring, in time for the Volvo Ocean Race. The Pride II was severely damaged Sept. 5 when a rigging failure during a squall caused the ship's wooden bowsprit, foremast and mainmast to collapse while the ship was racing in the Bay of Biscay off the coast of France. Linda Christenson, executive director of Pride of Baltimore Inc., the nonprofit that manages the ship's fundraising and finances, said several European companies made bids to repair the ship.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1996
On deck once more is G. Peter Boudreau, skipper of the resurrection.Look for him tomorrow morning aboard the U.S.S. Constellation, a leaking, rotting, sagging, 142-year-old hulk of timbers that happens to be considered one of the country's most important historic naval vessels. He's the husky, mustachioed blond guy, the one who usually seems so calm and collected. He'll be in charge when a tugboat pulls the ship through the Inner Harbor ever so slowly, slower than a Sunday stroll through Harborplace.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON | November 30, 2005
The Pride of Baltimore II, the city-based clipper ship and Maryland goodwill ambassador, is being repaired by two French companies in Saint-Nazaire, France, and is set to return to the state in early spring, in time for the Volvo Ocean Race. The Pride II was severely damaged Sept. 5 when a rigging failure during a squall caused the ship's wooden bowsprit, foremast and mainmast to collapse while the ship was racing in the Bay of Biscay off the coast of France. Linda Christenson, executive director of Pride of Baltimore Inc., the nonprofit that manages the ship's fundraising and finances, said several European companies made bids to repair the ship.
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