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Pride And Prejudice

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By Mike Giuliano | June 28, 2012
Although Jane Austen lived nearly 200 years after William Shakespeare, they shared a literary sensitivity to the social rituals that make courtship such a trying experience. That's why it isn't much of a stretch for the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company to do a theatrical adaptation of Austen's novel "Pride and Prejudice" at the Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park in Ellicott City. "Pride and Prejudice" is a comedy of manners that resembles some of Shakespeare's comedies. A strong-minded young woman, Elizabeth Bennet, seems to enjoy fending off any romantic overtures made by the eligible bachelors swirling around her. Equally proud, Fitzwilliam Darcy seems to enjoy being rude to Elizabeth.
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By Linda Burkins and For The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Tired of traipsing from one big-box store to another? A visit to family-owned Washington Street Books and Music in Havre de Grace might be the change you need. More than a seller of unique books, Washington Street offers antiques, jewelry, sculptures, religious and new age items, and authentic movie and music memorabilia. Recent collectibles for sale include costumes worn in the hit film “The Hunger Games” and a guitar autographed by Katy Perry. The personable owner, John Klisavage, points out a life-size model of Anakin Skywalker.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 11, 2005
For [Jane] Austen," writes scholar Robert Polhemus, "love, like dance, ought to be a rational pursuit, leading to what is pleasurable, useful, and beautiful."
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By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
Rarely does a literary classic transfer from page to stage as eloquently as Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" does in the current production by the Annapolis Shakespeare Company at Bowie Playhouse. Everything works beautifully, beginning with Jon Jory's engaging stage adaptation, which is faithful to Austen's prose and yet holds its relevance to contemporary audiences. Sally Boyett-D'Angelo's smart direction of the dream cast she has assembled creates exciting theater, where every actor fully delivers.
FEATURES
November 11, 2005
THE QUESTION With yet another version of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice set to reach Baltimore today, we wonder: Is it merely the ultimate chick-film material or is there something universal about the story that keeps directors and actors lining up? WHAT YOU SAY I wonder if the remake of Pride and Prejudice is less a "chick flick" and more of a classic and a period film. With such films as Master and Commander, Alexander, Troy, Tom Sawyer, etc. I think classic stories are the new "fad" movies.
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By James Wilcox and James Wilcox,Los Angeles Times | December 5, 1993
Title: "Presumption"Author: Julia BarrettPublisher: M. Evans & Co.Length, price: 238 pages, $30Title: "Pemberley"Author: Emma TennantPublisher: St. Martin's PressLength, price: 184 pages, $18.95 "I am a Jane Austenite," E. M. Forster wrote in 1924, "and therefore slightly imbecile about Jane Austen. . . . I read and re-read, the mouth open and the mind closed. Shut up in measureless content, I greet her by the name of most kind hostess, while criticism slumbers."Whether or not the 2,700 members of the Jane Austen Society of North America are amused by Forster's idolatry, they cannot ignore two recent incursions onto sacred ground: Julia Barrett and Emma Tennant have both had the temerity to continue where "Pride and Prejudice" left off.By calling "Presumption" an "entertainment," Julia Braun Kessler and Gabrielle Donnelly (writing under the pseudonym Julia Barrett)
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | August 3, 2007
Becoming Jane isn't just a soap opera - it's a soft-soap opera. It tries to flatter audiences into accepting a fictionalized account of the real Jane Austen's love life as the basis for her novel Pride and Prejudice and, indeed, her entire literary output. It isn't a jolly, inventive piece of japery like Shakespeare in Love, which had the light touch and witty bravado to expand our pleasure in Shakespeare's plays by embroidering on them. Becoming Jane (Miramax) Starring Anne Hathaway, James McAvoy, Julie Walters, Maggie Smith, Laurence Fox. Directed by Julian Jarrold.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 13, 1996
The Arts & Entertainment cable channel has delivered some superb British programming in recent years, such as "Cracker," "The House of Eliott" and "A Touch of Frost." But "Pride and Prejudice," the lavish BBC/A&E co-production that starts tomorrow night at 9, sets a new benchmark in style, wit and charm.The six-hour adaptation of Jane Austen's account of the five Bennett sisters may be the best miniseries of the television year, with an almost mind-boggling amount of talent.For those who slept through high-school lit class and missed the television adaptation that aired a decade ago on "Masterpiece Theatre," "Pride and Prejudice" is one of the most beloved European novels in literature.
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By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2010
Arnold Blumberg plops the zombie head on a table at the front of the small theater. "I brought a friend," says the University of Baltimore professor, clad in an unbuttoned black shirt adorned with red skulls. Blumberg is meeting his class for the first time and it seems appropriate that he greet them beside "old Worm Eye," undead star of the 1979 Italian cult film "Zombi 2. " It was Worm Eye's decaying visage that called to a young Blumberg from the shelf of a Randallstown video store in the 1980s.
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By Michael Pakenham | September 15, 2002
Bad Press: The Worst Critical Reviews Ever, edited by Laura Ward (Barrons, 256 pages, $14.95). One of the great natural unfairnesses of life is that unkind reviews of books, plays, music -- whatever -- and especially vicious ones live on in memory and anthologies while favorable ones die young. Here, Ms. Wood, an irrepressible enthusiast for aesthetic savagery, has compiled a magnificent compendium of dismissals. Among my favorites: "The triumph of sugar over diabetes" -- George Jean Nathan on the writing of J.M. Barrie.
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By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
With her latest production, Annapolis Shakespeare Company founder and artistic director Sally Boyett-D'Angelo is expanding the young company's horizons, both artistically and physically. At a recent rehearsal of Jon Jory's adaptation of Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice," Boyett-D'Angelo announced the company will soon move to recently acquired space for rehearsals, offices, a costume shop and a performance studio, at 111 Chinquapin Round Road. It's the latest advancement under Boyett-D'Angelo's guidance.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | June 28, 2012
Although Jane Austen lived nearly 200 years after William Shakespeare, they shared a literary sensitivity to the social rituals that make courtship such a trying experience. That's why it isn't much of a stretch for the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company to do a theatrical adaptation of Austen's novel "Pride and Prejudice" at the Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park in Ellicott City. "Pride and Prejudice" is a comedy of manners that resembles some of Shakespeare's comedies. A strong-minded young woman, Elizabeth Bennet, seems to enjoy fending off any romantic overtures made by the eligible bachelors swirling around her. Equally proud, Fitzwilliam Darcy seems to enjoy being rude to Elizabeth.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2011
One of the ugliest chapters in American history seems all the more painful to recall right now, with the hideous toll of the earthquake and tsunami in Japan still climbing, still threatening. But that chapter — the prison camps for loyal American citizens of Japanese descent after the outbreak of World War II — provides the chilling backdrop of David Guterson's popular 1994 novel "Snow Falling on Cedars. " The book, which was turned into a film and, more recently, a play, spins a "To Kill a Mockingbird"-like tale of murder, suspicion and prejudice in the Pacific Northwest, early 1950s, filtered through the residue of anti-Japanese sentiment that the war left behind.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2010
Arnold Blumberg plops the zombie head on a table at the front of the small theater. "I brought a friend," says the University of Baltimore professor, clad in an unbuttoned black shirt adorned with red skulls. Blumberg is meeting his class for the first time and it seems appropriate that he greet them beside "old Worm Eye," undead star of the 1979 Italian cult film "Zombi 2. " It was Worm Eye's decaying visage that called to a young Blumberg from the shelf of a Randallstown video store in the 1980s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gene Seymour and Gene Seymour,Newsday | May 8, 2008
Thirteen years have passed since Colin Firth became, as Jane Austen might put it, "universally acknowledged" as the definitive Mr. Darcy in the lionized BBC TV miniseries of Austen's Pride and Prejudice. In the intervening time, the 47-year-old actor has established himself among worldwide audiences as a go-to guy when it comes to British romantic leads not played by Hugh Grant -- who was, you'll recall, Firth's rival in 2001's Bridget Jones's Diary. Firth describes Then She Found Me, which opens tomorrow, as straddling the edge of both his "serious" and "comedic" projects.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | August 3, 2007
Becoming Jane isn't just a soap opera - it's a soft-soap opera. It tries to flatter audiences into accepting a fictionalized account of the real Jane Austen's love life as the basis for her novel Pride and Prejudice and, indeed, her entire literary output. It isn't a jolly, inventive piece of japery like Shakespeare in Love, which had the light touch and witty bravado to expand our pleasure in Shakespeare's plays by embroidering on them. Becoming Jane (Miramax) Starring Anne Hathaway, James McAvoy, Julie Walters, Maggie Smith, Laurence Fox. Directed by Julian Jarrold.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 13, 2001
The film "Bridget Jones's Diary" is Renee Zellweger's triumph. She gives her all to the role of a lovelorn publicist at a London publishing house. Zellweger has a ticklish furriness reminiscent of Jean Arthur in her screwball comic prime. She rejuvenates even the most trifling and formulaic moments. Her acquisition of a British accent and about 20 additional pounds are the least of her accomplishments. Zellweger's Bridget can't be measured in weight gained, drinks imbibed, cigarettes smoked or calories eaten - to name the statistics that start each entry in Helen Fielding's fictional best seller of the same name.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gene Seymour and Gene Seymour,Newsday | May 8, 2008
Thirteen years have passed since Colin Firth became, as Jane Austen might put it, "universally acknowledged" as the definitive Mr. Darcy in the lionized BBC TV miniseries of Austen's Pride and Prejudice. In the intervening time, the 47-year-old actor has established himself among worldwide audiences as a go-to guy when it comes to British romantic leads not played by Hugh Grant -- who was, you'll recall, Firth's rival in 2001's Bridget Jones's Diary. Firth describes Then She Found Me, which opens tomorrow, as straddling the edge of both his "serious" and "comedic" projects.
NEWS
By Ella Taylor and Ella Taylor,Los Angeles Times | July 8, 2007
Austenland By Shannon Hale Bloomsbury / 198 pages / $19.95 Ask a woman to describe Fitzwilliam Darcy, the obstinately ineligible stiff who thaws under the lively wit of Elizabeth Bennet in Pride and Prejudice, and watch her eyes take on a lustful sheen as she conjures up the image of Colin Firth in the BBC adaptation of Jane Austen's novel, plunging shirtless into an icy English pond. Firth played another Darcy in Bridget Jones's Diary, suffering through one of Bridget's mum's awful parties in a reindeer sweater.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2006
Brokeback Mountain What It's About: A ranch hand (Heath Ledger) and a small-time rodeo man (Jake Gyllenhaal) fall in love herding sheep on Brokeback Mountain. Rated: R The scoop: It's pretty, tasteful and long, but if you're hungering for an old-fashioned male weepy, this is the one for you. Grade: C The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe What It's About: C.S. Lewis' classic tale of four British children going from the frying pan of London during the Blitz to the cold fire of a battle between good and evil in the fantastic parallel world of Narnia.
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