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Price War

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BUSINESS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,States News Service | July 27, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Could there be anything controversial about a pencil, the age-old instrument painted the color of school buses and sunshine?These days, the answer is yes.The school kid's most trusted possession is creating an international price war -- and the U.S. government is in the middle of the fray.Domestic pencil makers say cheap imports from the Peoples Republic of China and Thailand are jabbing at their business like newly sharpened No. 2's.U.S. manufacturers want the federal government to impose higher duties, which could double the price of the foreign-made goods.
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NEWS
October 30, 2009
The cavernous hangar at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware is an austere and imposing building, and it was altogether fitting that President Barack Obama should have gone there late Wednesday night to view the coffins of 18 soldiers and Drug Enforcement Administration agents who were killed in Afghanistan this week. The president met with bereaved family members and stood at attention to honor the sacrifice of each of those killed in service to their country. Mr. Obama's appearance at Dover was a poignant reminder to all of us of the sacrifices being made by our troops.
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NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau The New York Times News Service contributed to this article | April 3, 1993
NEW YORK -- In a move that blindsided Wall Street and could signify a fundamental shift in the way cigarettes are marketed, Philip Morris Cos. announced yesterday that it would fight discount cigarette companies head to head by offering huge discounts to protect its faltering line of Marlboro cigarettes.Industry analysts said the decision meant a price war -- a radical shift for an industry in which most companies had combatted declining levels of smoking by raising prices.More discount pricing is also likely to raise health concerns, coming as it does amid signs that the growing popularity of cheaper, generic cigarettes has helped attract new smokers and temporarily slowed the 30-year decline in smokers.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | October 21, 2009
Kevin Crowley's job as a computer salesman for Hewlett-Packard requires a lot of travel, and lately his company is telling him to do it as cheaply as possibly. So even though the Montgomery County resident could fly from any of three nearby airports, he usually bypasses Reagan National and Dulles in search of the cheapest fares. "If I'm going to fly, it's normally going to be from BWI," Crowley said after checking in for a flight to Orlando this week. He said the airport is also easier to drive to than others in the region.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | March 23, 1997
DETROIT -- There doesn't seem to be a price war breaking out on the car lots.When car sales slumped in February for Detroit automakers, one reason given was aggressive pricing by Japanese car companies.Some industry analysts even suggested Japan's automakers launched a price war, using low-ball leases to carve more market share from the Big Three.If there is a price war, it's a quiet one."We had better prices on Accords six months ago," said Charlie Pernik, president of a Honda dealership near Detroit.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 14, 2004
NEW YORK - In the latest series of price cuts by low-cost airlines, JetBlue slashed fares as much as 50 percent yesterday on a million seats. The move by the New York airline prompted some analysts to worry that low-cost carriers are leading the industry into a midsummer price war that could damage larger airlines' profits. Under JetBlue's summer sale, New York travelers can snag fares ranging from $49 to $99 to more than 20 cities in the United States, Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1994
Philip Morris profits up 17.6%Philip Morris Cos. Inc. posted a second-quarter profit increase of 17.6 percent yesterday as its domestic tobacco business led by Marlboro turned in its best performance since last year's cigarette price war.Philip Morris ignited a domestic price war in the spring of 1993 when it effectively cut the price of the world's best-selling brand by about 40 cents a pack to discourage smokers from switching from Marlboros to cheaper smokes.The...
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2001
Gasoline prices in the metro area are falling - but not this low. Gilbert Hunt could hardly believe his eyes yesterday morning when he rounded the curve on U.S. 1, just south of the Conowingo Dam, and saw the $1.339-a-gallon gas signs at the Royal Farms store near the Harford County town of Dublin. The Wilmington, Del., construction worker had detoured from Interstate 95 to avoid a traffic jam. "This is great. That accident saved me nearly $10," he said after filling the tank of his Ford Expedition.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | November 25, 2002
SOMEDAY WE'LL BE telling the grandkids about the great Turkey Wars of Thanksgiving '02, when the price of a bird dropped quicker than tech stock, and the supermarkets were practically giving the stuff away. Don't believe me? Check out the newspaper ads, friend. It's like the retail version of the Bloods vs. the Crips. Except every other day another store seems to jump into the rumble. Safeway announces a sale price of 39 cents a pound for frozen turkeys, which matches SuperFresh. Giant drops its price to 33, which is quickly matched by SuperFresh.
NEWS
February 5, 1991
War flared briefly again at Jumpers Hole Road and Ritchie Highway last week. In a few hours of madness, Shell fought back with everything it had.It was crazy. Imagine, dropping the price of regular unleaded to $1.079 -- 7 cents below cost and 2 cents below the price then being charged by the Exxon station diagonally across Ritchie Highway."Just clowning around," said Shawn Kingston, the owner of the Shell station, explaining the drastic price cut. He smiled and looked across Ritchie Highway at the enemy camp, Exxon, which in December declared a price war on the four corners where Exxon, Shell, Amoco and Chevron outlets compete.
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | April 30, 2006
Everyone is familiar with the signs that shout out the cost of driving these days, the ones that say $2.97, $3.08, $3.16, $3.27, that chronicle the rising price of a gallon of gasoline. Those signs get the public fuming, the politicians posturing and the president investigating. But there are many other signs of the cost of America's love affair with the automobile that seem to fade into the background like drab wallpaper. Take those small memorials - the crosses, the plastic flowers, the teddy bears - that mark the site of a death by automobile.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 5, 2004
Drops in pricing for two major Internet phone services signal the start of a price war as providers struggle to attract consumer attention, according to some analysts. The rate cuts raise the question of whether anyone will ever make money selling Internet-phone service, which is also known as voice over Internet protocol, or VoIP. But AT&T Corp. and Vonage Holdings Corp., the two providers who slashed monthly fees by $5, have differing takes on whether further cuts will be necessary. "We think it's probably pretty much bottomed out," AT&T spokesman Kerry Hibbs said.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 14, 2004
NEW YORK - In the latest series of price cuts by low-cost airlines, JetBlue slashed fares as much as 50 percent yesterday on a million seats. The move by the New York airline prompted some analysts to worry that low-cost carriers are leading the industry into a midsummer price war that could damage larger airlines' profits. Under JetBlue's summer sale, New York travelers can snag fares ranging from $49 to $99 to more than 20 cities in the United States, Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | November 25, 2002
SOMEDAY WE'LL BE telling the grandkids about the great Turkey Wars of Thanksgiving '02, when the price of a bird dropped quicker than tech stock, and the supermarkets were practically giving the stuff away. Don't believe me? Check out the newspaper ads, friend. It's like the retail version of the Bloods vs. the Crips. Except every other day another store seems to jump into the rumble. Safeway announces a sale price of 39 cents a pound for frozen turkeys, which matches SuperFresh. Giant drops its price to 33, which is quickly matched by SuperFresh.
BUSINESS
By Marc Ballon and Marc Ballon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 18, 2002
While McDonald's Corp. and other burger chains have slugged it out with 99-cent Big Macs and 49-cent hamburgers, Wendy's International Inc., the company best known for its square hamburgers, has stayed out of the fray, keeping intact its profits and the reputation it claims for quality. The company, which has generated strong sales by offering generally pricier fare than competitors, has rejected the margin-killing strategy of heavy discounting rampant in the fast-food industry. Slashing prices can cheapen the value of products over time in consumers' minds and even tarnish a company's image, said Wendy's Chief Executive Officer John T. Schuessler.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2001
Gasoline prices in the metro area are falling - but not this low. Gilbert Hunt could hardly believe his eyes yesterday morning when he rounded the curve on U.S. 1, just south of the Conowingo Dam, and saw the $1.339-a-gallon gas signs at the Royal Farms store near the Harford County town of Dublin. The Wilmington, Del., construction worker had detoured from Interstate 95 to avoid a traffic jam. "This is great. That accident saved me nearly $10," he said after filling the tank of his Ford Expedition.
NEWS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1998
We've all seen it: cheaper prices at the computer store, athletic-shoe emporium or gasoline pump. We probably don't think much about it, beyond congratulating ourselves for finding a good bargain. But some pundits and economists are speculating that these "bargains" are the leading edge of deflation, a general decline in prices for goods and services that can be just as ruinous as inflation.As is always true in economics, there's a lot of debate and no real agreement. Most economists believe that the U.S. economy is in pretty fair shape and that, if anything, we must remain vigilant about inflation -- a tendency toward rising prices that has been pretty much the norm since World War II. But there is a group, albeit a small one, whose members say sectors of the world economy show signs of harmful deflation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Gillmor and Dan Gillmor,SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS | June 11, 2001
IF YOU'RE READING this in a newspaper, you're using a medium that's been centuries in the making and doesn't have all that much room for technical improvement. But if you're reading it on a screen - a standard video or liquid-crystal display - the best is definitely ahead. Displays are a relatively unsung, though vital, piece of the technology world. The industry has given us better products at lower prices in recent years. But displays don't improve at the pace of Moore's Law, which helps double processing power on a regular basis, so we don't see the jaw-dropping changes that mark so many other technology products.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Gillmor and Dan Gillmor,SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS | June 11, 2001
IF YOU'RE READING this in a newspaper, you're using a medium that's been centuries in the making and doesn't have all that much room for technical improvement. But if you're reading it on a screen - a standard video or liquid-crystal display - the best is definitely ahead. Displays are a relatively unsung, though vital, piece of the technology world. The industry has given us better products at lower prices in recent years. But displays don't improve at the pace of Moore's Law, which helps double processing power on a regular basis, so we don't see the jaw-dropping changes that mark so many other technology products.
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