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Price Increases

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By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,Sun Reporter | December 18, 2007
An Orioles spokesman confirmed yesterday that the club has raised season ticket prices for select seats at Camden Yards for 2008, the first such increase in several years. "Camden Yards remains affordable to everyone as a season-plan holder or on an individual basis," said Greg Bader, the Orioles' director of communications. "A select number of season tickets have increased one to three dollars for the first time in four seasons, as we remain committed to creating the premier ballpark experience to everyone who attends an Orioles game."
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
The Baltimore school system is raising the price of student lunches to $3 - one of the highest among the nation's large, urban districts - under a plan that also provides free meals to every low-income student. The price is up from $2.35 for elementary and middle school students and $2.65 for high school students. Some parents could end up spending $117 more this school year under the price increase, which is the fourth in seven years and the largest in that time. Others will save because their children will no longer have to pay the 40 cents charged for a reduced-price meal.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2012
The home Azam Khan sold on Fairbank Road in Northwest Baltimore last month strikes the real estate agent as a prime example of market shift. It changed hands for about $25,000 more than each of the similar Cape Cods that sold on the street last year - and it's smaller to boot. In a growing number of Baltimore-area neighborhoods, home prices have stopped their years-long march downward. Some areas have stabilized. Some actually are heading up. "The traditionally stronger neighborhoods are definitely on the rise," said Khan, who represented the seller of the three-bedroom, $312,000 home on Fairbank Road in Mount Washington.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
Columbia chemical maker W.R. Grace & Co. said Thursday that it took a hit to sales in the second quarter as a price increase prompted customers to jump ship. Investors didn't like that news, pressing the stock price down $5.33 a share — more than 6 percent — to $78.45 at market's close. Grace's revenue fell about 3 percent in the three months ending June 30, to $802.8 million, compared with the year-earlier period. Profit rose — nearly 20 percent — but that was driven in part by an approximately $20 million drop in asbestos-related costs.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 20, 1991
MOSCOW -- Despite a worsening strike by coal miners that appears to be gaining broad political support, President Mikhail S. Gorbachev ordered sharp price increases yesterday in food and consumer goods to begin in two weeks.With a decree making official what aides already had outlined, Mr. Gorbachev took on the most explosive issue of Soviet economic reform -- ending once and for all the illusion that socialism means low, fixed prices for necessities."Without reform of pricing, there can be no kind of market," Prime Minister Valentin S. Pavlov, who helped design the plan, told television viewers last night.
NEWS
By New York Times | February 19, 1991
MOSCOW -- Soviet consumers are bracing for sweeping price increases of no less than 60 percent under the Kremlin's latest plan to revive the critically troubled economy.The government of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev yesterday promised to provide compensation through wages and pensions for up to 85 percent of the higher prices, which are to affect everything but three Soviet necessities: medicine, fuel and vodka.The plan, which has been submitted to the national Parliament, is an alternative to the rapid scrapping of economic Communism considered and rejected last year by Gorbachev.
NEWS
December 23, 1999
BASEBALL players talk about being "in the zone," that state of mind when everything seems to go right: Pitchers throw nothing but strikes; batters go on phenomenal hitting streaks.The nation's economy is on such a tear. Every economic report brings more positive news.More people are working, their incomes are steady and best of all, prices -- with the exception of the stock market -- barely increase.Yet skeptics keep reminding us that these prosperous conditions can't continue indefinitely.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2005
The future cost of homeowner insurance hangs in the balance as the damage tally from Hurricane Katrina crystallizes, but industry experts remain optimistic that any widespread rate increases will be nominal. Coastal Maryland is distant enough from the most hurricane-prone places to avoid significant leaps in homeowner coverage that might smack other coastal areas. But Maryland residents who own property in Florida or Louisiana, or other high-risk areas, should watch for those premiums to jump as much as 10 percent or 15 percent, some experts warn.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | November 9, 1990
Weaker-than-expected demand for sheets of steel has sparked Bethlehem Steel Corp. to partially back away from its previously announced price increase.Company spokesman Henry Von Spreckelsen said Bethlehem has reduced price increases to 4 percent from 8 percent. The 8 percent increase, announced three weeks ago, was to affect the sheets of steel used by automakers, appliance manufacturers and machine shops.Industry experts said they expect other steel producers to also cut back pending price increases.
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Sun Staff Writer | April 2, 1994
The cost of an Oriole Park meal will rise this year, but families that order carefully should be able to skirt some of the higher prices.Beer, soft drinks, hot dogs and nachos -- ballpark cuisine at its finest -- are scheduled for increases, according to price lists released yesterday.Joe Foss, Orioles vice chairman for business operations, attributed some of the price increases to higher-quality foods being served this season.This year, concession stands and vendors will offer only all-beef hot dogs, and kosher will replace kosher-style franks, he said.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2013
U.S. home prices last month saw their largest jump in more than six years, but the gains in metro Baltimore were much smaller than the national average. Nationwide, home prices increased 8.3 percent in December compared with a year earlier. In Greater Baltimore, the increase was 1.8 percent, according to a report released Tuesday by real estate data firm CoreLogic. The national increase was the largest since May 2006, according to CoreLogic's figures, and December marked the tenth consecutive month of U.S. home price increases.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar | January 10, 2013
December was another positive month for home sales in metro Baltimore, though the market supply of homes continued to dwindle, dropping below 10,000 for the first time since February 2006. Last month, 1,945 home sales closed in Baltimore and its five surrounding counties, according to data released Monday by RealEstate Business Intelligence LLC, an affiliate of the region's multiple-listing service. That's a 3.6 percent drop from November, but a nearly 13 percent year-over-year increase.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
December was another positive month for home sales in metropolitan Baltimore, though the market supply of homes continued to dwindle, dropping below 10,000 for the first time since February 2006. Last month, 1,945 home sales closed in Baltimore and its five surrounding counties, according to data released by RealEstate Business Intelligence LLC, an affiliate of the region's multiple-listing service. That's a 3.6 percent drop from November, but nearly a 13 percent increase over December 2011.
FEATURES
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2012
Wooded land is plentiful around The Pointe at ArundelPreserve, a subdivision at one end of a massive mixed-use development off Arundel Mills Boulevard in Hanover. But as is happening throughout Maryland, finished home lots — barren plats that are ready for the erection of new homes — are becoming few and far between at the 268-acre planned community, which also contains a hotel, restaurants and offices. Builders were eager to lock up lots in this locale, according to the Pointe's developer.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2012
The home Azam Khan sold on Fairbank Road in Northwest Baltimore last month strikes the real estate agent as a prime example of market shift. It changed hands for about $25,000 more than each of the similar Cape Cods that sold on the street last year - and it's smaller to boot. In a growing number of Baltimore-area neighborhoods, home prices have stopped their years-long march downward. Some areas have stabilized. Some actually are heading up. "The traditionally stronger neighborhoods are definitely on the rise," said Khan, who represented the seller of the three-bedroom, $312,000 home on Fairbank Road in Mount Washington.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
The National Aquarium's eight dolphins are no longer a show unto themselves. After two decades of dramatic leaps and crowd-pleasing stunts, aquarium officials are eliminating the 20-minute dolphin shows in favor of a more open-ended exhibit. Beginning Friday, aquarium visitors will be able to visit the dolphin amphitheater throughout the day and interact with trainers. Instead of charging a separate admission price for the dolphin show, the aquarium is raising general admission ticket prices.
BUSINESS
By Eben Shapiro and Eben Shapiro,New York Times News Service | September 17, 1991
After two years of fending off rival snack food companies with price cuts, coupons and costly promotions, Frito-Lay Inc. announced big changes yesterday to lower its cost of doing business.The battles between market leader Frito-Lay, No. 2 Borden Inc. and third-place Eagle Snacks Inc. have lowered the profits of all the major makers of potato and corn chips, pretzels and other salty snacks. But the competition has been a boon to consumers, who have become less tolerant of price increases.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1993
Chrysler raising pricesChrysler Corp. followed Ford Motor Co. yesterday in boosting prices on 1993 car and truck models an average of $31, or 0.2 percent. The No. 3 automaker also said it was raising destination charges, which are added to sticker prices, an average of $25.Chrysler's action came a week after Ford raised its 1993 model prices an average of $84, or 0.4 percent. General Motors Corp. said its prices are constantly being reviewed, but it did not anticipate immediate price increases.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2012
T. Rowe Price Group increased its quarterly dividend to 34 cents per share, up from 31 cents, the Baltimore money manager announced Thursday. This is the 26th straight year that Price has increased its annual dividend since the company went public in 1986. The quarterly dividend will be paid March 29 to shareholders of record as of March 15. Hanah.cho@baltsun.com
NEWS
By Ron Smith | August 12, 2010
If you type "college costs bubble" into an Internet search engine as I did recently, you'll find quite the list of news stories and opinion pieces focused on the fact that the costs of higher education have risen so quickly and reached such heights that they are obviously unsustainable. "Unsustainability" is a word we see more and more as the economy continues its weakness. Public worker pension costs are described that way, having been sustained thus far only by tapping the federal Treasury to bail out the many states that can't meet their pension liabilities.
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