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NEWS
By Steve Chapman | September 12, 2005
WASHINGTON - When Rudyard Kipling said it was a great virtue "if you can keep your head when all about you are losing theirs and blaming it on you," he was not thinking of Sen. Maria Cantwell, a Democrat from Washington. This week, as gasoline prices remained above $3 a gallon, she proposed giving the president the power to tell retailers what they can charge at the pump. A lot of people grew anxious seeing long lines forming the week before last, as motorists rushed to fill their tanks in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.
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NEWS
By Scott Eldridge | July 4, 2013
The Food and Drug Administration's plans to streamline the approval process for "breakthrough" drugs that treat life-threatening diseases is great news for patients and has enormous potential for our pharmaceutical industry, already in the midst of an innovation explosion. Unfortunately, in the middle of all this progress, political leaders in Washington are pushing proposals that would severely undermine innovation and deliver a crippling blow to Maryland's biotech industry. Lawmakers must understand that without a favorable policy environment, innovation can grind to a halt.
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NEWS
By MARIO VILLARREAL | September 29, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Tragedy and need frequently give weight to arguments for increased government intervention in the economy. Times of crisis - such as we are experiencing now in the aftermath of two hurricanes - inevitably result in a ratcheting up of government spending and additional regulatory controls. A case in point is the consideration, once again, of price-gouging laws. Maryland Del. James W. Hubbard, a Prince George's County Democrat, is working on legislation that would grant Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. authority to impose price controls on certain key supplies, such as gas, during emergencies.
NEWS
By Curt I. Civin and Stephen C. Schimpff | December 7, 2011
Hospitals nationwide are experiencing shortages of critical generic intravenous drugs. We believe a fundamental reason for this national shortage is government price controls. With these limits, there is little incentive to invest in new facilities and technologies, leading to equipment failures. Manufacturers have little economic incentive to prepare for the quality assurance issues that routinely arise in the manufacturing of a sterile injectable compound. To reincentivize this process, the market needs to be free, spurring more manufacturers to produce these drugs, and encouraging reinvestment in facilities and the stockpiling of reserves.
NEWS
February 27, 1997
IT IS THE biggest consumer rip-off of the General Assembly session. It means higher prices for milk, cottage cheese, low-fat ice cream, yogurt and frozen yogurt. It means an end to discount food coupons for these products. It means government controls.Moreover, this proposal for state-mandated prices for milk and milk products would wind up hurting the very people it is $H supposed to help: Maryland's dairy farmers. The bill ought to be killed in committee, but a motley crew of conservative Republicans, inner-city lawmakers, the Teamsters union and Gov. Parris Glendening is promoting this outrageous plan as a "fairness" issue that somehow will save jobs.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 4, 2000
WASHINGTON - Drug makers, who for years have successfully resisted government intervention that could lead to price controls on their products, have suddenly become fearful of the political quick fix. Their wondrous concoctions have saved lives, alleviated suffering and changed the nature of health care by often eliminating the need for surgery and hospitalization. Pills can lower cholesterol, take the itch out of allergies, make depression bearable and restore sexual function. But increasingly, longtime Republican friends of the pharmaceutical industry are joining traditional Democratic foes in complaining that these wonder drugs cost too much -at least 50 percent more in the United States than in neighboring Canada and Mexico, and often well beyond the means of those without health insurance.
NEWS
March 13, 1997
WARNING TO state legislators: Non semper ea sunt quae videntur, as the Roman fables writer Phaedrus put it. Things are not always what they seem. For proof, look at bills advancing in the legislature to set milk price controls.The goal is to help Maryland dairy farmers, who have been staggered by the public's declining taste for milk even as production per cow soars. The solution: Artificially inflate milk prices at the wholesale and retail levels.In reality, these bills will almost certainly force retailers to reduce, not increase, their purchase of raw milk from Maryland farmers.
NEWS
August 22, 2011
I see that Republican candidate Michele Bachmann is now "guaranteeing" gas will be $2 a gallon if she becomes president. Wow! As anyone familiar with the free market knows, there is only one way to guarantee that gas is going to be at the price set by a politician - price controls. Even the "lefty" President Obama hasn't suggested that. That puts Michele Bachmann to the left of Obama and the Democrats in Congress, even that lefty Bernie Sanders fromVermont. So in one day, Michele Bachmann has gone from right-wing darling to the very thing she claims to hate: a socialist!
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | August 25, 2005
WITH OIL prices setting records, the word crisis is being used and all sorts of political solutions are being proposed. Is there really a crisis? One of the dictionary definitions of a crisis is "the point in the course of a serious disease at which a decisive change occurs, leading either to recovery or to death." Is that where we are when it comes to oil? Are we either going to solve the problem of oil or see it destroy us economically? In political semantics, the word crisis has come to mean any situation that someone wants to use to justify doing something that will be called a solution.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | February 14, 2011
Economists and big-business types will tell you that government price controls are a loser's game, doomed to harm consumers and producers alike. It's mainly true. President Richard M. Nixon's 1971 price controls caused shortages and failed to snuff inflation. Botched price administration contributed mightily to the fall of the Soviet Union. Electricity price controls drove California utilities into bankruptcy a decade ago. So you might wonder why two weeks ago power companies such as BGE parent Constellation Energy frantically urged Washington to slap price controls on electricity.
NEWS
August 22, 2011
I see that Republican candidate Michele Bachmann is now "guaranteeing" gas will be $2 a gallon if she becomes president. Wow! As anyone familiar with the free market knows, there is only one way to guarantee that gas is going to be at the price set by a politician - price controls. Even the "lefty" President Obama hasn't suggested that. That puts Michele Bachmann to the left of Obama and the Democrats in Congress, even that lefty Bernie Sanders fromVermont. So in one day, Michele Bachmann has gone from right-wing darling to the very thing she claims to hate: a socialist!
NEWS
By William Yeatman | August 8, 2011
Ratepayers are steamed at Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. for turning off air conditioners in thousands of homes on July 22, the hottest day in 75 years. Their outrage, however, is misdirected. Blame for this indoor heat wave lies with the government in Annapolis, not with a utility in Baltimore. BGE customers were left without climate control in 110-degree heat because politicians don't trust their constituents with the thermostat. Hot days are a threat to reliable electricity service because surges in the use of energy-intensive air conditioners can overwhelm the grid.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | February 14, 2011
Economists and big-business types will tell you that government price controls are a loser's game, doomed to harm consumers and producers alike. It's mainly true. President Richard M. Nixon's 1971 price controls caused shortages and failed to snuff inflation. Botched price administration contributed mightily to the fall of the Soviet Union. Electricity price controls drove California utilities into bankruptcy a decade ago. So you might wonder why two weeks ago power companies such as BGE parent Constellation Energy frantically urged Washington to slap price controls on electricity.
NEWS
By Jacob Heilbrunn | June 26, 2008
Here we go again. Soaring oil prices have sent Washington politicians into overdrive to come up with a variety of legislative plans that aim to lower the cost of energy by targeting oil companies. Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama, for example, has declared: "I'll make oil companies like Exxon pay a tax on their windfall profits, and we'll use the money to help families pay for their skyrocketing energy costs and other bills." It may sound good in theory, but if history is any guide, this is a pipe dream.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | October 31, 2005
CHICAGO -- When the history of the Federal Reserve is written, one of its most important chapters will cover the period from 1979 to 2006, when the Fed was under the stewardship of Paul A. Volcker and then Alan Greenspan. That chapter will have a simple title: "The Conquest of Inflation." For those who have grown up in an era of price stability, this might sound like an achievement on the order of kicking sand in the face of a 98-pound weakling. They don't realize that in 1980, inflation hit the blood-curdling level of 14.8 percent.
NEWS
By MARIO VILLARREAL | September 29, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Tragedy and need frequently give weight to arguments for increased government intervention in the economy. Times of crisis - such as we are experiencing now in the aftermath of two hurricanes - inevitably result in a ratcheting up of government spending and additional regulatory controls. A case in point is the consideration, once again, of price-gouging laws. Maryland Del. James W. Hubbard, a Prince George's County Democrat, is working on legislation that would grant Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. authority to impose price controls on certain key supplies, such as gas, during emergencies.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 13, 1994
WASHINGTON -- They talk a good game about compromising on health reform, but President Clinton and members of Congress are really playing on a small field, with few options if they want to reach the goal of guaranteed insurance for all Americans.The Congressional Budget Office made that clear last week, laying out a road map to reform that shows no easy routes to universal coverage. Any plan that seeks to accomplish this will require huge new revenues and tough cost controls -- steps that would test the political courage and ingenuity of Congress.
NEWS
By Morton Kondracke | April 28, 2004
WASHINGTON -- Despite fierce opposition from the Bush administration and evidence that it's multiply dangerous to the nation's health, pressure is mounting to legalize mass drug importation from overseas. And it's coming not only from Democrats such as John Kerry, but from Republicans as well. Lately, the conservative Republican governors of Minnesota and New Hampshire, Tim Pawlenty and Craig Benson, have defied federal law to set up Web sites enabling their citizens to import drugs from Canada.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | September 12, 2005
WASHINGTON - When Rudyard Kipling said it was a great virtue "if you can keep your head when all about you are losing theirs and blaming it on you," he was not thinking of Sen. Maria Cantwell, a Democrat from Washington. This week, as gasoline prices remained above $3 a gallon, she proposed giving the president the power to tell retailers what they can charge at the pump. A lot of people grew anxious seeing long lines forming the week before last, as motorists rushed to fill their tanks in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | September 2, 2005
WASHINGTON - Some consumers, lawmakers and other leaders are calling for gasoline price controls after Hurricane Katrina's devastating impact on domestic oil and gasoline production sent prices soaring over $3 a gallon in many places. But economists overwhelmingly say price caps hurt consumers more than they help. Yesterday, Hawaii became the nation's first state to begin controlling gasoline prices, placing limits on wholesalers Chevron Corp. and Tesoro Corp., which own the state's two refineries.
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