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June 9, 2011
I read with interest the letters from Dr. Eric Naumburg and Dr. Jerry L. Levine. They both brought up interesting points. As a member of the Howard County Citizens Association's emergency-room committee I was closely involved with the organizing of the HCCA health care forum, and our main goal was to do something about the problems we have now. For a long-term solution, a single-payer system may well provide a solution to the problems of the...
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NEWS
September 24, 2014
A recent exchange within your opinion pages debated the benefit of over-the-counter access to oral contraceptives, with a letter to the editor ( "Sun wrong on OTC birth control," Sept. 16) citing the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists as being supportive of recent proposals from Congressional candidates across the country. But there's a disclaimer to our support: while ACOG does believe that many oral contraceptives are safe and effective for over-the-counter use, and we would welcome this new level of access for some women, we strongly believe that this is not enough.
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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | May 12, 1992
WASHINGTON -- As part of a broader effort this week to highlight his domestic agenda, President Bush will visit a Baltimore program tomorrow that emphasizes preventive health care services for poor people.Mr. Bush is scheduled to tour the East Baltimore Medical Center run by John Hopkins Hospital tomorrow afternoon and to address a group of business leaders later at nearby Dunbar High School. He will be promoting legislation that would make it easier for states to require patients whose health care is financed by Medicaid to enroll in similar programs.
HEALTH
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
A network of Catholic employers is temporarily exempt from the federal government's requirement to provide free birth control coverage for workers, a federal court has ruled. The ruling this week by an Oklahoma judge grants a preliminary injunction for some members of the Catholic Benefits Association, an organization of religious employers that owns an insurance company and is led by Archbishop William Lori of Baltimore. The CBA and other Catholic groups filed a class action lawsuit against the federal government in March, asking to be freed from the Affordable Care Act's requirement to provide contraceptive coverage without a co-pay.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | November 5, 1992
Looking down his office driveway at the wooden ranch-style sign, the rusty horse trailer, chicken coop and Jerseys grazing in the back pasture, it might be difficult to place Dr. Melvin Stern on the cutting edge of a hot national issue.But walk up along the split-rail fence and into his crowded waiting room, and his agenda might be easier to understand."For every dollar spent immunizing kids, we save $10 in potential cost for caring for sick kids," says Dr. Stern, sitting in his cramped inner office overlooking the pasture.
NEWS
By Robert Pear and Robert Pear,New York Times News Service | June 19, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In a departure from longstanding practice in the health insurance industry, which has emphasized the treatment and cure of disease without paying for much preventive care, Blue Cross and Blue Shield offered yesterday to provide insurance for routine tests to detect cancer, heart disease and other illnesses.The Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association issued guidelines for a lifetime schedule of medical tests to detect adult diseases and said it would offer coverage for these services.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer Staff writer Jackie Powder contributed to this article | December 23, 1993
The Clinton administration dispatched two top officials to Maryland yesterday to tout its health care reform package, each promising the plan would improve the health of the nation's children by covering preventive care.Carol M. Browner, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, toured the lead poisoning prevention clinic at the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, which currently treats 800 children who have high levels of lead in their blood.She said the reform package, which goes before Congress next year, would widen the use of blood-lead screenings by mandating insurance coverage.
NEWS
June 20, 1991
When half the beds at Johns Hopkins Hospital are filled with people whose illnesses or injuries could have been prevented, insurance coverage for preventive medical care seems to be common sense. Yet many insurance policies do not cover the simple procedures that can detect problems before they mushroom into serious, expensive conditions. Why? Because, too often, employers are not prepared to pay increased fees up front for savings down the line.Even so, this week the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association announced new guidelines for its 73 independent member plans, recommending that they provide coverage for routine screenings for such conditions as breast cancer, lung cancer, heart disease, diabetes, thyroid disease and osteoporosis.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | July 31, 2012
Women will have access to free health services for certain procedures under health care reform that go into affect tomorrow. The health benefits, a result of the Mikulski Women's Preventive Health Amendment, guarantee that women will receive, at no cost, an annual women's health exam to screen for the leading causes of death among women. It also requires all health plans to cover comprehensive women's preventive care and screenings with no copayments. Maryland Sen. Barbara Mikulski joined other Congressional Democrats Tuesday in announcing the new services.
NEWS
By Roni Rabin and Roni Rabin,NEWSDAY | May 12, 2004
A report card that evaluated the quality of U.S. health care has concluded that American adults receive only about half of the treatments recommended for both acute and chronic conditions and half the recommended preventive care. The Rand Corp. report, based on one of the largest studies of health care quality ever undertaken, says inadequate care translates into tens of thousands of deaths and unnecessary complications, posing "serious threats" to the public's health. The study was published in the journal Health Affairs.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
Carroll Hospital Center has begun what it calls an "aggressive" search for hospital partners, saying it's open to all options, including the possibility of merging with another institution. The 193-bed hospital has operated independently for its entire 53-year existence and is profitable, but CEO John Sernulka said changes in health care will put financial pressure on small hospitals like his in the near future. "Reimbursement will continue to tighten," Sernulka said. "There will be less and less dollars pumped into the health care system.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2014
Annie Monroe got in a quick workout at the FutureCare Irvington nursing home on a recent afternoon. But the 87-year-old great-grandmother doesn't live there. She was sent by a hospital in December for rehabilitation after suffering an infection. While the nursing home counts her as filling one of 40 rehab beds at the wooded campus outside of Catonsville, her home is in Baltimore. Monroe represents a trend in health care in Maryland, and across the country, to ensure that as much care as possible is administered outside of costly hospital wards.
NEWS
By Martin O'Malley | January 11, 2014
Beyond the political debates over the Affordable Care Act is a bipartisan consensus about the future of our nation's health care system. Across the political spectrum, officials and experts agree that we must shift from a near exclusive focus on treating people when they get sick to a balanced approach that also promotes health and wellness. Such a shift will both reduce costs for families and small businesses and keep many Americans from dying of preventable causes. Our health care system's heavy reliance on "fee-for-service financing" generates lackluster outcomes, despite ever-increasing costs.
NEWS
December 20, 2013
The Sun recently published the latest iteration of Vincent DeMarco's love songs to Obamacare, and Mr. DeMarco demonstrates once again that he has no sense of obligation to the truth ( "Don't forget the ACA's true purpose," Dec. 16). For example, Mr. DeMarco states that "working families are now guaranteed that health insurance will cover doctors' visits and prescriptions and preventive care. " What he doesn't say, however, is that many of the tens of thousands of Maryland policies that are being canceled by Obamacare already cover doctors' visits, prescriptions and preventive care.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | December 16, 2013
"Obamacare was sold on a trinity of lies. " That ornate phrase, more suitable for the Book of Revelations or perhaps the next installment of "Game of Thrones," comes from my National Review colleague Rich Lowry. But I like it. Most people know the first deception in the triumvirate of deceit: "If you like your health insurance you can keep it, period. " The second leg in the tripod of deception was "If you like your doctor, you can keep your doctor. " But the third plank in the triad of disinformation hasn't gotten much attention: Obamacare will save you, me and the country a lot of money.
NEWS
By Vincent DeMarco | December 16, 2013
As we wind down 2013, Marylanders are hearing a lot about health care  -  on the news, in the paper, maybe even over dinner or at the local coffee shop. With all the numbers and terms out there, and all the talk from politicians and pundits, it's important not to lose sight of the most important thing: people. The Affordable Care Act is about people getting quality care when they get sick. It's about helping keep them healthy so they don't get that way. It's about making health care more affordable for Marylanders. And it's about making sure, when accidents or illness strike, no one has to go bankrupt to get the care they need.
NEWS
By Knight Ridder News Service | March 12, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Americans are fatter, more stressed out and no likelier to get regular exercise than 10 years ago, warns a new poll that says the nation is descending into cholesterol hell.The national survey by Louis Harris and Associates comes as Hillary Rodham Clinton's White House task force seriously is considering making personal responsibility and preventive care building blocks of national health reform.Well, guess what, Mrs. Clinton? Most of us have health habits like your husband's.
HEALTH
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
A network of Catholic employers is temporarily exempt from the federal government's requirement to provide free birth control coverage for workers, a federal court has ruled. The ruling this week by an Oklahoma judge grants a preliminary injunction for some members of the Catholic Benefits Association, an organization of religious employers that owns an insurance company and is led by Archbishop William Lori of Baltimore. The CBA and other Catholic groups filed a class action lawsuit against the federal government in March, asking to be freed from the Affordable Care Act's requirement to provide contraceptive coverage without a co-pay.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2013
A state plan to tie medical spending to the growth of the economy is making hospital executives uneasy. Executives support the spirit of the plan proposed by the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, which seeks to reduce health spending by shifting patient care away from their facilities and toward more outpatient and preventive care. But they worry that its spending goals are too aggressive, and that they can't be attained in the time period the state has laid out. And they say it lacks necessary details on key elements, including how hospitals can be expected to limit spending increases to state economic growth.
NEWS
By Joshua M. Sharfstein, Laura Herrera, and Charles Milligan | September 27, 2012
By establishing a health benefit exchange and expanding Medicaid coverage, Maryland is on a path to extend access to affordable health care to hundreds of thousands of individuals, families and small businesses. For our progress to be sustainable, however, the growth in health care spending must be slowed and brought into balance. According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, health spending in 1999 averaged $3,993 per person in Maryland, about the national average. Over the next decade, however, Maryland's per capita spending rose 88 percent to $7,492 in 2009, outpacing national growth by more than $500 per person.
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