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Prevention Programs

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NEWS
February 7, 1997
Two Arnold organizations that created their own substance abuse prevention programs were awarded grants by Anne Arundel County Department of Health's Prevention Services.The Parent-Teen Network, which plans activities for teen-agers and promotes community group and school networks to help prevent drug problems, received $2,500.Since October, the organization has sponsored six workshops in conjunction with the Adult Dare Education Program at Severna Park Elementary School.Camp Blaze was awarded a $5,000 grant for instituting a parent training program that provides sessions on leadership, nurturing and substance abuse prevention through seminars, parent/child interactions and role-playing.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
The reputation that Nathan "Bodie" Barksdale gained as one of Baltimore's most notorious heroin dealers also made him a good outreach worker for Safe Streets, an innovative program that enlists former offenders to help mediate disputes before they erupt in gunfire. The fact that Barksdale had survived more than 20 gunshot wounds and once controlled lucrative drug territory in West Baltimore gave him credibility on the street. Then last week the supposedly reformed Barksdale was indicted again, accused of dealing drugs as a member of the Black Guerrilla Family gang.
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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 24, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Remember midnight basketball?Scornful Republicans who are taking over the House of Representatives do, and they are planning to reopen this year's angry debate over federal funding for crime-prevention measures in hopes of getting rid of midnight basketball and other so-called prevention programs.The House GOP's "Contract With America" calls for a $5 billion cut in prevention programs that were in cluded in this year's hard-won $30 billion crime bill.Republicans want to see fewer dollars for Democratic "social welfare programs" and more in flexible block grants "to the communities that have the highest crime rates," said Rep. Bill McCollum, a senior member of the House Judiciary Committee and one of three candidates running for House majority whip.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
The Baltimore man who claims to have inspired HBO's "The Wire" and was arrested on federal drug and gun charges last month had been a mediator for a program aimed at stamping out violence on the city's streets until recently. Nathan "Bodie" Barksdale worked for Safe Streets, a city Health Department program in which former criminals help rid the streets of the violent crime they once perpetuated, until being fired last month, the program's Mondawmin site director Delaino Johnson said.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2003
For the past 15 years, juvenile offenders in Baltimore County have seen firsthand the devastation caused by alcohol- and drug-related accidents by touring Maryland Shock Trauma Center at the end of a five-week class. Those involved in the tours said they have helped wayward teens get back on track. But now, the Baltimore County Health Department is eliminating the tours, for reasons that are not quite clear. Ellen R. Clayton, the county's deputy health officer, said the program was "not necessarily proving effective."
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1999
In America in the '90s it's practically a given: In addition to reading, writing and arithmetic, schools are expected to teach children about drugs.But how effective are school-based drug education and prevention programs? Should you enroll your child in one?According to Harold E. Shinitzky, a psychologist with the Johns Hopkins Hospital, school-based programs are definitely worthwhile -- but only if parents and school administrators have made the right choices."You've probably heard this before: For every dollar spent on drug treatment you save $12 of cost to society," says Shinitzky.
NEWS
November 3, 1991
The county's war on drugs has moved to Parole.In a move to better coordinate treatment and prevention programs, the Health Departmentmoved the nine-member Office of Drug and Alcohol Programs next to Open Door, a heavily used outpatient program in Parole Plaza.David W. Almy, the county's new drug czar, and his staff left theArundel Center to work more closely with treatment counselors.County Executive Robert R. Neall decided in May to place the office, formerly an independent agency in the executive branch, under the Health Department's authority.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 31, 1999
Money collected from substance-abuse offenders in court will be directed toward addicts who can't afford treatment, the Carroll County State's Attorney's Office says.Prosecutors routinely request donations at the conclusion of trials of those convicted of drug and alcohol abuse or drunken driving, said Jerry F. Barnes, Carroll state's attorney."The judges in Carroll County have been very cooperative in directing that donations be made to the substance-abuse fund," Barnes said.The money has been used for awareness and prevention programs.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 12, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The global AIDS epidemic is worsening faster than experts earlier believed, according to new figures released yesterday by the World Health Organization.WHO predicted in 1988 that there would be a cumulative total of 15 million to 20 million adults infected with human immunodeficiency virus, which causes AIDS, by the year 2000. But in the last four years, substantial increases in infections in sub-Saharan Africa and South and Southeast Asia have suggested that the 15 million to 20 million total may be reached by the mid- or late 1990s, the agency said in a report.
NEWS
August 16, 1994
Many opponents of the crime bill that was denied an up-or-down vote in the House of Representatives last week ridicule it for its crime prevention titles, especially so-called "midnight basketball." But what's wrong with a program that would offer youths in poor, crime-ridden neighborhoods recreational facilities? Or after-school cultural activities? Or job training? Or drug counseling?Many Republicans who voted against the crime bill (on a procedural motion) in an effort to kill it, say they're for law 'n' order, but not for "pork," which they inaccurately label such prevention programs.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley and state lawmakers for the first time dipped into a $100 million fund set aside to deal with the impact of the federal sequester, lessening the blow of automatic federal spending cuts on the state's poor and elderly. O'Malley announced Wednesday that a legislative committee approved his request to spend $9 million on programs that used to be paid for by the federal government, including meals for senior citizens and early childhood education for low-income children.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn | March 27, 2012
A female condom program was highly effective in preventing HIV infections, according to a new economic analysis by researchers in the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health . The analysis, published in the journal AIDS and Behavior , found the DC Females Condom program, a public-private partnership to provide and promote a type of female condom, prevent enough infections in one year to save more than $8 million in future medical care...
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By Aegis staff report | May 27, 2011
Harford County's Office of Drug Control Policy, based on the most recent state figures is successfully serving more clients than any similar local office in Maryland, the county government announced last week. As a result, Harford County Executive David R. Craig recently congratulated the staff of the Office of Drug Control Policy for its statewide recognition in substance abuse prevention programs. According to the county government, the State Alcohol and Drug Abuse Administration published its annual report for fiscal year 2010 (July 1, 2009-June 30, 3010)
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2010
Several hundred people gathered on Paul Laurence Dunbar High School's football field Sunday afternoon to protest state plans to build a $100 million, 230-bed detention facility in Baltimore for juveniles criminally charged as adults. The two-hour rally culminated in a candle-lit march to the proposed construction site, a quarter-mile away next to the Baltimore City Detention Center, where protesters — chanting "educate, don't incarcerate" — used bolt-cutters to strip away the chain link fence protecting the property.
NEWS
February 25, 2010
We agree with workplace researchers Kathleen M. McPhaul, Jane Lipscomb and Matthew London and George Myers of the Maryland Professional Employees Council (Readers respond, Feb. 22 and Feb. 23) that we must do all we can to prevent workplace violence wherever it occurs. This is why Maryland Occupational Safety and Health (MOSH), in conjunction with federal agencies, has been proactive in assessing risks at public agencies and assisting them in developing prevention programs. While we cannot discuss MOSH's ongoing investigation of the homicide that occurred on the grounds of the Cheltenham youth detention center, we are fully aware of the significant risk of job-related violence faced by health care and social service workers.
NEWS
By Robert S. Gold | August 6, 2009
Even as the debate over health care reform reaches a fever pitch, significant questions about the future of public health and medicine in our nation remain unanswered. From public options to universal access, proposals and plans to help Americans live longer and healthier lives are seemingly all on the table, and yet amid all these ideas, an absolutely necessary part of our public health future - prevention - seems to be lost in the shuffle. The simple act of changing our lifestyle for the better can dramatically improve our quality of life and lessen our health care expenses, and it's a renewed emphasis on prevention programs that will bring true reform to our health care system.
NEWS
February 25, 2010
We agree with workplace researchers Kathleen M. McPhaul, Jane Lipscomb and Matthew London and George Myers of the Maryland Professional Employees Council (Readers respond, Feb. 22 and Feb. 23) that we must do all we can to prevent workplace violence wherever it occurs. This is why Maryland Occupational Safety and Health (MOSH), in conjunction with federal agencies, has been proactive in assessing risks at public agencies and assisting them in developing prevention programs. While we cannot discuss MOSH's ongoing investigation of the homicide that occurred on the grounds of the Cheltenham youth detention center, we are fully aware of the significant risk of job-related violence faced by health care and social service workers.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | December 26, 2007
Maryland currently spends about 60 percent of the minimum recommended by the federal government on tobacco prevention programs - less than a tenth of what tobacco companies spend on marketing in the state, according to a new analysis by anti-smoking groups. Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggest the state spend $30.3 million on tobacco prevention, Maryland spends $18.4 million, according to the report from the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, American Heart Association, American Lung Association and American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | December 27, 2007
A state delegate said yesterday he will introduce legislation that would require Maryland to increase funding for tobacco prevention programs by 2012 to ensure the state meets federal recommendations. Del. Samuel I. Rosenberg, a Baltimore Democrat, said he requested that legislation be drafted in response to an article in The Sun yesterday about a report from anti-tobacco groups showing that Maryland currently spends $18.4 million on tobacco prevention programs - about 60 percent of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's recommended minimum of $30.3 million.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | December 26, 2007
Maryland currently spends about 60 percent of the minimum recommended by the federal government on tobacco prevention programs - less than a tenth of what tobacco companies spend on marketing in the state, according to a new analysis by anti-smoking groups. Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggest the state spend $30.3 million on tobacco prevention, Maryland spends $18.4 million, according to the report from the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, American Heart Association, American Lung Association and American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network.
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