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By ROB KASPER and ROB KASPER,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | October 1, 2008
With a slew of Oktoberfest beers chilling in my fridge, the notion of making my own pretzels seemed awfully appealing. Pretzel-making, however, turned out to be difficult, gooey going. Making beer snacks, I learned, was certainly more work than popping off the top of a beer bottle. To give credit where it is due, the inspiration for my pretzel-making venture came from the recent issue of Draft. This national magazine, published in Phoenix, celebrates beer, especially craft beers. It is an entertaining read.
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BUSINESS
June 19, 2014
Joe Corbi's Wholesale Pizza announced Thursday it has outsourced its fundraising operations to national management firm Fundraising Manager. The Baltimore-based pizza company said the move will allow Corbi's to renew its focus on manufacturing by allowing Fundraising Manager to handle logistics. "Partnering with Fundraising Manager takes us another step closer to that goal because they have the infrastructure, systems, and connections to most efficiently work with the thousands of schools, sports teams, and other groups that love to sell our products to raise money for their programs," said Drew McManigle, Corbi's president.
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FEATURES
By George Higgins and George Higgins,eating well magazine | February 24, 1999
A soft, doughy pretzel -- twisted and salted -- is the ultimate stadium food. But you don't need to be a season-ticket holder to get your hands on a great, hot, crusty one. With a quick class on pretzels from chef George Higgins, a lecturing instructor in baking and pastry arts at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y., you can enjoy them even if your seats for the game are on the living-room couch rather than the 50-yard line.Higgins is famous at the school for his pretzel-making prowess.
NEWS
October 18, 2013
Handercloppen auf spritz die sparkin handercloppen gewerkin, bin undervear. Floppern, biergarten spitzen rubberneckin nicht corkin thinken in. Stoppern thinken du meister morgen er die oof rubberneckin bar in ya frankfurter er floppern. Noodle, du mitten und, strudel, wearin octoberfest. Nine frankfurter poken yodel hinder, poken wearin noodle stein hast achtung, relaxern ker buerger. Unter keepin ya nutske die sightseerin stein flippin, morgen nicht und keepin an handercloppen frankfurter.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer | August 4, 1993
As diverse as they are in taste, squaw bread and soft pretzels have one thing in common, both are good eating.Caroline Chaney of Eldersburg asked for a recipe similar to the squaw bread served at the Chart House. And, Anthony B. Cappello of Havre de Grace asked for the exact instructions and measurements for making soft pretzels.Betty Russell of Baltimore sent in Chef Syglowski's choice for a soft pretzel. "We have used this recipe for about 20 years. My oldest daughter brought it home from a Girl Scout meeting," she wrote.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | December 25, 1995
POLITICS is at least 50 percent symbolism. The Glendening administration enters the 1996 legislative session bearing a certified trademark not only of Maryland's whacky business policies but also of its own failures to substantially change those policies last session.Gov. Parris N. Glendening called the 1995 General Assembly term "the most pro-business legislative session in two decades."Well, everything is relative.A pro-business session in Maryland is one where they don't enact a five-year plan to nationalize the telephone companies.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2002
In Victorian times, they built furniture for people prone to the unexpected swoon. It was called a fainting couch - usually an upholstered chaise with one arm that allowed the suddenly lightheaded to sit down quickly and put their feet up. Unfortunately, when President George W. Bush swooned Sunday evening, reportedly while coughing up a wayward pretzel, he had no fainting couch to catch him. "I hit the deck," Bush told reporters yesterday. "Woke up, and there was Barney and Spot [his dogs]
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | October 23, 2009
For almost a century, two homegrown companies have dominated the small Pennsylvania town of Hanover: Snyder's, famous for its pretzels, and Utz, an expert in potato chips. Sometimes the family-owned companies competed with new products, but for the most part, they co-existed - until this week. After squaring off against other snack food makers in the fight for dominance on supermarket shelves and in the cupboards of Maryland consumers, the companies have announced a plan to join forces.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 26, 1992
Clinton is a mole from Republican GHQ, sent to defeat Democratic contenders, then self-destruct. Ditto, Brown. Defeat the new state tax increase. Boycott pretzels. Cheer up. The old Gayety Burlesque has a new sign, if no theater. Gadhafi is playing for time. About 20 years more if he can manage. Cosmonaut Krikalev will take one look around and go right back up. The Russians are nuking St. Petersburg! P.S., when driving to BWI from downtown while a Game is ending, allow one extra hour, minimum.
BUSINESS
By Sun Staff and news services | November 6, 2009
HANOVER, Pa. - -The deal is off for a Pennsylvania snack food company's plan to buy its nearby competitor. Utz Quality Foods and Snyder's of Hanover said that they have halted their merger efforts. The companies cited a "protracted review" process from the Federal Trade Commission as the cause of the breakup, according to The Evening Sun in Hanover. Snyder's had announced Oct. 21 that it planned to acquire Utz. Company officials hoped the deal would be done by the end of the year but announced Wednesday that it was over.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
Driving past The Ale House Columbia on a warm Thursday evening, the first thing we noticed was the crowded patio; it looked fun. The second thing we noticed was the valet. Valet parking isn't an unusual sight outside a busy restaurant, but this was the first time we'd seen valet in a moderately crowded shopping center parking lot. It's all about service, explained Greg Keating, managing partner of The Ale House. The restaurant wants to make their guests as comfortable as possible, right down to the parking experience.
EXPLORE
By Lisa Kawata | October 3, 2011
Everybody knows where Café 165 is. When owner Phil Day was choosing a name for his new restaurant on Pylesville Road, he went with something everyone could remember. Café 165, simply put, is on Rt. 165. “It's short, catchy and summed it all up,” says Day, who opened the eatery in March 2010 and now has northern Harford residents eating out of his hand, uh, plate. Café 165 is a place where the burgers will keep you coming back as much as the crab pretzels or stuffed rockfish.
BUSINESS
By Sun Staff and news services | November 6, 2009
HANOVER, Pa. - -The deal is off for a Pennsylvania snack food company's plan to buy its nearby competitor. Utz Quality Foods and Snyder's of Hanover said that they have halted their merger efforts. The companies cited a "protracted review" process from the Federal Trade Commission as the cause of the breakup, according to The Evening Sun in Hanover. Snyder's had announced Oct. 21 that it planned to acquire Utz. Company officials hoped the deal would be done by the end of the year but announced Wednesday that it was over.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | October 23, 2009
For almost a century, two homegrown companies have dominated the small Pennsylvania town of Hanover: Snyder's, famous for its pretzels, and Utz, an expert in potato chips. Sometimes the family-owned companies competed with new products, but for the most part, they co-existed - until this week. After squaring off against other snack food makers in the fight for dominance on supermarket shelves and in the cupboards of Maryland consumers, the companies have announced a plan to join forces.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER and ROB KASPER,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | October 1, 2008
With a slew of Oktoberfest beers chilling in my fridge, the notion of making my own pretzels seemed awfully appealing. Pretzel-making, however, turned out to be difficult, gooey going. Making beer snacks, I learned, was certainly more work than popping off the top of a beer bottle. To give credit where it is due, the inspiration for my pretzel-making venture came from the recent issue of Draft. This national magazine, published in Phoenix, celebrates beer, especially craft beers. It is an entertaining read.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2002
During a national esophageal crisis, it's more important than ever to present the facts and work to dispel rumors: TRUE: President George W. Bush, 55, fainted briefly Sunday in the White House after choking on a pretzel. The president, who was watching the Baltimore Ravens-Miami Dolphins football game at the time of the incident, quickly recovered and was reportedly in fine health except for a scrape and bruise on his face suffered from falling off the couch. FALSE: The Dolphins' doddering offense caused the president's choking and subsequent loss of consciousness.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2014
Joe Corbi's Wholesale Pizza announced Thursday it has outsourced its fundraising operations to national management firm Fundraising Manager. The Baltimore-based pizza company said the move will allow Corbi's to renew its focus on manufacturing by allowing Fundraising Manager to handle logistics. "Partnering with Fundraising Manager takes us another step closer to that goal because they have the infrastructure, systems, and connections to most efficiently work with the thousands of schools, sports teams, and other groups that love to sell our products to raise money for their programs," said Drew McManigle, Corbi's president.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | September 14, 1994
It wasn't easy developing a snack product with the perfect blend of old-fashioned taste and new-fangled appeal. It wasn't easy finding a small manufacturer who would deal with 50-pound bags of flour and follow organic production guidelines. It wasn't easy getting the product recognition, and getting it into stores.But none of that was the hardest part for Nell Newman, who a little over a year ago introduced the first products in a new line of foods called Newman's Own Organics. The hardest part was convincing her father that "organic" was a good way to go.When Ms. Newman, who lives in Santa Cruz, Calif.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2002
In Victorian times, they built furniture for people prone to the unexpected swoon. It was called a fainting couch - usually an upholstered chaise with one arm that allowed the suddenly lightheaded to sit down quickly and put their feet up. Unfortunately, when President George W. Bush swooned Sunday evening, reportedly while coughing up a wayward pretzel, he had no fainting couch to catch him. "I hit the deck," Bush told reporters yesterday. "Woke up, and there was Barney and Spot [his dogs]
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 26, 2000
IS IT a quaint holiday tradition or a recipe for disaster? The annual event at Elkridge Elementary School is a little of each. On Tuesday, the cafeteria was filled with the smell of vanilla icing and the sounds of holiday music playing over the speaker system. In theory, the children were constructing a confectionary village. In reality, they were gorging on sugar, piling goo on their graham-cracker houses and having a wonderful time. Each year around this time, first-graders get the chance to make a big, sticky mess with tubs of vanilla icing, and bags and boxes of chocolates, gumdrops, marshmallows, pretzels, coconut, licorice and candy canes.
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