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By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | December 5, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer's budget ax swung closer to home this week as 11 Executive Department positions were eliminated, including four press office jobs that are currently filled.The grim pre-Christmas news claimed the jobs of one of three assistant press secretaries to the governor as well as that of an administrative assistant who has worked in the press office under six press secretaries and four governors over a 14-year span.Frank Traynor, Mr. Schaefer's press secretary since July, said he was trying to run the office the way he would a profit-making business: more efficiently and economically.
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NEWS
By David Driver | June 22, 2014
After graduating from the University of Delaware, Michael Kammarman and his twin brother, David, spent part of the next two years backpacking around the world. The brothers, who played soccer at Laurel High and graduated in the Class of 1989, spent time in Europe, the Middle East and the South Pacific, setting foot in 35 different countries. Nearly 20 years later Michael Kammarman, a product of the Laurel Boys and Girls Club soccer program, is still getting a lot of stamps in his passport.
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NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | November 23, 1990
Despite a cost-saving hiring freeze imposed on thousands of vacant state jobs, Gov. William Donald Schaefer has hired a new $50,000-a-year speechwriter to succeed one who left his press office shortly after the September primary election.Paige Boinest, who most recently worked as Maryland bureau chief for United Press International, will begin her new job Monday, according to Louise Hayman, the governor's deputy press secretary.Linda Dove, Schaefer's former speechwriter, left her position in September for a job with a private company in Washington.
NEWS
By Lucas High, Capital News Service | March 14, 2013
Vice President Joe Biden's press secretary apologized to a Capital News Service reporter and the University of Maryland's Philip Merrill College of Journalism on Wednesday after a press office staffer demanded the reporter delete photos taken at an event in Rockville. The reporter, a credentialed member of the press who is a student at the University of Maryland, College Park, was covering a domestic violence event featuring Biden, Attorney General Eric Holder and U.S. Sen. Ben Cardin.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1997
In Montgomery County, there's no escaping Doug Duncan.Turn on the TV, and you'll see a beaming county executive on his own cable shows.Duncan with voters.Duncan with visitors.Duncan with volunteers.Sign on your computer and read nearly three years' worth of Duncan pronouncements.See photos of him signing documents.Send him e-mail.Open your mailbox and learn via newsletter, brochure or flier what your taxes are buying, courtesy of Douglas M. Duncan."There's press because things are getting done," Duncan said.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2005
The Sun has not been hindered by an Ehrlich administration order barring state employees from talking to a reporter and columnist for the paper, attorneys for the governor argued in papers filed in federal court this week. The paper has been able to gather and disseminate news much as before, they said. The Sun filed a federal lawsuit last month after the press office of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. issued an order barring state employees from speaking with State House bureau chief David Nitkin or columnist Michael Olesker.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2001
Martha Joynt Kumar moves confidently through the White House press office and toward the West Wing, a press pass swinging from a chain around her neck. She looks like a reporter, in her wrinkle-resistant knits and smart, black flats. She kibitzes like the reporters. To some extent, she acts like a reporter, buttonholing White House officials for interviews. Even former White House press secretary Marlin Fitzwater assumed she was a reporter, although he had never seen a member of the Fourth Estate arrive in a Jaguar.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky | October 2, 1991
Five years ago, back when Maryland's economic forecasters saw only sunshine, Gov. Harry R. Hughes made do with a staff of 74. Today, amid a budget hurricane that's about to toss more than 1,700 state employees out of work, Gov. William Donald Schaefer presides over an executive staff that's swollen to 119.And none is being laid off.How did the governor's office escape the storm? Frank Traynor, the governor's press secretary, would not answer directly."All I know is that these cuts affected agencies across the board," Mr. Traynor said.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | July 31, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- It was all just a big misunderstanding, Gov. William Donald Schaefer said yesterday as he untied the gag he had placed on state government spokesmen four weeks ago."A big to-do about nothing," the governor declared, admitting he has been irritated by newspaper and broadcast stories about the gag order and editorials criticizing it.It's not what he meant at all.He just wanted state agencies to coordinate what they say to the press and the public.He just wanted the teeniest bit of notice before some reporter asked him a question about something he otherwise would know nothing about.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
Some of the most prominent journalists' organizations in America filed a joint brief this week supporting The Sun in a case they see as important in buttressing First Amendment rights of reporters and the public. The Sun filed a federal lawsuit last month after Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s press office issued an order banning state employees from speaking with State House bureau chief David Nitkin or columnist Michael Olesker. The attorney general's office, representing Ehrlich, filed a motion to dismiss the suit late last month, and The Sun in turn has filed a motion for a preliminary injunction to have the ban lifted.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2005
The Sun has not been hindered by an Ehrlich administration order barring state employees from talking to a reporter and columnist for the paper, attorneys for the governor argued in papers filed in federal court this week. The paper has been able to gather and disseminate news much as before, they said. The Sun filed a federal lawsuit last month after the press office of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. issued an order barring state employees from speaking with State House bureau chief David Nitkin or columnist Michael Olesker.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
Some of the most prominent journalists' organizations in America filed a joint brief this week supporting The Sun in a case they see as important in buttressing First Amendment rights of reporters and the public. The Sun filed a federal lawsuit last month after Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s press office issued an order banning state employees from speaking with State House bureau chief David Nitkin or columnist Michael Olesker. The attorney general's office, representing Ehrlich, filed a motion to dismiss the suit late last month, and The Sun in turn has filed a motion for a preliminary injunction to have the ban lifted.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2004
The Ehrlich administration announced yesterday it will evict the Maryland press corps from its long-held offices in the basement of the State House by the middle of next month, saying that the space is needed by gubernatorial staff members during renovations. The space will be unavailable to the press for about three years - beyond the end of the current term of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., who is expected to seek re-election in 2006. Then, reporters would share a single room in the basement called "the bullpen" that is currently used by journalists from smaller newspapers.
NEWS
May 22, 2003
Police chief dismayed by Jessamy's jabs The Sun's editorial "Enough is enough" (May 16) was absolutely accurate: The Police Department and the state's attorney's office do need to work in cooperation to fight crime in this city. This is precisely the reason that I met with Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy after only two days in my position as police commissioner. Recognizing that the relationship between the heads of the two agencies has been less than amicable in the past, I pledged my commitment and support to work with the state's attorney, toward what I believed was our mutual goal of reducing crime and improving public safety.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2001
Martha Joynt Kumar moves confidently through the White House press office and toward the West Wing, a press pass swinging from a chain around her neck. She looks like a reporter, in her wrinkle-resistant knits and smart, black flats. She kibitzes like the reporters. To some extent, she acts like a reporter, buttonholing White House officials for interviews. Even former White House press secretary Marlin Fitzwater assumed she was a reporter, although he had never seen a member of the Fourth Estate arrive in a Jaguar.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | February 29, 2000
Charles Read Madary Sr., a decorated Army officer who briefed war correspondents on some of history's momentous events, working side by side with Dwight D. Eisenhower, Ernie Pyle and Ernest Hemingway, died Wednesday of a heart attack at his Eastern Shore farm. He was 91. As a press officer for Eisenhower's European command during World War II, Mr. Madary was a liaison between the military and the press for historic moments such as D-Day, the liberation of the concentration camp at Bergen-Belsen, the German surrender at Rheims and the Nuremberg war crimes trial.
NEWS
May 22, 2003
Police chief dismayed by Jessamy's jabs The Sun's editorial "Enough is enough" (May 16) was absolutely accurate: The Police Department and the state's attorney's office do need to work in cooperation to fight crime in this city. This is precisely the reason that I met with Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy after only two days in my position as police commissioner. Recognizing that the relationship between the heads of the two agencies has been less than amicable in the past, I pledged my commitment and support to work with the state's attorney, toward what I believed was our mutual goal of reducing crime and improving public safety.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2004
The Ehrlich administration announced yesterday it will evict the Maryland press corps from its long-held offices in the basement of the State House by the middle of next month, saying that the space is needed by gubernatorial staff members during renovations. The space will be unavailable to the press for about three years - beyond the end of the current term of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., who is expected to seek re-election in 2006. Then, reporters would share a single room in the basement called "the bullpen" that is currently used by journalists from smaller newspapers.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1997
In Montgomery County, there's no escaping Doug Duncan.Turn on the TV, and you'll see a beaming county executive on his own cable shows.Duncan with voters.Duncan with visitors.Duncan with volunteers.Sign on your computer and read nearly three years' worth of Duncan pronouncements.See photos of him signing documents.Send him e-mail.Open your mailbox and learn via newsletter, brochure or flier what your taxes are buying, courtesy of Douglas M. Duncan."There's press because things are getting done," Duncan said.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1996
The phones are jangling; the fax won't go through to the Washington television stations; the Baltimore stations want an interview with the police spokesman, who will be gone in an hour; other reporters continue to pore over incident reports."
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