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By Laura Vozzella | June 22, 2011
This may be Charm City, but the PR outfit promoting Prince Edward's visit wasn't sure the Baltimore press corps had the polish to cover royalty. So IMRE took it upon itself to play Henry Higgins to newsroom Eliza Doolittles. "Royal Protocol: The general rule is that on first meeting the salutation is 'Your Royal Highness' and thereafter 'Sir,'" reporters were instructed via email. (I'm wondering if Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's office sent the prince a similar primer, with a "Don't call me 'Stephanie '" advisory.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 27, 2013
As President Obama tries to enjoy his Christmas vacation in Hawaii (the land of his birth, as recognized by most Americans except the diehard fringe still casting him as a foreigner), he has a lot to reflect on. In his last White House press conference before departing, he exchanged tidings of good cheer with reporters. But he was also peppered with as many reminders of how badly things turned out for him in the past year. It fell to the toughest but fairest reporter in the room, ABC News' Jonathan Karl, to confront him with the bark off: "You may not want to call it the worst year of your presidency, but it's clearly been a tough year.
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NEWS
By Jeff Cohen | July 19, 1998
For years, conservatives have painted a picture of the Washington press corps as a group of liberal crusaders bent on bashing corporations, bloating government and socializing health care.This caricature is utterly deflated by a new survey of journalists. It turns out that on a wide range of economic issues, Washington journalists are more conservative - not more liberal - than the general public.Take the charge that journalists are anti-business. The recent survey asked them a simple question: Do "a few large companies" have "too much power"?
ENTERTAINMENT
Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
Quentin Tarantino, Hollywood's reigning enfant terrible, seems to have some fans in the motion picture academy -- and in the pressroom. Tarantino's win, his second (he also won for "Pulp Fiction"), was a bit of a surprise, as it bested pre-Oscar favorites "Amour" and "Zero Dark Thirty. " But his win in the Original Screenplay category suggests the academy is becoming fond of Tarantino's brand of outrageousness. And the backstage pressroom's reaction -- a collective gasp followed by some heartfelt applause -- suggests cinema scribes feel likewise.
NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 5, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Confession time. After all that press harping about congressional perquisites, it's only fair to point out that Capitol Hill provides members of the news media with a few taxpayer-financed benefits of their own.That, at least, is the sentiment shared by many lawmakers, 16 of whom have sent a letter to the House Administration Committee requesting a comprehensive list of benefits enjoyed by Washington's press corps."
ENTERTAINMENT
Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
Quentin Tarantino, Hollywood's reigning enfant terrible, seems to have some fans in the motion picture academy -- and in the pressroom. Tarantino's win, his second (he also won for "Pulp Fiction"), was a bit of a surprise, as it bested pre-Oscar favorites "Amour" and "Zero Dark Thirty. " But his win in the Original Screenplay category suggests the academy is becoming fond of Tarantino's brand of outrageousness. And the backstage pressroom's reaction -- a collective gasp followed by some heartfelt applause -- suggests cinema scribes feel likewise.
FEATURES
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2000
Should President-elect George W. Bush plunge into his inaugural address with a soulful "My fetish Emergicams" or end with a garrulous "Gob blech you," he will find little accommodation from his friends in the press corps. Big surprise, eh? The voluble governor, who occasionally gallops roughhog over the English language - calling Greeks "Grecians," warning of the danger of "tacular" nuclear weapons and asking that really important question, "Is our children learning?" - will be quoted word-for-word by scribes in the print media, who generally express a high-minded disinclination to give the poor man a break.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | March 31, 2002
HAVE YOU EVER wondered how professional journalists cover an international sporting event? Too bad, because I'm going to tell you. In February I spent three weeks at the Winter Olympics in Utah ("Where the Party Never Stops Until 8:30 p.m."). I was part of the press corps swarming around in thermal underwear, asking penetrating questions such as: (1) Who won this event? (2) How can you tell? (3) What is this event called again? As you can see, the Olympic press corps does not always have a solid grasp on the events it's covering.
TOPIC
By Jeff Cohen | February 7, 1999
THE NATIONAL press corps, inflamed by President Clinton's personal failings, has howled like a wolf pack at the White House for more than a year.Things were a bit different during the Reagan era.In her new book, "Reporting Live," former CBS White House correspondent Lesley Stahl writes that she and other reporters suspected that Reagan was "sinking into senility" years before he left office. She writes that White House aides "covered up his condition" -- and journalists chose not to pursue it.Stahl describes a particularly unsettling encounter with Reagan in the summer of 1986: her "final meeting" with the president, typically a chance to ask a few parting questions for a "going-away story."
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1995
The reporters showed up even earlier than the faithful, some arriving at Camden Yards as early as 5 a.m.When the pope comes to town, it's show up early or don't get in.An estimated 600 to 1,000 journalists -- officials lost count -- started flowing into town on Thursday, setting up mini-offices and computer stations at the papal media center in Columbus Center on Pratt Street.They came from small religious publications and cable stations, major networks and newspapers, and from the Vatican press corps, an international group of journalists based in Rome.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2011
I honestly don't know if I have the emotional energy for this post today. I fought this battle in 2009 when the White House went to war with Fox, and I have the scars to prove it. I am so tired of standing up for journalistic principles in the middle of ideological battlefields and getting hammered from partisans on both sides that some days I think I'm crazy to do it. But either you believe in these journalistic and ethical principles or...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | June 22, 2011
This may be Charm City, but the PR outfit promoting Prince Edward's visit wasn't sure the Baltimore press corps had the polish to cover royalty. So IMRE took it upon itself to play Henry Higgins to newsroom Eliza Doolittles. "Royal Protocol: The general rule is that on first meeting the salutation is 'Your Royal Highness' and thereafter 'Sir,'" reporters were instructed via email. (I'm wondering if Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's office sent the prince a similar primer, with a "Don't call me 'Stephanie '" advisory.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | February 17, 2006
WASHINGTON -- White House reporters pounced on White House press secretary Scott McClellan like jackals circling a wounded antelope, teeth bared. "Scott, do you think that the shooting accident involving the vice president on Saturday should have been disclosed to the public on Saturday?" "Isn't there a public disclosure requirement that should have kicked in immediately?" "But let's just be clear here. The vice president of the United States accidentally shoots a man and he feels that it's appropriate for a ranch owner who witnessed this to tell the local ... newspaper, and not the White House press corps at large, or notify the public in a national way?"
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | January 31, 2006
SANA, YEMEN -- A lot of people were alarmed to see that Palestinians gave the terrorist Hamas organization an upset victory last week over the reputedly corrupt Fatah in parliament elections. But in this part of the world, any change of power through ballots instead of bullets is a good day. The big news just happened to find me also in the Middle East, but at the other end of the Arabian peninsula, trying to spread a little more democracy through freedom of the press, particularly to some courageous journalists in terrorism-tainted Yemen.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2004
If you read a news analysis in the The New York Times the morning after the first presidential debates four years ago, you learned that Al Gore was "the man who loves to show off how much he knows" while George W. Bush was "more eager to exchange good wishes." But patrons of The Washington Post discovered instead that Bush "took some punches and gave some back in return," while Gore "treated his opponent with relentless courtesy and occasional humor." Did Gore's and Bush's remarks reveal "pretty ideological" divisions, as Fox News Channel analyst Bill Kristol asserted just a few minutes at the close of the debate?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 4, 2004
It's an awful place, really, a dusty ground-floor suite of offices next to a noisy print shop. Beat-up desks are crammed together with no pretense of privacy, and the fluorescent lights are stark and depressing. But for 90 days each year, when the General Assembly session begins in Annapolis, the press offices in the State House hum with life, as reporters try, sometimes successfully, to make sense of the legislative maneuvers taking place all around them. The conditions could be more elegant, but a reporter could not ask for a more convenient place to plug in a computer.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | July 25, 1993
The time has come for unbiased observers such as myself to make a fair and objective assessment of the first roughly 187 days of the failed Clinton administration.I would say it did pretty well until the inauguration. There had been great excitement as "The Man From Hope Via Oxford And Of Course Yale Law School" came to Washington, bringing with him a new vision for America and numerous 18-point programs and a cat.He also brought a close-knit, battle-hardened staff of smart, tough, fiercely dedicated, loyal, savvy, gung-ho junior-high-school students, who immediately set about the task of transforming the federal government from a bloated, money-hemorrhaging bureaucracy into a bloated, money-hemorrhaging bureaucracy in which they had reserved parking spaces.
NEWS
March 22, 1993
As of this writing, President Clinton has yet to hold a full-fledged White House press conference.By this time in 1989, George Bush had held three presidential press conferences; by this time in 1981, Ronald Reagan had held two meetings with the press; by this time in 1977, Jimmy Carter had held four press conferences. Even Richard Nixon, never comfortable with journalists, had held one formal meeting with the press at this stage of his presidency in 1969. And John Kennedy, who began the practice of live, televised presidential press conferences, had held seven.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 30, 2003
STANDING IN A room of Jeannier's Restaurant just off the Johns Hopkins University campus, Bob Somerby gave his take on that "l.b." thing - liberal bias in the media. Who the dickens, you may wonder, is Bob Somerby? The brief bio on his Web site says he has had articles appear occasionally in The Sun. He was also a fifth-grade teacher in Baltimore public schools, which means he must be one of the bravest souls around. He puts out an online publication called The Daily Howler, which tells folks what varmints we news media types really are. Somerby also does stand-up comedy about political issues.
NEWS
October 24, 2002
BALTIMORE COUNTY is home to candidates in two of the three hotly contested Maryland races that are drawing national attention. That means county voters in several polling places will probably encounter a gaggle of reporters and camera crews on the scene to capture the moment when the candidates cast their ballots. Recording such events does not make for the world's greatest journalism. But it supplies pictures and a few paragraphs of grist for early edition newspapers and midday television broadcasts.
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