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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 23, 2000
LONDON -- She's a newsreader who doesn't miss a word, launch an ego trip or hold out for cash. Makeup, hair and wardrobe are never a problem. And she's on the job 24 hours a day. She's Ananova, the green-haired, green-eyed, ruby-lipped "cyber-babe" newscaster, the virtual personality and Internet star created as the face and voice of Britain's Press Association news service. Since her April launch, she has been a worldwide hit, dispensing news to 50,000 "unique users" who daily hit www.ananova.
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NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 20, 2014
For the third consecutive year, The Aegis was honored as Newspaper of the Year among the state's largest circulation non-daily papers by the Maryland, Delaware, D.C. Press Association during the organization's annual awards luncheon Friday. Aegis staff members received 10 first place and 15 second place individual reporting, writing, photography and multimedia awards in the competition among non-daily papers whose circulation exceeds 20,000. The Newspaper of the Year Award is determined under a system that awards three points for first place individual award and two points for second.
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NEWS
November 25, 1990
Bob Chance, a veteran environmental science teacher in Harford County and former Bel Air commissioner, has been selected by the governor for a four-year appointment to the Newsprint Recycling Board.Chance's recognition acknowledges his 25 years of dedication to environmental education about solid waste.As the founder of Susquehannock, the nation's oldest continuous recycling center, Chance is aware of the potential benefits of increased recycling in Maryland.The board will oversee the implementation of recycled fiber by newspaper publishers as required by state law.The group is chaired by Theodore Venetorilis of the Maryland, Delaware, D.C. Press Association.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
The Baltimore Sun was named Newspaper of the Year - and its Darkroom blog was recognized as the best among websites - by the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Press Association on Friday. The Sun has been chosen Newspaper of the Year eight times in the past nine years. The Washington Post won in 2008. The Sun won 50 first- or second-place awards in the annual editorial contest of daily papers with a circulation of 75,000 or more; the Post won 22; The News Journal, based in Wilmington, Del., won 14. Fourteen of the Sun's 25 first-place awards were also considered Best in Show, meaning they were superior to first-place winners from all other circulation categories.
NEWS
January 23, 2005
2 school publications win awards from press association Two local school publications were recognized for excellence in the Maryland Scholastic Press Association's 2004 publications contest. Annapolis High School's literary magazine, Perception, advisor Leslie Gershon and the staff won an award in the first-place category. Wanda Trimnal, yearbook advisor, and the staff for Arundel High School's yearbook, Panorama, won an award in the third-place category. The Maryland Scholastic Press Association is a nonprofit association headquartered at the Philip Merrill College of Journalism at the University of Maryland, College Park.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1997
Acting to strengthen a new law that made felony juvenile hearings public, a Court of Appeals committee is expected to recommend this week that all Maryland courts post notice of open cases with the names and charges of all minors facing felonies.The Court of Appeals Rules Committee is expected to meet and formally make its recommendation to the full court Friday."We'll be preparing a rule that clarifies that calendar assignments and court assignments are not confidential," Judge Joseph F. Murphy Jr., chairman of the committee, said yesterday.
TOPIC
By David R. Rosenthal and David R. Rosenthal,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2003
Chalk it up to bureaucratic ineptness or old-fashioned stonewalling. Whatever the reason, Marylanders have a hard time prying the most mundane information from the Motor Vehicle Administration, State Lottery Commission and other state agencies, a new study shows. According to results released last week by the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Press Association, which sought public documents from the agencies, more than a third of the requests were stymied. And the surveyors were posing as regular citizens.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 30, 2001
LONDON - After 29 years of uncertainty over his role in one of the most searing incidents in the modern history of Northern Ireland, the province's education minister, Martin McGuinness, is poised to disclose publicly that he was the Irish Republican Army's second in command in Londonderry on "Bloody Sunday," according to British and Irish news reports. But he is expected to label as "rubbish and a lie" allegations made by a security services agent that he fired the shot that triggered the mayhem on the streets of Londonderry on Jan. 30, 1972, which came to be known as "Bloody Sunday."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Johnson and Steve Johnson,Chicago Tribune | December 21, 2003
It is OK, I suppose, to watch the Golden Globe Awards next month and pretend along with everyone else that they are important and / or interesting. But it's better to understand what the Globes really are: a fiction that's convenient for everybody, stars, studios and certainly the members of the secretive Hollywood Foreign Press Association who determine the awards and the NBC Television Network that has helped inflate their presence in popular culture....
NEWS
By From staff reports | January 15, 1997
TOWSON -- The owner of a controversial after-hours club faces charges for alleged alcohol violations and disorderly conduct, though he has been acquitted of alcohol violations in one District Court case and found guilty of similar charges in another case.District Judge Nancy B. Shuger scheduled five remaining cases against John A. Giorgilli, 30, owner of Club 101 in the 8800 block of Orchard Tree Lane, for Friday.Giorgilli was fined $50 Friday for letting patrons consume alcohol pTC between 2 a.m. and 6 a.m. Sept.
NEWS
May 21, 2013
The Laurel Leader won six awards, including a first-place award for photography, in the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Press Association's 2012 editorial contest. The awards were for newspapers in Division D, non-dailies with a circulation more than 20,000, and were announced at the annual MDDC luncheon Friday, May 17. The newspaper's 2012 awards include: • First place Feature Photo for Phil Grout's cover photo "Flip Dip," of Laurel Municipal Pool lifeguard Bubba Mullins and his dog, Rusty, playing at Doggy Dip Day at the pool.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 21, 2013
A series of articles and editorials written by members of The Aegis staff about the alarming rise in traffic deaths in Harford County last year - and how law enforcement rushed to address the situation - has been named the best public service journalism in the region last year. The Best in Show for Public Service was one of nearly three dozen honors earned by the editorial, photography and sports staffs of The Aegis and The Record at the annual Maryland Delaware D.C. Press Association awards luncheon held near BWI Marshall Airport on Friday.
EXPLORE
April 24, 2012
The Baltimore Messenger won 10 awards in the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Press Asociation's 2012 editorial contest. Winners were announced April 20. Kathleen Reynolds won first place for Sports Page Design, for a preview of the boys lacrosse season. Editor Larry Perl won four first-place awards, for Feature Story (Non-Profile), about a family-run lemonade stand; Religion Reporting, for a story about a priest's ordination; Business Reporting, for a story about Mill No. 1, a planned multi-use development in Hampden; and Local Government Reporting, for a story about Oakenshawe's zoning battle against a nearby bar. Perl also won two second-place awards, for Weather/Natural Disasters Reporting, about the aftermath of Hurricane Irene; and Headline Writing, for a story about a lack of air-conditioning at the Belvedere Towers apartment building.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | April 23, 2012
During his more than 60 years in the news business, Timonium resident Lou Panos crossed paths with people from legendary Baltimore scribeH.L. Mencken to the Kennedy brothers - as in RFK and JFK. Along the way, Panos, 86, who was inducted last week into the Maryland/Delaware/DC Press Association's Hall of Fame, cranked out articles, editorials and columns for the Associated Press for 20 years and later for the Baltimore Sun and the Patuxent Publishing...
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | February 15, 2012
Just hours after Baltimore police issued a directive telling its 3,100 officers that they can't arrest or seize cameras from people merely for photographing or videotaping them, officers were caught on tape seemingly doing just that. On Tuesday, the National Press Photographers Association sent a letter to Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III voicing its concern. The new video showed officers threatening to arrest a man near Cross Street Market in Federal Hill for taping an arrest.
FEATURES
By Rachel Abramowitz and Rachel Abramowitz,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 14, 2007
From the cover Globes: all questions, no answers So the 82 voting members of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association have punted. They're either unable or unwilling to designate any sort of Oscar frontrunner and so have nominated as many as 12 films for either best drama or comedy, for the 65th annual Golden Globe Awards. Sprinkling their gold dust everywhere, the group handed out nominations for dramas, seven in all, for films such as Atonement, the World War II tale of love thwarted by a child's overactive imagination, to Ridley Scott's ode to drug lords, American Gangster, to the Coen brothers' violent modern-day Western No Country for Old Men. And there were the five nominees in the musical or comedy category, including Sweeney Todd, based on the Sondheim musical about a barbarous barber; Hairspray, based on the John Waters film and Broadway play; the unplanned pregnancy comedy, Juno - and on and on. Some of the films, like Across the Universe and Charlie Wilson's War, haven't set the critics afire, but what does that matter, when Julia Roberts and Tom Hanks can be nominated and invited to the party?
NEWS
July 24, 1995
Percy Humphrey, 90, who played trumpet regularly at the famed Preservation Hall in New Orleans until March and was the city's oldest active jazz musician, died Saturday of heart problems.The peak of his career came in the 1940s and 1950s, when he led the Eureka Brass Band, the premier marching band for parades and funerals."I loved hearing that trumpet soar on top of it," said jazz historian Dick Allen, who met Mr. Humphrey in 1946. "Percy never relied on cheap vaudeville tricks. . . . Percy always came up with something original."
FEATURES
By John Horn and John Horn,Los Angeles Times | December 29, 2006
HOLLYWOOD -- It's one of the most reliable bellwethers of the Academy Award for best picture. The Golden Globes? Hardly. The National Board of Review of Motion Pictures? Not a chance. Perhaps the Screen Actors Guild ensemble award? Wrong again. If you are really interested in who has their fingers on the pulse of Oscar voters, you need to travel to north Texas and canvass the 35 members of the Dallas-Fort Worth Film Critics Association. In the past five years, they correctly have foretold the best picture winner four times - missing only Crash, a movie everybody underestimated.
FEATURES
By John Horn and John Horn,Los Angeles Times | December 29, 2006
HOLLYWOOD -- It's one of the most reliable bellwethers of the Academy Award for best picture. The Golden Globes? Hardly. The National Board of Review of Motion Pictures? Not a chance. Perhaps the Screen Actors Guild ensemble award? Wrong again. If you are really interested in who has their fingers on the pulse of Oscar voters, you need to travel to north Texas and canvass the 35 members of the Dallas-Fort Worth Film Critics Association. In the past five years, they correctly have foretold the best picture winner four times - missing only Crash, a movie everybody underestimated.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | April 29, 2006
The two leading Democratic candidates for governor were in the same room at the same time yesterday, but they made clear they are running very different races. At a candidates forum sponsored by the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Press Association in Annapolis, Mayor Martin O'Malley, who has consistently led in the polls, promoted the success of Baltimore under his watch and trained his sights on Republican Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., who he said has left the state adrift. About his fellow Democrat, Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan, he said he wouldn't utter an unkind word.
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