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By Louis Sahagun and Louis Sahagun,Los Angeles Times | November 5, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts Schori was empowered to take charge of the Episcopal Church yesterday in a Gothic sanctuary filled with well-wishers and clouds of incense, becoming the first woman to lead a national church in the Anglican Communion's 520-year history. The investiture of Jefferts Schori, an airplane pilot and former oceanographer, as presiding bishop of the denomination drew a standing ovation from the 3,200 people in Washington's National Cathedral, which was decorated with banners and flowers displaying the "colors of dawn" she selected as a motif: blues, greens, orange, silver and gold.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2011
Despite the rain, snow and blustery wind Saturday, a crowd of more than 100 robed clergy and their congregants surrounded the 18-foot-tall bronze statue of Martin Luther that overlooks Lake Montebello and recreated the original unveiling service from 75 years ago. "Where he lived, there was lots of snow all the time," joked Bishop Wolfgang D. Herz-Lane, leader of the Delaware-Maryland Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. "This would not have deterred him. " The crowd, which tried to stay dry underneath two tents and umbrellas, followed the program of the statue's dedication on Oct. 31, 1936, offering the same prayers and intoning the same hymns.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 11, 2006
Of the fates that might await the Most Rev. Frank T. Griswold after he retires as the presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church in the United States, obscurity will not be one of them. When the history of the angry disputes in mainline Protestantism over the acceptance of homosexuality is written, Griswold, 68, will be remembered for leading the Episcopal Church when it elected the first openly gay man as a bishop. The decision deeply offended some in the church, and many primates of the worldwide Anglican Communion, of which the Episcopal Church is the American arm, saw it as a blatant disregard of Scripture.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2010
A man who said he resisted God's call to service for most of his life was installed Saturday as bishop of the Maryland- Delaware Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America before 500 in a Baltimore church. At a ceremony that alternated formal religious rites and lighter moments, the Rev. Wolfgang D. Herz-Lane told a crowd that included the presiding bishop of the ELCA that he first heard God's call as a schoolboy in his native Germany. But he pursued careers in journalism and social work before entering the seminary in his early 40s. "The more he called, the more I resisted," said Herz-Lane, 56. "But God has his ways, doesn't he?
NEWS
By MANYA A. BRACHEAR AND MARGARET RAMIREZ and MANYA A. BRACHEAR AND MARGARET RAMIREZ,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 22, 2006
Yielding to pressure from international Anglican leaders, the Episcopal Church agreed yesterday to "exercise restraint by not consenting" to the consecration of openly gay bishops, wording that some found oppressive and others called too vague. The resolution, which technically applies to any bishop "whose manner of life presents a challenge to the wider church and will lead to further strains on communion," followed Tuesday's defeat by the church's largest legislative body of a more strongly worded moratorium.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 30, 1997
Officials of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America have begun moving to revise a sweeping proposal for closer ties with the Episcopal Church, the first such effort since that proposal for "full communion" between the two denominations was rejected by a national Lutheran body in August.The proposal, the "Concordat of Agreement," does not call for a merger of the two churches but provides for each to recognize the other's sacraments and clergy and for collaboration in missionary work and major social service projects.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 9, 1998
Bishop John Maury Allin, the 23rd presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church, who was a pivotal supporter of Mississippi's NTC effort to rebuild burned black churches in the 1960s but was an ardent critic of the ordination of women, died Friday in Jackson, Miss.He was 77 and had been struggling with complications from a stroke he suffered a week before his death. He also had lung cancer.Bishop Allin was elected presiding bishop in 1973 and served in that position until he retired in 1986. Often called John the 23rd by those who knew him well, he was chosen to lead the church during one of its most divisive periods, as factions were beginning to press for the inclusion of blacks and women.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Sun Staff Writer | May 11, 1995
The presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church will tell the nation's Episcopalians today that he never intended to shield from prosecution the church's former treasurer, who is accused of embezzling about $2.2 million.The statement by the Most Rev. Edmond L. Browning will respond to "an outpouring of outrage from the grass roots" over what some have seen as a suggestion that charges would not be filed against Ellen Cooke, a church spokesman said.In a detailed message to church leaders, released to the public May 1, Bishop Browning disclosed that Mrs. Cooke is accused of diverting funds of the financially hard-pressed denomination to her personal use over a period of five years.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 7, 2001
WASHINGTON - After more than three decades of debate, the Episcopal Church and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America inaugurated an alliance yesterday that will allow them to share clergy members, churches and missionary work. The agreement on a full-communion relationship stops short of a merger, because each church will retain its own structure and worship style. But the compact, known as "Called to Common Mission," brings together two denominations that have been separated by fundamental differences over the role and authority of bishops.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2001
Unable to resolve a dispute with a dissident conservative priest through church channels, the acting bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington has gone to federal court seeking an injunction to regain control of a Prince George's County parish. Bishop Jane H. Dixon filed suit Monday in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt, asking that a federal judge prohibit the Rev. Samuel L. Edwards from officiating at Christ Episcopal Church in Accokeek. Dixon also is asking the court to order the vestry, the lay body that runs the 120-member church, to allow her to visit and minister at the parish.
NEWS
By Louis Sahagun and Louis Sahagun,Los Angeles Times | November 5, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts Schori was empowered to take charge of the Episcopal Church yesterday in a Gothic sanctuary filled with well-wishers and clouds of incense, becoming the first woman to lead a national church in the Anglican Communion's 520-year history. The investiture of Jefferts Schori, an airplane pilot and former oceanographer, as presiding bishop of the denomination drew a standing ovation from the 3,200 people in Washington's National Cathedral, which was decorated with banners and flowers displaying the "colors of dawn" she selected as a motif: blues, greens, orange, silver and gold.
NEWS
By MANYA A. BRACHEAR AND MARGARET RAMIREZ and MANYA A. BRACHEAR AND MARGARET RAMIREZ,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 22, 2006
Yielding to pressure from international Anglican leaders, the Episcopal Church agreed yesterday to "exercise restraint by not consenting" to the consecration of openly gay bishops, wording that some found oppressive and others called too vague. The resolution, which technically applies to any bishop "whose manner of life presents a challenge to the wider church and will lead to further strains on communion," followed Tuesday's defeat by the church's largest legislative body of a more strongly worded moratorium.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 11, 2006
Of the fates that might await the Most Rev. Frank T. Griswold after he retires as the presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church in the United States, obscurity will not be one of them. When the history of the angry disputes in mainline Protestantism over the acceptance of homosexuality is written, Griswold, 68, will be remembered for leading the Episcopal Church when it elected the first openly gay man as a bishop. The decision deeply offended some in the church, and many primates of the worldwide Anglican Communion, of which the Episcopal Church is the American arm, saw it as a blatant disregard of Scripture.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2001
Unable to resolve a dispute with a dissident conservative priest through church channels, the acting bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington has gone to federal court seeking an injunction to regain control of a Prince George's County parish. Bishop Jane H. Dixon filed suit Monday in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt, asking that a federal judge prohibit the Rev. Samuel L. Edwards from officiating at Christ Episcopal Church in Accokeek. Dixon also is asking the court to order the vestry, the lay body that runs the 120-member church, to allow her to visit and minister at the parish.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 7, 2001
WASHINGTON - After more than three decades of debate, the Episcopal Church and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America inaugurated an alliance yesterday that will allow them to share clergy members, churches and missionary work. The agreement on a full-communion relationship stops short of a merger, because each church will retain its own structure and worship style. But the compact, known as "Called to Common Mission," brings together two denominations that have been separated by fundamental differences over the role and authority of bishops.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2000
In an extraordinary move, two foreign Anglican primates, who believe the Episcopal Church has strayed from its biblical roots, have consecrated two U.S. priests as bishops to minister to conservative church members. The move, fueled by a dispute over the acceptance of homosexuality and the ordination of women, was angrily denounced by the Episcopal Church's presiding bishop. The Archbishop of Canterbury also criticized the consecrations. On Saturday, the archbishops of the provinces of Rwanda and of South East Asia consecrated the Rev. Charles H. Murphy III, of South Carolina, and the Rev. John H. Rodgers Jr., of Pennsylvania, in a ceremony attended by four other bishops in Singapore.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2010
A man who said he resisted God's call to service for most of his life was installed Saturday as bishop of the Maryland- Delaware Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America before 500 in a Baltimore church. At a ceremony that alternated formal religious rites and lighter moments, the Rev. Wolfgang D. Herz-Lane told a crowd that included the presiding bishop of the ELCA that he first heard God's call as a schoolboy in his native Germany. But he pursued careers in journalism and social work before entering the seminary in his early 40s. "The more he called, the more I resisted," said Herz-Lane, 56. "But God has his ways, doesn't he?
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2000
In an extraordinary move, two foreign Anglican primates, who believe the Episcopal Church has strayed from its biblical roots, have consecrated two U.S. priests as bishops to minister to conservative church members. The move, fueled by a dispute over the acceptance of homosexuality and the ordination of women, was angrily denounced by the Episcopal Church's presiding bishop. The Archbishop of Canterbury also criticized the consecrations. On Saturday, the archbishops of the provinces of Rwanda and of South East Asia consecrated the Rev. Charles H. Murphy III, of South Carolina, and the Rev. John H. Rodgers Jr., of Pennsylvania, in a ceremony attended by four other bishops in Singapore.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 23, 1998
CAPE TOWN, South Africa -- An explosive document urging a new approach to some of the most divisive and sensitive issues of human sexuality will be presented to a major meeting of Anglican bishops next month, threatening the unity of an already deeply divided church.Convening for their once-in-a-decade Lambeth Conference in England, 800 Anglican bishops from around the world will be asked to adopt a "way three" of viewing such issues as out-of-wedlock birth, the remarriage of divorcees, faithful homosexual relationships and polygamy.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 9, 1998
Bishop John Maury Allin, the 23rd presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church, who was a pivotal supporter of Mississippi's NTC effort to rebuild burned black churches in the 1960s but was an ardent critic of the ordination of women, died Friday in Jackson, Miss.He was 77 and had been struggling with complications from a stroke he suffered a week before his death. He also had lung cancer.Bishop Allin was elected presiding bishop in 1973 and served in that position until he retired in 1986. Often called John the 23rd by those who knew him well, he was chosen to lead the church during one of its most divisive periods, as factions were beginning to press for the inclusion of blacks and women.
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