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Susan Reimer | September 2, 2012
Susan Reimer 's column abut the Republican platform on abortion again shows her expertise in setting up a straw man and then knocking him down ("Presidential election or abortion referendum?" Aug. 27). The Republican platform comprises about 45 pages and sets forth the Republican Party's proposals for every major issue that confronts America both domestically and internationally. Sanctity of life is only one of its more than 100 proposals. Yet in Ms. Reimer's biased and myopic view, the Republican platform concerns only abortion and does not deal with other important election issues.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 20, 2013
Don't look now, my fellow Marylanders, but I think the Martin O'Malley victory lap has commenced. The governor, with a year and a half to go in his second and final term, has started telling us all about his impressive tenure. The governor gave a speech over the weekend that was mostly that - a way of cementing the local narrative about how his pragmatism and competency got us through the worst economic cycle in decades. Like everything else O'Malley does, it's all part of a strategy to enhance his standing as a Democratic presidential candidate in 2016.
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NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | April 12, 2000
PRESIDENTIAL campaigns in gentler days used to be compared with sports events - for example, a horse race in which there were winter-book favorites and handicapping, leading to a winner and losers. Or baseball, with the primary elections cast as a sort of spring training, leading up to the World Series in November. More recently, with the advent of political hired guns whose motivation is to win at any cost, the comparison increasingly has been not with sports, but with warfare. A candidate's objective is to attack and destroy his opponent and his reputation, usually couched in the more polite term of defining him before he can define himself.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 2, 2012
Susan Reimer 's column abut the Republican platform on abortion again shows her expertise in setting up a straw man and then knocking him down ("Presidential election or abortion referendum?" Aug. 27). The Republican platform comprises about 45 pages and sets forth the Republican Party's proposals for every major issue that confronts America both domestically and internationally. Sanctity of life is only one of its more than 100 proposals. Yet in Ms. Reimer's biased and myopic view, the Republican platform concerns only abortion and does not deal with other important election issues.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,TV Critic | January 27, 1992
The on-again, off-again anchor team of Catherine Crier and Bernard Shaw is back together again starting today at 4:30 p.m., as CNN launches "Inside Politics '92," a daily half-hour program devoted to presidential politics."
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 8, 2004
WASHINGTON - In the 27 short days that Congress has met this year, lawmakers have found time to vote on fetal rights and gun control. They have held hearings on a constitutional amendment against gay marriage. And they plan to crack down on indecency on television. The reason for tackling so many hot-button issues so early on? Presidential politics. The race for the White House is dominating nearly every congressional debate, from discussions on the federal budget to President Bush's call last month for an amendment barring same-sex marriages.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1998
Primary Colors" may well be one of the best movies ever made about presidential politics, but in 1998, that is not enough.In a nation jaded by politicians and "educated" by wall-to-wall news analysis, a depiction of the manipulations and rationalizations in big-time campaigns fails to surprise or even dishearten anymore. The conclusions "Primary Colors" draws exactly mirror the calculations millions of Americans long ago made about Bill Clinton: Yes, he's flawed -- terribly, disappointingly, depressingly -- but he's also a pretty good president."
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 8, 2000
WASHINGTON - Ever since the Know Nothing Party of the 1850s sought power with a message of virulent anti-Catholicism, religious prejudice has been a factor in presidential politics. Anti-Catholic bias was a major element in the defeat of New York's Democratic Gov. Alfred E. Smith, a Catholic, by Republican Herbert Hoover in 1928. In 1960, the prejudice was overcome by Sen. John F. Kennedy in his narrow victory over Vice President Richard M. Nixon. Since then, Catholicism has not been a bar to election at any political level.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | February 6, 1991
WASHINGTON -- For as long as there have been national governors' conferences, the chief topic of corridor conversation usually has been presidential politics. Those who weren't themselves running were always willing and eager to talk about those who were, or should have been.That, however, was before the United States went to war in the Persian Gulf and the governors, like Congress and the American people generally, fell in line behind the American troops in the field, if not always behind President Bush's policy of impatience with economic sanctions that put them there.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | June 30, 1995
LAST TIME, you recall, I promised to discuss presidential politics today but -- lucky, lucky you! -- it now seems we can skip it. I know, I know: You planned to skip it anyhow. I was hoping to skip it myself. Discussing presidential politics on a sweet day in June, as Lyndon Johnson once said of the jokes at the Gridiron dinner, is "about as much fun as throwing cow flops at the village idiot."You never heard of the Gridiron Dinner? It's your basic old-fashioned show-biz roast in fancy dress.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2012
At first glance, it might not seem like much, two men calling ABC's “Modern Family” one of their favorite TV shows. But when one is the Democratic president of the United States and the other his Republican challenger, you have to wonder if there isn't something special about the show that recently finished its third season as the most popular in prime time among young adult viewers. Last week, The New York Times reported that President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney both like iPads, grilled chicken, process-driven decisions and “Modern Family.” The shared sitcom is the item on the list that intrigues me. Everyone knows “Modern Family” is funny, winning and wise.
NEWS
September 30, 2011
Whether one supports or opposes President Barack Obama's health care reform law, the administration's choice not to prolong the appeals in the legal challenges to the act and to move the matter to the Supreme Court for review in the upcoming term should be welcome news. Much is at stake in the debate, and advocates and foes alike have now had an adequate opportunity to generate their arguments. Naturally, last week's decision generated endless speculation inside the Capitol Beltway about the political implications of a possible Supreme Court ruling next June in the midst of a presidential election campaign.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | July 30, 2008
I WANT to believe that our country can see beyond race as a factor in voting for a presidential candidate ... but on some level, it would be naive to think that race will not be a factor. I do believe, however, that there is much less racism, sexism and homophobia among the younger generation and that we have come a long way." That's Barbra Streisand, talking to Politico.com. The Oscar/Emmy/Grammy/Tony winner concedes that in the matter of stars speaking out on anything other their latest film, there is resistance: "On a very basic level, many people think celebrities have so much already, so we shouldn't be entitled to political opinions.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | March 26, 2008
Vernie C. Randall, a lively centenarian who enjoyed reading and following presidential politics, died Monday of complications from a stroke at the Fairhaven Retirement Community in Sykesville. She was 104. "She was a marvelous and most friendly person. When she entered the dining room, everyone waved. It was like the queen was arriving," said the Rt. Rev. David W. Leighton, the retired Episcopal bishop of Maryland. "Everyone loved to go and see Vernie because she was so joyful and alive," he said.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 5, 2008
ABC News is clearing its slate of prime-time entertainment shows tonight to make room for Charles Gibson, Diane Sawyer and live wall-to-wall political coverage. On CBS, Katie Couric and newly hired political analysts such as Joe Trippi will supplant action-adventure drama, while NBC pre-empts one of its highest-rated series for Brian Williams and Tim Russert. With 24 states up for grabs on Super Tuesday, the networks - bolstered by rising interest in the primaries - have suddenly become super-serious about covering presidential politics.
NEWS
By Kathleen Clary Miller | January 13, 2008
It's that time again. Every four years it creeps up on me like a colonoscopy: the presidential election. Campaign season produces symptoms in me that are similar to the medical examination: I can't eat, I feel as if I'm being hit from behind, and I need anesthesia to get me through it. Fear of polyps is nothing compared with fear of politics. Yes, I know - I am supposed to be grateful we are a free nation that enjoys such trappings of liberty. But I still dread it. What difference can it make who becomes president when I can't believe what any of them say?
NEWS
October 28, 2004
John Splaine, professor emeritus at the University of Maryland and a longtime consultant to C-SPAN television, spoke about politics and the media last week at Glenelg Country School. Splaine addressed upper-school juniors and seniors and parents during the school day and at an evening forum. Citing research from www.pewresearchcenter.org, Splaine said that about 75 percent of Americans used television as their primary source for political coverage. His lecture, "Television's Hidden Agenda in Presidential Politics," explained how political candidates are packaged for television; how political commercials communicate subliminal messages; and how television coverage influences the outcome of political debates.
NEWS
April 7, 1995
Richard E. Jablonski, 67, national president of the Union of Poles in America Inc. since 1962, died Saturday of diabetes in Cleveland. The 100-year-old fraternal insurance organization was formed when Polish immigrants often were denied life insurance because of the dangerous jobs they held in steel mills and factories. It has 10,000 members.Thomas Mandel, 49, a computer wiz who helped shape the development of online media, died Wednesday of lung cancer in Stanford, Calif. A self-proclaimed cyberholic, he played a key role in moving Time, Fortune, People and Sports Illustrated onto the commercial online services.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | November 9, 2007
BOSTON -- Let me review the long, winding aftermath of the Oct. 30 debate in which most candidates focused their, um, attention on the front-runner. The Clinton folks had the gall to put up a video called "The Politics of Pile-On." For revealing the hitherto unknown fact that Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton's opponents were all men, the campaign was accused of saying that the boys had ganged up on the girl. That was followed by a campaign e-mail that called Mrs. Clinton "one strong woman," when everyone knows they should have called the senator "one strong person."
NEWS
February 23, 2007
BOSTON -- I suppose you could describe these two women as cyber-trailblazers. But their cybertrails, alas, followed them from a checkered past, not to the glorious future. And the blaze they created was a bit more like a flameout. Bloggers Amanda Marcotte and Melissa McEwan came in from the heady environment of the blogosphere to the more staid climate of presidential politics, to work for John Edwards. The political cyberspace where they were known as Pandagon and Shakespeare's Sister is usually described with euphemisms such as "raucous" and "freewheeling."
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