Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPresidential Palace
IN THE NEWS

Presidential Palace

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 28, 1991
ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia (AP) -- A dozen Ethiopian military tanks rolled into the capital yesterday afternoon, belching smoke and breaking pavement as they clambered up the eucalyptus-lined drive below the presidential palace.They traded fire with the palace guard for about 15 minutes, and the exchange between forces that had been on the same side sent people hurrying home in this city of 3 million.Two huge blasts on the southern outskirts, where rebels were thought to be advancing, sent white smoke billowing toward the city.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 8, 2004
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - Gunmen presumed loyal to exiled President Jean-Bertrand Aristide ambushed a march yesterday by hundreds of thousands of Haitians celebrating his ouster, killing at least five people and wounding 20. The violence was the worst such incident since Aristide fled to Africa a week ago, and the gunfire unleashed panic among the huge crowd, which had been chanting its hopes for a new Haiti in the parks and avenues surrounding the presidential...
Advertisement
NEWS
By New York Times | September 10, 1990
HELSINKI, Finland -- It was hard to believe, watching the two presidents boast about their new cooperation at the United Nations and at their three summit meetings, that it was less than two years ago that the Soviet Union still had an aura of evil for the presidential candidate George Bush.While their differences became clearer after seven hours of talks at the Presidential Palace, Bush did not seem disappointed. Rather, he seemed swept away by the symbolism of Mikhail S. Gorbachev's smile.
NEWS
By Richard C. Paddock and Richard C. Paddock,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 28, 2003
MANILA, Philippines - A notorious Islamic militant arrested in May has confessed to police that he plotted to attack the Philippine presidential palace using Arab suicide bombers, according to a confidential police report of his interrogation. Mukhlis Yunos, a suspect with links to Jemaah Islamiah, a Southeast Asia terror network, said he was on his way to Manila to prepare for the attacks when he was arrested with a co-conspirator, an Egyptian businessman, according to a copy of the report obtained by the Los Angeles Times.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 23, 2002
KABUL, Afghanistan - U.S. soldiers and Special Forces will move into the presidential palace and take over responsibility for the security of President Hamid Karzai, illustrating concern for his safety after the assassination of a vice president this month, a presidential spokesman said yesterday. In Washington, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said the newest mission for U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan might last several months and is designed to ensure that Afghans keep Karzai, who was recently appointed by a grand council of representatives from all over the country.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 8, 2002
BOGOTA, Colombia - Colombia's new hard-line President Alvaro Uribe held his nation's highest job for just minutes yesterday before explosions shook the capital near the presidential palace and neighboring slums, killing at least 14 people and wounding 28 as the inauguration took place just a block away. Uribe was elected May 26 after campaigning on the promise of a firmer hand against terrorists. The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, which has led a 38-year-old insurgency, is widely expected to wreak havoc here in the coming weeks to protest Uribe's election; it is also believed to be responsible for yesterday's blasts.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 14, 1995
PARIS -- Fidel Castro was treated to a trumpet-and-drum fanfare yesterday at the French presidential palace, where he happily told President Francois Mitterrand over lunch that his first visit to France signaled the end of the "apartheid" imposed by the West on his island nation.The Cuban president, one of the world's last surviving Communist leaders, was embraced by many in France, where the Socialist president himself recently called the U.S.-led blockade of Cuba "stupid" and where Mr. Mitterrand's wife is one of Mr. Castro's biggest defenders.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 12, 1993
SANTIAGO, Chile -- On Thursday, students began throwing rocks and Molotov cocktails and burning tires. On Friday, hundreds of supporters of Gen. Augusto Pinochet staged an all-night vigil outside his home.Yesterday, Socialists and Communists marched on the presidential palace and skirmished with the police; three bombs were deactivated at headquarters of right-wing political parties; two other bombs exploded at power pylons, and two McDonald's and one Kentucky Fried Chicken outlet -- symbols of U.S. business presence here -- were targets of attempted bombings.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 8, 2004
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - Gunmen presumed loyal to exiled President Jean-Bertrand Aristide ambushed a march yesterday by hundreds of thousands of Haitians celebrating his ouster, killing at least five people and wounding 20. The violence was the worst such incident since Aristide fled to Africa a week ago, and the gunfire unleashed panic among the huge crowd, which had been chanting its hopes for a new Haiti in the parks and avenues surrounding the presidential...
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 14, 1995
PARIS -- Fidel Castro was treated to a trumpet-and-drum fanfare yesterday at the French presidential palace, where he happily told President Francois Mitterrand over lunch that his first visit to France signaled the end of the "apartheid" imposed by the West on his island nation.The Cuban president, one of the world's last surviving Communist leaders, was embraced by many in France, where the Socialist president himself recently called the U.S.-led blockade of Cuba "stupid" and where Mr. Mitterrand's wife is one of Mr. Castro's biggest defenders.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 16, 2003
TIKRIT, Iraq - A few friends gathered on a Tikrit sidewalk yesterday and reminisced about the good old days under President Saddam Hussein. "We love him," said Madullah Hachem, a government worker with a jet-black beard and dazzling white tunic. "He gave money to the poor. He helped every man. And he made the city secure. Saddam Hussein loved God. We want him back." Hachem and a couple of his friends nodded cautiously when asked if Hussein could return to power. "God willing," one intoned.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 8, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Gunfire erupted on the grounds of the Republican Palace early today, almost 24 hours after an American tank column entered the compound, which has been repeatedly bombed by allied planes since the war began. The explosions shook awake residents of a city that has now come to resemble a battlefield, with Iraqi special forces and militiamen taking up position on crucial streets and bridges. Low-flying aircraft bombed targets around the north end of the presidential compound and near the Planning Ministry.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 8, 2002
BOGOTA, Colombia - Colombia's new hard-line President Alvaro Uribe held his nation's highest job for just minutes yesterday before explosions shook the capital near the presidential palace and neighboring slums, killing at least 14 people and wounding 28 as the inauguration took place just a block away. Uribe was elected May 26 after campaigning on the promise of a firmer hand against terrorists. The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, which has led a 38-year-old insurgency, is widely expected to wreak havoc here in the coming weeks to protest Uribe's election; it is also believed to be responsible for yesterday's blasts.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 23, 2002
KABUL, Afghanistan - U.S. soldiers and Special Forces will move into the presidential palace and take over responsibility for the security of President Hamid Karzai, illustrating concern for his safety after the assassination of a vice president this month, a presidential spokesman said yesterday. In Washington, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said the newest mission for U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan might last several months and is designed to ensure that Afghans keep Karzai, who was recently appointed by a grand council of representatives from all over the country.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 17, 2001
ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast - A flurry of reports from Congo yesterday said that President Laurent Kabila, who deposed one of Africa's great dictators but then brought his country into even worse disarray, had been shot and killed. The president of the Democratic Republic of Congo was shot by one of his bodyguards, according to John E. Aycoth, a lobbyist and public relations consultant in Washington who acts as Kabila's spokesman in the United States. He said he had talked to top Congolese officials, who told him that the president was dead.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 14, 1995
PARIS -- Fidel Castro was treated to a trumpet-and-drum fanfare yesterday at the French presidential palace, where he happily told President Francois Mitterrand over lunch that his first visit to France signaled the end of the "apartheid" imposed by the West on his island nation.The Cuban president, one of the world's last surviving Communist leaders, was embraced by many in France, where the Socialist president himself recently called the U.S.-led blockade of Cuba "stupid" and where Mr. Mitterrand's wife is one of Mr. Castro's biggest defenders.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 17, 2001
ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast - A flurry of reports from Congo yesterday said that President Laurent Kabila, who deposed one of Africa's great dictators but then brought his country into even worse disarray, had been shot and killed. The president of the Democratic Republic of Congo was shot by one of his bodyguards, according to John E. Aycoth, a lobbyist and public relations consultant in Washington who acts as Kabila's spokesman in the United States. He said he had talked to top Congolese officials, who told him that the president was dead.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 16, 2003
TIKRIT, Iraq - A few friends gathered on a Tikrit sidewalk yesterday and reminisced about the good old days under President Saddam Hussein. "We love him," said Madullah Hachem, a government worker with a jet-black beard and dazzling white tunic. "He gave money to the poor. He helped every man. And he made the city secure. Saddam Hussein loved God. We want him back." Hachem and a couple of his friends nodded cautiously when asked if Hussein could return to power. "God willing," one intoned.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 14, 1995
PARIS -- Fidel Castro was treated to a trumpet-and-drum fanfare yesterday at the French presidential palace, where he happily told President Francois Mitterrand over lunch that his first visit to France signaled the end of the "apartheid" imposed by the West on his island nation.The Cuban president, one of the world's last surviving Communist leaders, was embraced by many in France, where the Socialist president himself recently called the U.S.-led blockade of Cuba "stupid" and where Mr. Mitterrand's wife is one of Mr. Castro's biggest defenders.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 3, 1995
ARGUN, Russia -- Jubilant Chechen soldiers strolled through the burning center of Grozny yesterday, waving their green separatist flag in triumph after battling Russian troops back to the edge of the city.The fight for the capital is far from over, but less than 24 hours after the Russian defense minister, Gen. Pavel S. Grachev, announced that his forces controlled the area around Grozny's presidential palace, the only Russians to be found there were dead soldiers and prisoners of war, according to reports from the scene.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.