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By Baltimore Sun staff | August 26, 2008
Tonight Convention keynote address by former Gov. Mark Warner of Virginia. Headliner: Sen. Hillary Clinton Additional speakers include: House Democratic Leader Steny H. Hoyer, Rep. Chris Van Hollen, chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, and Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, dean of Senate women. Tomorrow Nomination of Sen. Barack Obama and vice presidential nominee. Headliner: Vice presidential nominee Sen. Joe Biden Additional speakers include: Former President Bill Clinton and 2004 presidential nominee Sen. John Kerry.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jake Nevins and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
Hillary Clinton's quasi-presidential-campaign-but-actually-book-tour hit "The Daily Show" with Jon Stewart Tuesday night and, as always with the scathing, satirical talk-show heavyweight, the interview did not disappoint. Jon spent a fair amount of time attempting to weasel his way into landing the much-coveted Clinton presidential announcement, and while the former secretary of state remained painstakingly coy on the matter, the host got pretty creative in his interrogative methods.
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NEWS
June 22, 1992
The Miller Center Commission at the University of Virginia has just issued a timely reminder to Americans about the importance of what Gov. Bill Clinton and Ross Perot are about to do: select running mates.The commission, chaired by former vice presidential nominee Edmund Muskie and former Maryland Sen. Charles McC. Mathias, devoted a couple of years to studying how vice presidents have been chosen and made recommendations about how they should be chosen.The commission pointed out that since 1945 three vice presidents have become presidents due to death or resignation and five of the last nine vice presidents have become presidents either by accession or election.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 30, 2014
The alleged "raid" on the Republican senatorial primary in Mississippi, wherein black Democratic voters were said to have crossed over to vote for longtime incumbent Thad Cochran, has outraged his tea-party challengers. It sounds like a version of the old Dixie lament that "those people" should stay with their own kind. The real culprit is the Magnolia State itself, for holding an open primary law that allows voters to participate in a runoff regardless of party. And it's another reminder of the basic Republican problem of being branded as hostile or just unaccommodating to minority voters and their interests.
NEWS
February 6, 1991
Sen. Terry Sanford of North Carolina, despondent because his Democrats have lost five of the last six presidential elections, has written Senate colleagues suggesting a conference next year of Democratic representatives and Democratic governors. The conference would cast a straw vote on the presidential hopefuls. He says this would influence the national convention's decision on a presidential nominee. It might, but we doubt it. It is likely that in 1992, as in every presidential year since 1960, this decision will effectively be made by rank-and-file voters before the delegates convene.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | April 27, 2004
CHICAGO - John Kerry is looking for a running mate, and he's getting lots of advice: Pick North Carolina Sen. John Edwards to make the ticket competitive in the South. Pick Rep. Richard A. Gephardt to energize organized labor. Pick Sen. Bob Graham to bolster support in the key swing state of Florida. Here's my advice to Mr. Kerry on choosing a running mate: Don't. It's an inescapable fact that a presidential nominee has to have a vice presidential nominee, though many would have been happy to do without.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Annapolis Bureau | May 1, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer, Maryland's No. 1 Democrat, doesn't much like his party's apparent presidential nominee and might not attend its convention this July in New York.DTC "I'll work for the Democratic candidates for Congress, the local Democrats," Mr. Schaefer said.But what about the party's presidential candidate?"I don't know who's running yet," he said, quickly adding, "Now that's a way of getting out of it." He said he thought the nominee could still be someone other than Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | January 29, 1992
GOV. BILL CLINTON's nationally televised speech in which hedenied having an improper relationship with a woman was often refered to as another "Nixon Checkers speech."This reference may have escaped some younger readers. The original Checkers speech was delivered nearly 40 years ago. In that speech Richard Nixon denied having an improper relationship with a cocker spaniel. Let me re-phrase that. Nixon denied having an improper relationship with businessmen. More on the mutt later.In 1952, then Senator Nixon was the Republican vice presidential nominee on the ticket with Gen. Dwight Eisenhower.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | June 20, 1991
NOW THAT those two old pals, Virginia's Gov. L. Douglas Wilder and Sen. Charles Robb, have informed the world that there never really was any feud going on between them, they may be naive enough to believe that they can walk away unscarred from the sorry spectacle of their public alley fight.For openers, the prospects of each for a place on the 1992 Democratic national ticket surely are dimmed not only by the publicity given to rumors about their personal lives but also by their displays of personal vindictiveness and pettiness, and their disregard for the reputation of their party.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 2, 2002
NEW YORK -- Sen. Joe Lieberman created a bit of a stir at the Democratic Leadership Council meeting this week by taking issue with the language used in the 2000 election by ticket-mate Al Gore, who criticized Republican coziness with corporate America. Mr. Gore had said in his nomination acceptance speech and during the campaign that "we're for the people, they're for the powerful," words that Mr. Lieberman said didn't square with the DLC philosophy of making an ally of big business, not an enemy.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 5, 2013
Secretary of State John Kerry still has a long way to go in his intensive quest for Palestinian-Israeli peace. But his diligent and persuasive pursuit of it suggests that his uneven career search for a legacy of his own may finally have found its proper track. The decorated Vietnam War veteran who first won prominence as a vocal critic of that war went on to be a U.S. senator from Massachusetts and in 2004 the Democratic presidential nominee. But he was denied the presidency in a brutal political smearing of that honored service as a Navy swift boat commander.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan, the Republican Party's nominee for vice president last year, challenged the Maryland GOP on Thursday night to follow the example of the party in his home state of Wisconsin and take back the State House. Bringing a message of hope to Maryland's downtrodden Republicans, Ryan pointed to the Wisconsin GOP's success in seizing the governorship and both houses of the Legislature in 2010, while also making gains in the Congress. "We did it a few years ago in Wisconsin," he said.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | August 22, 2012
Last Friday, Paul Ryan, the presumptive Republican vice presidential nominee, made the most populist speech of this campaign season. "It's the people who are politically connected, it's the people who have access to Washington that get the breaks," he told an enthusiastic crowd of more than 2,000 at a high school gym in Virginia. "Well, no more. We don't want to pick winners and losers in Washington. ... Hardworking taxpayers should be treated fairly, and it should be based on whether they're good, whether they work hard and not who they know in Washington.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2012
Hundreds of Green Party members arrived Thursday in Baltimore to pick a candidate for president, even as the party has been forced to scramble for a spot on Maryland's ballot this fall. The national convention, which is taking place at the University of Baltimore before moving to a downtown hotel, doesn't have the glitz Democrats and Republicans will bring when they nominate Barack Obama and Mitt Romney later this year. But getting away from the money pervasive in national politics, Green Party leaders said, is at least partly the point.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 25, 2012
That pop you may or may not have heard the other day was the bursting pipedream of a centrist presidential candidate outside the establishment parties. The organizers of a group calling itself Americans Elect decided to close shop after failing to find anyone who would qualify to be its standard-bearer in November. No one who met the group's eligibility requirements to become its presidential nominee was able to corral the threshold 10,000 endorsements needed from "delegates" in an online nationwide convention.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2012
Despite high-profile races — including a Republican presidential contest that brought the candidates swinging through the state and a nationally significant House race in Western Maryland — elections officials predict that turnout could fall to near-record lows in Tuesday's primary. The ho-hum reaction in Maryland is being driven by several factors: lack of a competitive race at the top of the Democratic ticket; a primary date that falls in the middle of spring break for many schools; and the inability of most of the GOP presidential candidates to organize in one of the bluest states in the nation.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 7, 2004
WASHINGTON - As prospective Democratic presidential nominee John Kerry approached his choice of a vice presidential running mate, he was faced with a familiar challenge: Should he pick an individual who could help him win in November or one who, if he wins, could help him govern most effectively? It's customary for a presidential nominee to quote the standard platitude that he is looking for the ticket mate who is "best qualified to take over the country if anything should happen me." It is a yardstick more often than not bypassed as a candidate looks for the one who figures to help him carry a certain region or state or fill some real or perceived weakness in his own political rM-isumM-i.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | May 29, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Did you see where Gov. George W. Bush sent out letters to 450 prominent fellow Republicans around the country the other day asking for their advice on picking a running mate? It's an old device, going back at least as far as Richard Nixon 32 years ago, to massage the recipients and make them feel they have a say. They seldom have, because the factors that go into selecting a vice presidential nominee don't lend themselves to a referendum. Most often, they depend on the presidential nominee's political and personal requirements and desires.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE and EILEEN AMBROSE,eileen.ambrose@baltsun.com | February 8, 2009
Plenty of us worry about making mistakes on our taxes. And when high-profile taxpayers stumble so publicly, as President Barack Obama's nominees have recently, it often makes the rest of us think back to past tax returns and whether we did everything right. Granted, taxes are confusing. But you never want to be on the wrong side of the IRS. Because as we have seen, it eventually can catch up to you. So, just in case the Obama administration throws your hat in the ring, here's how to avoid some mistakes of past nominees: Nanny taxes: These are the payroll and unemployment taxes employers must pay once their domestic employees' income reaches a certain level.
NEWS
By ANDREW RATNER and ANDREW RATNER,andrew.ratner@baltsun.com | September 30, 2008
You can argue all you want about the wisdom of Gov. Sarah Palin as a vice presidential nominee - and online America has been doing just that. To the independent political bloggers, she is catnip - a source for endless comment on whether she's unqualified to be a heartbeat from the presidency or an authentic, inspirational fresh face on the national political scene. The more she's avoided traditional media, the more the new media have moved in to dissect and define her. And the attention will intensify this week in preparation for Thursday's vice presidential debate.
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