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By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
President Barack Obama swung through Baltimore on Tuesday for a trio of fundraisers intended to energize the deep-pocketed donors his campaign will need to compete amid the onslaught of money flowing into this year's presidential election. At a small gathering of wealthy contributors in Owings Mills and a separate event that drew about 600 people to the Hyatt Regency at the Inner Harbor, Obama focused his remarks on the economic recovery while taking jabs at challenger Mitt Romney - at one point suggesting the Republican's campaign message is so thin it could be summed up in a tweet.
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NEWS
November 22, 2013
Governor O'Malley's first 2016 presidential ad, “Belief”, debuted at the New Hampshire Democrats' Jefferson-Jackson Dinner last weekend.  The video played fast and loose with the truth, and both Change Maryland and Fox 45 fact checked the claims made in the ad. With the help of our multiple Mobbie-nominated friend Jim Jamitis, aka @anthropocon, we did our own VH1-style fact check of the governor. Enjoy.  --Mark Newgent Red Maryland has strived to be the premier blog and radio network of conservative and Republican politics and ideas in the free state since 2007.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 15, 1999
WASHINGTON -- To the average voter, the following names probably mean little or nothing: Tony Coelho, Gina Glantz, Bill Dal Col, Karl Rove, Rick Davis, Frank Cannon, Sal Russo, Dan Godzich. But in the roster of shakers and movers for the presidential politics of 2000, one of them likely will be hailed a year from now as the maker of the next president.They are the campaign managers and/or chief political strategists of the two Democratic and six surviving Republican candidates.Except for Coelho, the former California congressman who is running Vice President Al Gore's campaign and getting celebrity treatment in the media as a hard-nosed, take-charge guy in a turbulent operation, the group is relatively anonymous -- by intent.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 10, 2013
An old reporter often begins his daily routine by turning to the newspaper's obituary page with mild trepidation, fearing another friend has gone to that great newsroom in the sky. So it was this week in reading of the death in Baltimore, at only 62, of Richard Ben Cramer, arguably the best writer of a presidential campaign chronicle ever. That would be his 1,047-page opus of one of the less memorable contests, in 1988, among six less-than-heroic candidates: Republicans George H.W. Bush, the eventual winner, and Bob Dole; and Democrats Michael Dukakis, the eventual party nominee, Richard Gephardt, Joe Biden and Gary Hart.
NEWS
February 27, 2012
I agree wholeheartedly that the Supreme Court should revisit the Citizens United decision and put the brakes on the outrageous amount of money being spent on presidential campaigns by supposedly "independent" Super PACs ("Buying the presidency," Feb. 24). When politicians never stop chasing the money needed to get elected or re-elected, it's time to do something about it. There is something truly wrong when all those millions of megabucks are being spent on negative ads while the country is facing an enormous debt and millions of people are without jobs, homes and a decent quality of life.
NEWS
February 23, 1991
The Federal Election Commission estimates there will not be enough money in the Presidential Election Campaign Fund in 1992. This is a fund created in 1974 to provide public financing for presidential candidates. The fund comes from taxpayers earmarking $1 or $2 of their income tax payments for that purpose. In the past, taxpayers have designated enough money to cover the public's share of campaign costs.In 1988, the cost to taxpayers for presidential candidates was $178 million. It should be less in 1992, but more than the $125 million projected for the fund early that year.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | February 3, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The woeful shortcomings of the Federal Election Commission have been highlighted by admissions that the overworked, underfunded agency hasn't been able to pounce upon the well-publicized campaign-finance abuses of the 1996 presidential campaign.The admission came in the course of a plea to a Senate committee for $6.6 million more to deal with the 1996 allegations, and it occasioned no surprise. Even in presidential-election cycles with far fewer allegations of campaign fund-raising hanky-panky, the FEC has always lagged years behind in investigating possible violations of federal law.Presidential candidates and their campaign managers have learned that they can skirt the edges of, or even violate outright, campaign-finance laws without being found out until long after the fact.
NEWS
By Lisa Getter and Lisa Getter,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 8, 2004
WASHINGTON - As Howard Dean's presidential campaign tore through the millions it raised last year, nearly a quarter of it went to the company owned in part by his former campaign manager. The campaign paid $7.2 million to Trippi, McMahon and Squier, the Virginia-based consulting and media firm - 23 percent of the $31 million it spent through Dec. 31, according to PoliticalMoneyLine, which tracks political spending. Joe Trippi, one of the company's partners, was Dean's campaign manager for a year - until he was ousted last month and replaced by Roy Neel as chief executive.
NEWS
August 27, 2004
POST-WATERGATE designers of the Federal Election Commission may have believed they were building in a device to keep it honest by dividing appointments to the six-member board equally between Republicans and Democrats. But what they did instead was create a system in which partisan advocates regulate campaign activities in a way that favors the interests of the parties at the expense of efforts to diminish the influence of money in politics. Some version of the current slimefest between supporters of President Bush and those of his Democratic challenger, John Kerry, would likely have developed in any event.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 21, 2004
WASHINGTON - The amount of cash bankrolling the two presidential campaigns this year is approaching and might well exceed $1 billion - an eye-popping number that has shattered any hope that recent campaign finance reform would put a brake on spending. Alone, President Bush and Democrat John Kerry will, by this summer, have raised at least $565 million, according to new figures released by the government and the campaigns yesterday. That includes $230 million for Bush (a record in the history of presidential campaigns)
NEWS
By Benjamin R. Barber | September 25, 2012
The outcome of November's presidential election will affect the entire world. Yet until the attack on our consulate in Libya, issues of foreign policy and globalization were nearly absent from the political discourse. There was talk at both parties' political conventions about American exceptionalism and the nation's exalted place in the world, but little was said about the need for common action with other nations to secure our imperiled common planet. Even former President Bill Clinton stuck to the domestic agenda at his party's Charlotte, N.C., convention.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2012
- For three days, they hobnobbed with Republican stars, were pursued by reporters, cast ballots for their party's presidential nominee and generally had a taste of life at the center of the political universe. Today, Maryland's delegation to the Republican National Convention returns home to a state where Mitt Romney is given little chance of carrying in November and a slate of congressional candidates is being heavily outspent in every district but one. In other words, state Republicans come back to reality.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | August 23, 2012
I am so relieved that I don't live in a swing state. I can sleep through Nov. 6 and wake up knowing that Maryland's Electoral College votes will be safely in President Barack Obama's pocket - or Gov. Martin O'Malley will be in witness protection. Or I can do my civic duty and vote, without having to produce my birth certificate (the long form) and a cheek swab for a DNA test. Voter suppression is what they are doing in swing states this election - it's the flip side of loading people in a van to take them to the polls on Election Day. But if I lived in a state like Pennsylvania, Maryland's neighbor to the north, or Virginia, our neighbor to the south, I would have to spend the next two months listening to the 60s station on XM radio or watching old episodes of "Modern Family" on the DVR to avoid the political ads that are going to fill the air. President Obama and Mitt Romney are going to spend more than $1 billion on TV ads, and most of it will be in swing states.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 13, 2012
In the wake of the furor over the Supreme Court's salvation of President Barack Obama's health care act, the presidential campaign seems now to have settled down to the old partisan argument: The Republicans like to call it class warfare, while the Democratsprefer to use terms like income inequity. Either way, the debate amounts to whether government should jump in to level the economic playing field or get out of the way and let the engine of private enterprise generate sufficient wealth for all. The yardstick for success seems to be the rate of unemployment, currently at an unacceptable 8.2 percent.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 19, 2012
At the 40th anniversary of the Watergate break-in of the Democratic National Committee headquarters, an act that eventually led to the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon, the chief lesson seems hopelessly lost. The lesson was this: Of all the corrupting influences in politics, beyond the anything-goes mentality that can drive participants to excess in their quest to win, none takes a back seat to unlimited and unaccountable money. When the Nixon political apparatus got caught red-handed illegally entering the DNC offices on the night of June 17, 1972, one of the first responses, as Nixon himself said, was to find the funds that could buy the silence of the apprehended burglars.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
President Barack Obama swung through Baltimore on Tuesday for a trio of fundraisers intended to energize the deep-pocketed donors his campaign will need to compete amid the onslaught of money flowing into this year's presidential election. At a small gathering of wealthy contributors in Owings Mills and a separate event that drew about 600 people to the Hyatt Regency at the Inner Harbor, Obama focused his remarks on the economic recovery while taking jabs at challenger Mitt Romney - at one point suggesting the Republican's campaign message is so thin it could be summed up in a tweet.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND AND JULES WITCOVER | May 8, 1993
Washington -- One of the dirty little secrets about President Clinton's plan for campaign finance reform is that even many of those who will feel obliged to vote for it are hoping it will bite the dust. Another is that they probably will get their wish.And a third is that both Clinton and the Democratic leaders who stood with him in the Rose Garden are fully aware of both of those realities. It is, in short, a bit of a dance.Much of the resistance to the proposals is simple self-interest.
NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | July 9, 2004
AS A REPUBLICAN and strong Bush supporter, I am intrigued with John Kerry's selection of John Edwards as his running mate. If nothing else, I believed during the Democratic primaries that the North Carolina senator certainly could count. Sometime last year, Mr. Edwards came to the unpleasant but honest conclusion that he would not be re-elected to the Senate in his home state. He would become a one-term wonder assigned to the slag heap of political history. With such a disheartening scenario before him, what was a young, telegenic senator to do?
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | May 23, 2012
The Obama presidential campaign is debuting its latest online campaign organizing tool for the 2012 election, one that is expected to be use by volunteers across the country to connect with voters. The Wall Street Journal had a report on the tool -- called Dashboard -- that the Obama campaign is unveiling today. President Obama ran an aggressive online campaign back in 2008. Expect more online blitzes this year. Meanwhile, Mashable reports Mitt Romney has his own online social network for volunteers, called MyMitt . I'd love to hear from volunteers in Maryland who are using these online tools to help these campaigns with organization.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
For Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich, campaigning in Maryland on Tuesday represented something of a political homecoming. It was nearly 20 years ago that Gingrich, then a Georgia congressman, hatched the outlines of the "Contract with America" during a GOP retreat in Salisbury — a campaign pledge that gave his party control of Congress in 1994 and made him a force in American politics. The former Speaker of the House came to Maryland looking for another political coup: a path to the Republican nomination that by the end of the day seemed increasingly out of reach.
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