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NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau | October 8, 1993
TOKYO -- Twice within little more than a year Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin has jilted Japan out of a visit. Monday, he is expected to finally arrive and nothing -- not even an aborted revolution -- has shaken the Japanese confidence that he is coming."
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NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 18, 1998
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia -- From widely scattered parts of the world, members of the Romanov family who had gathered here yesterday fell to their knees when army officers began lowering the coffins of Nicholas II and his family into a white marble crypt in the Cathedral of SS. Peter and Paul.Some wiped away tears. An emperor was in his grave at last."We've addressed the most difficult part of our past," Duke Nikolai Romanovich, who lives in Switzerland, said later. "Now it's time to look to the future."
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NEWS
January 5, 1995
If Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin had managed to crush the Muslim rebellion in the Caucasus Mountain enclave of Chechnya with dispatch, he would be hailed today for the success and decisiveness of his brutal action.But more than three weeks after blitzing into that region, Russian troops still seem hopelessly bogged down. Despite heavy, indiscriminate aerial bombing and artillery barrage, a ragtag army of descendants of ancient mountain people is making a mockery of the Russian Army, the top military brass and President Yeltsin himself.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 13, 1998
MOSCOW -- Elizabeth from Ireland swooned over his magnificent head of hair, Caracas, Venezuela, wanted to know what he thought of Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the last Soviet leader (not much!) and "joecurrious" wondered if Russia was ready for a woman president.Unencumbered as he was by talk show candor or even diet tips, he had a handle powerful enough to persuade thousands of people around the world to try to crowd into a half-hour chat room yesterday afternoon.Boris N. Yeltsin was online, invited into cyberspace by MSNBC.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau | October 13, 1993
TOKYO -- Almost half a century after World War II ended for everyone else, Moscow and Tokyo may finally be getting ready to call it quits.Talking to Japanese leaders yesterday on the second day of his three-day trip to Japan, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin offered a long-awaited expression of sorrow for the hundreds of thousands of Japanese prisoners captured in the final days of war.Almost half the prisoners were said to have died in forced labor camps...
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Mark Matthews and Carl M. Cannon and Mark Matthews,Staff Writers The New York Times contributed to this article | April 4, 1993
VANCOUVER, British Columbia -- President Clinton an Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin began their summit here yesterday, immediately tackling the two momentous issues they face: how much western investment in Russia is prudent, and how Mr. Yeltsin will gain enough control over the Russian economy so that the West can fulfill its promises of financial help.Even before Mr. Clinton landed from Portland, Ore., the agenda was spelled out in a brief news conference featuring Mr. Yeltsin and Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, who praised Mr. Yeltsin for all he has done so far."
NEWS
April 27, 1993
It may take a few more days to establish the final results of Russia's weekend referendum, but exit polling, another newfangled Western political device in a country which shed communist rule only a year and a half ago, has given victory to President Boris N. Yeltsin.His support may rise or drop in the final outcome, when votes from the countryside trickle in. So may the degree to which Russians agreed or disagreed with the performance of the old-style Congress of People's Deputies. But none of that matters.
NEWS
March 11, 1994
Nixon-haters, of which there are legions in America and very few in Russia, will no doubt enjoy the dressing-down their Nemesis has received from Boris N. Yeltsin. The Russian leader angrily refused to meet the 81-year-old former president during his current Moscow visit because he had dared to call on some of Mr. Yeltsin's political enemies before meeting with him.This was a particularly stupid move on the part of President Yeltsin, whose response to the licking he took in December elections from ultra-nationalists has been to thump the patriotic drums and move right politically in an effort to head off his domestic foes.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | June 23, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The United States, wrestling uncomfortably with Russian threats toward Moldova, pressed President Boris N. Yeltsin yesterday to fulfill his commitment to withdraw his army from the area.The State Department confirmed that "elements" of the former Soviet 14th Army, now under Russian command, were involved in the fighting alongside ethnic Russians in the Moldovan civil war.The department spokeswoman, Margaret Tutwiler, said it was unclear in the confused situation whether these elements in fact were taking orders from Moscow; the army said its soldiers were acting on their own initiative.
NEWS
July 29, 1993
Summers have been a politically hazardous time in Moscow ever since the Soviet system began collapsing.Whenever Mikhail S. Gorbachev went on vacation, a perceptible power vacuum soon developed. There were rumors of dissension in the leadership, speculation about opposition plots. When a coup attempt finally was staged against him, it came during his summer vacation.Much has changed in Moscow in the past two years. But it looked like old times again last weekend when Russia's Central Bank suddenly declared all pre-1993 ruble notes invalid, plunging the country into panic.
NEWS
By Jeane Kirkpatrick | January 22, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Russian elections in December prompted little comment at the time they occurred, and that little was, as Peter Reddaway notes in the January 29 New Republic, ''remarkably sanguine.'' Most commentators suggested there had been no significant change from the previous election.But, Mr. Reddaway observes, the final returns ''show unambiguously that hard-line forces made big gains; that democratic parties suffered heavy losses; that forces hostile to market reform advanced; and that both President Yeltsin and Prime Minister Chernomyrdin were humiliated.
NEWS
January 5, 1995
If Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin had managed to crush the Muslim rebellion in the Caucasus Mountain enclave of Chechnya with dispatch, he would be hailed today for the success and decisiveness of his brutal action.But more than three weeks after blitzing into that region, Russian troops still seem hopelessly bogged down. Despite heavy, indiscriminate aerial bombing and artillery barrage, a ragtag army of descendants of ancient mountain people is making a mockery of the Russian Army, the top military brass and President Yeltsin himself.
NEWS
By WILL ENGLUND | December 18, 1994
Moscow -- When Prometheus delivered mankind from ignorance and misery with the gift of fire, Zeus punished him by chaining him to a mountain, where an eagle preyed on his liver. According to Greek legend, that mountain was in the Caucasus.In the thousands of years since, the myths of the Caucasian Mountains have kept coming back to such themes: vengeance and cruelty, and heroism tragically brought low.Today, those themes seem to be playing themselves out once more in that thorny, bristling region.
NEWS
March 11, 1994
Nixon-haters, of which there are legions in America and very few in Russia, will no doubt enjoy the dressing-down their Nemesis has received from Boris N. Yeltsin. The Russian leader angrily refused to meet the 81-year-old former president during his current Moscow visit because he had dared to call on some of Mr. Yeltsin's political enemies before meeting with him.This was a particularly stupid move on the part of President Yeltsin, whose response to the licking he took in December elections from ultra-nationalists has been to thump the patriotic drums and move right politically in an effort to head off his domestic foes.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 2, 1994
MOSCOW -- Russia wrote another page in the emerging post-Cold War spy thriller yesterday, revealing that it had captured a spy working here for Britain.The development, startling because it came so soon after an angry United States accused Russia of spying on the CIA, attracted little attention in a nation immersed in a growing political and economic morass.Russian anxiety yesterday was fixed on President Boris N. Yeltsin's reaction to the humiliating amnesty granted by parliament to his political foes.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | February 27, 1994
MOSCOW -- The leaders of last October's bloody uprising walked free from Lefortovo Prison yesterday, smiling to the cheers of their supporters and ushering in a new phase of heightened political anxiety.Alexander Rutskoi, who once proclaimed himself president of Russia while announcing the resurrection of the Soviet Union, and Ruslan Khasbulatov, a former professor who urged soldiers to attack the Kremlin to depose Boris N. Yeltsin, stepped out into the late afternoon sunshine and immediately seized the attention of the nation.
NEWS
December 14, 1993
The unexpectedly heavy backlash against Russia's democratic reforms and free-market policies is worrisome news. Instead of having a more cooperative parliament, President Boris N. Yeltsin now will have to deal with a substantial number of legislators from extreme right and left who have nothing but scorn for pluralistic democracy and efforts to dismantle the Soviet-era centralized economy.The strong showing of Vladimir Zhirinovsky ultra-nationalists produced instant jitters throughout Europe.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 2, 1994
MOSCOW -- Russia wrote another page in the emerging post-Cold War spy thriller yesterday, revealing that it had captured a spy working here for Britain.The development, startling because it came so soon after an angry United States accused Russia of spying on the CIA, attracted little attention in a nation immersed in a growing political and economic morass.Russian anxiety yesterday was fixed on President Boris N. Yeltsin's reaction to the humiliating amnesty granted by parliament to his political foes.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | January 17, 1994
MOSCOW -- Taking Russia and the world by surprise, economic reformer Yegor T. Gaidar resigned from the government yesterday, raising serious questions about President Boris N. Yeltsin's commitment to rapid reform.Mr. Gaidar's departure was particularly jolting, coming just a scant day after President Clinton left Moscow full of promises from Mr. Yeltsin to pursue economic reforms faster than ever."I cannot be in the government and in the opposition at the same time," Mr. Gaidar said in a letter to Mr. Yeltsin, adding that recent government policy was damaging economic progress and wasting millions of dollars.
NEWS
December 14, 1993
The unexpectedly heavy backlash against Russia's democratic reforms and free-market policies is worrisome news. Instead of having a more cooperative parliament, President Boris N. Yeltsin now will have to deal with a substantial number of legislators from extreme right and left who have nothing but scorn for pluralistic democracy and efforts to dismantle the Soviet-era centralized economy.The strong showing of Vladimir Zhirinovsky ultra-nationalists produced instant jitters throughout Europe.
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