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President Suharto

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By Steve H. Hanke | June 25, 2003
MOST PEOPLE think the overthrow of Saddam Hussein resulted from the U.S. government's embrace of a new policy. This particular policy may be new, but the "regime change" idea and its use are not. It is well known that Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz and a small group of like-minded neoconservatives developed the regime change idea some time ago and have been promoting it ever since. Mr. Hussein was not the first to fall in the cross hairs of that policy. When the U.S. government concluded that Philippine President Ferdinand Marcos was illegitimate, he had to go. Consequently, America actively assisted in his removal from power in 1986.
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NEWS
By Richard C. Paddock and Paul Watson and Richard C. Paddock and Paul Watson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 28, 2008
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- Former President Suharto, an army general who rose to power in Indonesia with the slaughter of hundreds of thousands of people and ruled for 32 years during an era of rapid economic growth and extraordinary graft, died yesterday in Indonesia. He was 86. Suharto's unyielding opposition to communism won him the backing of the United States during the height of the Cold War, although he was one of the most brutal and corrupt rulers of that era. He governed the world's fourth-most-populous nation with a combination of paternalism and ruthlessness from 1965 until he was ousted in spring 1998.
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NEWS
June 1, 1997
PARLIAMENTARY elections in Indonesia on Thursday were meant to confer legitimacy on the 30-year rule of President Suharto. It did no such thing.The regime allows two opposition parties, which it controls. One of them was running behind its customary 15 percent, reflecting protest against the purge of its rightful leader, Megawati Sukarnoputri.Mr. Suharto is expected to run next year, age 76, for a seventh term. His rule has finally unleashed the economy, making the fourth most populous country Asia's latest tiger.
NEWS
By Steve H. Hanke | June 25, 2003
MOST PEOPLE think the overthrow of Saddam Hussein resulted from the U.S. government's embrace of a new policy. This particular policy may be new, but the "regime change" idea and its use are not. It is well known that Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz and a small group of like-minded neoconservatives developed the regime change idea some time ago and have been promoting it ever since. Mr. Hussein was not the first to fall in the cross hairs of that policy. When the U.S. government concluded that Philippine President Ferdinand Marcos was illegitimate, he had to go. Consequently, America actively assisted in his removal from power in 1986.
NEWS
January 13, 1998
PRESIDENT Suharto brought three decades of stability in which Indonesia's worst poverty ended and its economy took off. He has been a stalwart ally to the United States. He also squashed dissent and assembled vast personal wealth.He is 76 and has no political heir. He is planning to be elected to a seventh term as president in March, by a consultative assembly of one thousand hand-picked members which can also revise the constitution. He has not been well. Indonesia never had a peaceful transition.
NEWS
April 11, 1998
THE THIRD TIME that President Suharto promised the International Monetary Fund to make economic reforms, he may have meant it.Twice before, Indonesia's elderly dictator agreed to close insolvent banks and end cartels and monopolies enjoyed by his family, if the IMF and rich countries would lend money to cover $74 billion in private-sector international debts.Twice he reneged, made his government more crony-infested and pushed his daughter Siti Hardijanti Rukmana (better known as Tutut) forward as heir apparent.
NEWS
June 2, 1998
B. J. HABIBIE, who became president of Indonesia for the next five years upon President Suharto's May 21 resignation, has given demonstrators more than he initially thought required.He has agreed to an election next year, without saying who would be eligible or how free the parties would be. His attorney general has launched an investigation into Suharto's legendary wealth and corruption, which might or might not be a whitewash.The election pledge has not appeased the opposition, which wants the tame legislative assembly to pick an interim president, untainted by Suhartoism, this summer.
NEWS
February 23, 1998
WHILE Malaysia, Thailand, South Korea and the Philippines may have turned the corner of their financial crises, Indonesia's plight worsens. Social breakdown looms as food riots increase. Political ossification prevents an economic solution.President Suharto at 76 is having himself elected next month, by a hand-picked assembly, to a seventh five-year term. He is having his old crony, B. Jusuf Habibie, the architect of grandiose projects and the enemy of reform, made vice president and successor.
NEWS
May 22, 1998
TOO LATE, General Suharto accepted the inevitable by resigning as president of Indonesia, after 32 years of personal rule. He elevated his protege, Vice President B. Jusuf Habibie, to serve out the remaining five years of the presidential term. That is not likely to happen.It was the old dictator's stubborn decision in March to make Mr. Habibie vice president that set off the final collapse of the rupiah and internal demonstrations demanding an end to the Suharto era. The calm departure of President Suharto is positive, but the Habibie presidency is not the answer -- a view domestic dissidents and world markets share.
NEWS
By Carl T. Rowan | May 25, 1998
WASHINGTON -- President Suharto, the Indonesian strongman of 32 years, has just been driven from power by an army of little people protesting rising food prices. Thus, he has learned the age-old truism that a leader can steal and cheat and commit myriad other sins, but he dare not take food off the people's plates.Mr. Suharto and his family have been cheating Indonesians -- who make up the fourth most populous country on earth -- since the 1960s when they exploited wheat given in the U.S. Food for Peace Program.
NEWS
By Seth Mydans and Seth Mydans,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 24, 2001
JAKARTA, Indonesia - When she was still something of a neophyte six years ago, Megawati Sukarnoputri spoke with wonder about the hard work of politics. The most difficult thing to learn, she said, was patience. "It's only human that I have ups and downs," she said then. "I've had to train myself to remain clear and detached in the face of problems." It is a surprising statement to read in retrospect. As every Indonesian now knows, patience is Megawati's trademark. Patience, as one ardent follower said, is her shining quality.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 11, 2000
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- In what appeared to be a serious new effort to prosecute former President Suharto, the government named him yesterday as a suspect in a widening corruption investigation and summoned him for questioning Monday. Suharto's lawyers immediately responded that he was too sick to attend. The former president is 78 and was hospitalized twice last year after a stroke. "He is physically and mentally unfit to appear for the questioning," said one of the lawyers, Juan Felix Tampubolon.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 15, 1998
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- Faced with a huge student protest and a wild outbreak of rioting and arson, President B. J. Habibie said yesterday that he would take "firm action" to curb what he called subversive movements that threaten the country's stability.On the day after soldiers killed at least eight demonstrators and wounded more than 100 others, tens of thousands of students and poor people filled a highway yesterday in front of the parliament building in what seemed to be an unfocused and unguided outpouring of discontent.
NEWS
June 2, 1998
B. J. HABIBIE, who became president of Indonesia for the next five years upon President Suharto's May 21 resignation, has given demonstrators more than he initially thought required.He has agreed to an election next year, without saying who would be eligible or how free the parties would be. His attorney general has launched an investigation into Suharto's legendary wealth and corruption, which might or might not be a whitewash.The election pledge has not appeased the opposition, which wants the tame legislative assembly to pick an interim president, untainted by Suhartoism, this summer.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 25, 1998
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- In a potential sign of greater openness after the fall of President Suharto, Indonesia moved yesterday toward the release of some political prisoners.Officials threw open the iron door of East Jakarta's Cipinang Prison and allowed reporters to freely interview inmates as family members and friends devoured cake and celebrated what they hoped might be a speedy release."This is extraordinary," said Colonel Latief, who has spent the past 32 years behind bars for his role in the slayings of six army generals in 1965 that led to Indonesia's "Year of Living Dangerously" and the rise of Suharto.
NEWS
By Carl T. Rowan | May 25, 1998
WASHINGTON -- President Suharto, the Indonesian strongman of 32 years, has just been driven from power by an army of little people protesting rising food prices. Thus, he has learned the age-old truism that a leader can steal and cheat and commit myriad other sins, but he dare not take food off the people's plates.Mr. Suharto and his family have been cheating Indonesians -- who make up the fourth most populous country on earth -- since the 1960s when they exploited wheat given in the U.S. Food for Peace Program.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 15, 1998
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- Faced with a huge student protest and a wild outbreak of rioting and arson, President B. J. Habibie said yesterday that he would take "firm action" to curb what he called subversive movements that threaten the country's stability.On the day after soldiers killed at least eight demonstrators and wounded more than 100 others, tens of thousands of students and poor people filled a highway yesterday in front of the parliament building in what seemed to be an unfocused and unguided outpouring of discontent.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 23, 1998
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- Soldiers and riot police stormed onto the grounds of Indonesia's parliamentary complex last night and forced 2,000 students to peacefully leave the national political symbol they had held this week as part of their successful quest to topple President Suharto.Waving flags and pumping their fists from atop public buses, the students retreated through the darkened streets of the capital before dawn in what seemed like a victory lap after helping end the reign of Asia's longest-serving leader.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 23, 1998
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- Soldiers and riot police stormed onto the grounds of Indonesia's parliamentary complex last night and forced 2,000 students to peacefully leave the national political symbol they had held this week as part of their successful quest to topple President Suharto.Waving flags and pumping their fists from atop public buses, the students retreated through the darkened streets of the capital before dawn in what seemed like a victory lap after helping end the reign of Asia's longest-serving leader.
NEWS
May 22, 1998
TOO LATE, General Suharto accepted the inevitable by resigning as president of Indonesia, after 32 years of personal rule. He elevated his protege, Vice President B. Jusuf Habibie, to serve out the remaining five years of the presidential term. That is not likely to happen.It was the old dictator's stubborn decision in March to make Mr. Habibie vice president that set off the final collapse of the rupiah and internal demonstrations demanding an end to the Suharto era. The calm departure of President Suharto is positive, but the Habibie presidency is not the answer -- a view domestic dissidents and world markets share.
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