Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPresident S Speech
IN THE NEWS

President S Speech

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 2, 1990
WASHINGTON -- President Bush's suggestion that Iraqi withdrawal from Kuwait offers the chance for a broader Mideast peace reflects administration officials' belief that the Persian Gulf crisis will end up strengthening those who want to resolve the Arab-Israeli conflict peacefully.Once Iraq has been forced out of Kuwait, they say, the path of aggression will have been shown to be a losing proposition. Moderate leaders, such as President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt, will be emboldened."If, in fact, Saddam Hussein has been forced to retreat and if the pathway that he embodies is clearly seen as being on the losing side, then those who favor reconciliation give us a possibility for pursuing peace," a senior State Department official said last week.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 12, 2009
Down with socialism! On Tuesday I took my children out of school so that they could watch the president's address live. I wanted them to see just how bad things have gotten in this country. I had to bring them home to see it since my local school system had acceded to the demands of right-thinking Americans to prevent presidents not named Bush from speaking to schoolchildren. The president encouraged them to do well in school. What nonsense! Socialist Obama is trying to turn this great country of ours into a socialist state.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | February 19, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Buoyed by overnight polls showing overwhelming support for President Clinton's economic plan, congressional Democrats began yesterday what is likely to be a marathon struggle to put aside their individual complaints to get something passed.Mr. Clinton apparently served his own cause well with an address Wednesday night that at least yesterday turned the tide of phone calls and polls in his favor.But as more details become known of the president's ambitious plan to increase taxes and cut spending, lawmakers expect that Mr. Clinton's sales job will get a whole lot tougher.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 21, 2004
WASHINGTON - President Bush put on full display last night the extraordinary political advantage wielded by a president who intends to seek a second term. Striding into the august setting of the U.S. Capitol to spirited applause and rapt attention, the president delivered a State of the Union address that was essentially a forceful case for his re-election this year. He never had to mention the campaign or utter the name of a single Democrat. For an incumbent, sounding unlike a politician - seeming to float above the bare-knuckled noise of squabbling candidates - is a time-tested political strategy.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and Nelson Schwartz and John B. O'Donnell and Nelson Schwartz,Washington Bureau | January 26, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Democrats in the Maryland congressional delegation lavished praise on President Clinton's speech while Republicans wondered how the ambitious agenda would be financed and criticized his threat to veto health care legislation."
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 20, 1999
WASHINGTON -- With the strain of impeachment hanging over the Capitol, Democrats as well as Republicans said they were overwhelmed by the barrage of new spending programs President Clinton arrayed before them last night."
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 21, 2004
WASHINGTON - President Bush put on full display last night the extraordinary political advantage wielded by a president who intends to seek a second term. Striding into the august setting of the U.S. Capitol to spirited applause and rapt attention, the president delivered a State of the Union address that was essentially a forceful case for his re-election this year. He never had to mention the campaign or utter the name of a single Democrat. For an incumbent, sounding unlike a politician - seeming to float above the bare-knuckled noise of squabbling candidates - is a time-tested political strategy.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 9, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Although the die apparently is cast for Congress to give President Bush authority to use whatever means he chooses to rid Iraq of weapons of mass destruction, debate in the Senate goes on over the wisdom of that action. This locking of the barn door after the horse has been stolen is the result of effective White House pressures on compliant congressional Republicans and a Democratic leadership more concerned with avoiding political damage in the November elections than about the extension of presidential power.
NEWS
By Peter Osterlundand Karen Hosler and Peter Osterlundand Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 29, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush will stand before the Congress and the nation tonight, sharing his views about the state of a union gripped by recession and embroiled in war.He is expected to dedicate most of his annual State of the Union address to a discussion of the latter, spending the rest of his time trying to ease the public's fear by minimizing the significance of the former.Beyond that, White House officials indicated that tonight's speech would be long on generalities and short on explicit prescriptions for the nation's economic ills.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 18, 2000
HANOI, Vietnam - President Clinton, who opposed U.S. intervention in Vietnam as a university student, addressed the students of a new Vietnam yesterday in a speech that emphasized the two nations' shared suffering in war and common interests in peace. In an address carried live on Vietnamese national television, Clinton tried to heal the wounds of a devastating conflict that left this country in tatters and his humiliated. In this authoritarian state, it was an unprecedented forum for a foreign leader - let alone one for a former foe. While noting both nations' past pain, the president spoke of how cooperation on trade and the search for soldiers who remain unaccounted for is helping move the two countries beyond a tortured relationship defined by the war. "The histories of our two nations are deeply intertwined in ways that are both a source of pain for generations that came before and a source of promise for generations yet to come," Clinton told a carefully selected audience of about 700 students and faculty at Vietnam National University.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 9, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Although the die apparently is cast for Congress to give President Bush authority to use whatever means he chooses to rid Iraq of weapons of mass destruction, debate in the Senate goes on over the wisdom of that action. This locking of the barn door after the horse has been stolen is the result of effective White House pressures on compliant congressional Republicans and a Democratic leadership more concerned with avoiding political damage in the November elections than about the extension of presidential power.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 18, 2000
HANOI, Vietnam - President Clinton, who opposed U.S. intervention in Vietnam as a university student, addressed the students of a new Vietnam yesterday in a speech that emphasized the two nations' shared suffering in war and common interests in peace. In an address carried live on Vietnamese national television, Clinton tried to heal the wounds of a devastating conflict that left this country in tatters and his humiliated. In this authoritarian state, it was an unprecedented forum for a foreign leader - let alone one for a former foe. While noting both nations' past pain, the president spoke of how cooperation on trade and the search for soldiers who remain unaccounted for is helping move the two countries beyond a tortured relationship defined by the war. "The histories of our two nations are deeply intertwined in ways that are both a source of pain for generations that came before and a source of promise for generations yet to come," Clinton told a carefully selected audience of about 700 students and faculty at Vietnam National University.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 20, 1999
WASHINGTON -- With the strain of impeachment hanging over the Capitol, Democrats as well as Republicans said they were overwhelmed by the barrage of new spending programs President Clinton arrayed before them last night."
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 29, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Judy Silas, a middle school principal in Jacksonville, Fla., listened Monday night as President Clinton argued his case for sending U.S. troops to Bosnia. But she heard something else. Something familiar. Something she said she heard three decades ago when her brother -- and some of the high school seniors she taught -- were sent off to war."I heard Clinton use the same arguments I heard when we were going into Vietnam," says Ms. Silas, who opposes the involvement of U.S. ground troops in the Bosnian peace effort.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | January 27, 1995
Washington -- To the Republican congressmen smirking and whispering to each other as President Clinton offered his endless State of the Union message, the speech must have sounded like the beginning of President Clinton's second term -- a two-year term followed by a new Republican beginning.There certainly was a gleam in New Jersey Gov. Christine Todd Whitman's eyes when she gave her punchy response to the president's speech and began by talking about Washington crossing the Delaware in 1776.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 25, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Republicans presented President Clinton on last night as a reluctant convert to the cause of a smaller, cheaper government more attuned to the needs of the middle class.Casting themselves as the authentic agents of change, the Republicans also suggested that Mr. Clinton's actions would not match his conservative words."While at times tonight some of the president's ideas sounded pretty Republican, the fact remains that he has been opposed to the balanced-budget amendment, he proposed even more government spending, and he imposed the biggest tax increase in American history," Gov. Christie Whitman of New Jersey said in remarks prepared for delivery on behalf of her party.
NEWS
September 12, 2009
Down with socialism! On Tuesday I took my children out of school so that they could watch the president's address live. I wanted them to see just how bad things have gotten in this country. I had to bring them home to see it since my local school system had acceded to the demands of right-thinking Americans to prevent presidents not named Bush from speaking to schoolchildren. The president encouraged them to do well in school. What nonsense! Socialist Obama is trying to turn this great country of ours into a socialist state.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 29, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Judy Silas, a middle school principal in Jacksonville, Fla., listened Monday night as President Clinton argued his case for sending U.S. troops to Bosnia. But she heard something else. Something familiar. Something she said she heard three decades ago when her brother -- and some of the high school seniors she taught -- were sent off to war."I heard Clinton use the same arguments I heard when we were going into Vietnam," says Ms. Silas, who opposes the involvement of U.S. ground troops in the Bosnian peace effort.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and Nelson Schwartz and John B. O'Donnell and Nelson Schwartz,Washington Bureau | January 26, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Democrats in the Maryland congressional delegation lavished praise on President Clinton's speech while Republicans wondered how the ambitious agenda would be financed and criticized his threat to veto health care legislation."
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | February 19, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Buoyed by overnight polls showing overwhelming support for President Clinton's economic plan, congressional Democrats began yesterday what is likely to be a marathon struggle to put aside their individual complaints to get something passed.Mr. Clinton apparently served his own cause well with an address Wednesday night that at least yesterday turned the tide of phone calls and polls in his favor.But as more details become known of the president's ambitious plan to increase taxes and cut spending, lawmakers expect that Mr. Clinton's sales job will get a whole lot tougher.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.