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June 12, 2001
Who's hot Steve Karsay of the Indians is the only pitcher in the majors with at least 35 innings who has not allowed a home run. Who's not The Braves, who had the fewest errors in the majors, committed four. Line of the day Rafael Palmeiro, Rangers first baseman AB ..... R ..... H ..... RBI ..... HR 5 ....... 2 ..... 3 ...... 2 ........ 2 On deck Curt Schilling of the Diamondbacks goes for his major-league-leading 11th win today, facing the Cubs. He said it "It's a chance of a lifetime.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 28, 2009
Six months ago, embarking on the vice presidency, Joe Biden listed among his top priorities "restoring" the office to its proper constitutional role in the wake of the eight-year tenure of predecessor Dick Cheney. It's early to attempt a reliable assessment of his achievement of that goal. But at the half-year mark, he has from all appearances made a good start, if only because nobody is suggesting, as often was the case with Mr. Cheney, that Mr. Biden is really running the country. Nor has there has been talk of the vice president stealthily at work from an "undisclosed location," whispering conspiratorially into the ear of the president.
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NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 20, 2002
DETROIT - Bill Clinton, looking fit and richly tailored, stepped nimbly from the wings at the rococo Fox Theatre in downtown Detroit. He nodded to the saxophonist as the stage band struck up his anthem ("Don't Stop Thinking About Tomorrow") and saluted a wildly enthusiastic throng of supporters. Then he stood silently as waves of whoops and applause broke over him. Clinton, the best campaigner of his generation, kept his distance from the 2000 campaign, sidelined by fears he would hurt the national ticket.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS and DAN RODRICKS,dan.rodricks@baltsun.com | January 13, 2009
Having watched political corruption cases in Maryland and elsewhere over 30 years, I can say this: Indictments are not predictable, but the reactions to them are. The reactions to the 12-count indictment against Mayor Sheila Dixon of Baltimore sound quite familiar. We've heard in the past few days what we always seem to hear: * Angry outrage-for-hire by a defense attorney, though, in this case, the live telecast of The Arnold Weiner Show (pre-empting Oprah on WBAL-TV) was something new. * Supporters of the accused, including other elected officials, ridiculing the charges with "That's all they've got?"
NEWS
By Richard Boudreaux and Richard Boudreaux,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 30, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Israeli President Moshe Katsav, clinging defiantly to his office two weeks after police recommended that he be indicted on rape charges, came under pressure yesterday from the country's top law enforcement official to step down. In a nonbinding brief to the Supreme Court, Attorney General Menachem Mazuz said that Katsav should suspend himself from his largely ceremonial post until the investigation is complete. He said he was concerned that Katsav's refusal to step aside was impeding the case, discouraging witnesses who work in the president's office from coming forward to testify.
NEWS
December 21, 2007
We know that puff of smoke coming from Vice President Dick Cheney's ceremonial office on Wednesday couldn't have been from the destruction of more CIA videotapes, because it turned out that even David S. Addington, his fearsome chief of staff, had counseled the spy agency three years ago to be cautious about destroying the tapes it had. When the man known as "Cheney's Cheney" is concerned about sticking to the law, you have to wonder who at the CIA thought...
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | February 3, 1993
A TV reporter shoved a microphone into my face last week and asked, "How do you think President Clinton is doing in his first two weeks?"I was reluctant to reply because I always write an in-depth piece on a president's first eight days. So I just said that his administration was an utter failure and President Clinton should resign and turn over the running of our country to the able Al Gore.Instead of the reporter leaving it at that, he kept pressing me as to why the president had failed to live up to the promise 43 percent of the country had for him.I responded, "His inexperience showed up as soon as he took of fice.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 24, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Israel's attorney general said yesterday that prosecutors have enough evidence to charge President Moshe Katsav with raping or sexually harassing female subordinates while serving in his current post and earlier as tourism minister. But Attorney General Menachem Mazuz said a decision on whether to issue a first-ever criminal indictment against an Israeli president would depend on the outcome of a hearing during which Katsav has the right to rebut the allegations. Mazuz said the hearing would be scheduled in coming days.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | July 1, 2007
When the City Council seems adrift and irrelevant, you wonder why the office of council president attracts talented candidates. Of course, the job title - president - has a ring to it. And you get various trappings: a nice office, a car and a council chamber podium above the fray. Oh, and it's been a launching pad for mayors.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2001
A tiara sits behind a glass door in the president's office at Western Maryland College - a girly, sparkly crown of rhinestones and pink plastic hearts. On a shelf next to it, wrapped in clear plastic, is the new black velvet tam with the gold tassel Joan Develin Coley will wear today when she is inaugurated as the Westminster college's eighth president. Coley seems slightly embarrassed about the tiara, one of the few personal effects in the otherwise bare office she has yet to make her own. Being a princess is not exactly the image she wants to convey as the first female president and the first person to rise through the ranks of the 134-year-old college from assistant professor to president.
NEWS
December 21, 2007
We know that puff of smoke coming from Vice President Dick Cheney's ceremonial office on Wednesday couldn't have been from the destruction of more CIA videotapes, because it turned out that even David S. Addington, his fearsome chief of staff, had counseled the spy agency three years ago to be cautious about destroying the tapes it had. When the man known as "Cheney's Cheney" is concerned about sticking to the law, you have to wonder who at the CIA thought...
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | July 1, 2007
When the City Council seems adrift and irrelevant, you wonder why the office of council president attracts talented candidates. Of course, the job title - president - has a ring to it. And you get various trappings: a nice office, a car and a council chamber podium above the fray. Oh, and it's been a launching pad for mayors.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 24, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Israel's attorney general said yesterday that prosecutors have enough evidence to charge President Moshe Katsav with raping or sexually harassing female subordinates while serving in his current post and earlier as tourism minister. But Attorney General Menachem Mazuz said a decision on whether to issue a first-ever criminal indictment against an Israeli president would depend on the outcome of a hearing during which Katsav has the right to rebut the allegations. Mazuz said the hearing would be scheduled in coming days.
NEWS
By Richard Boudreaux and Richard Boudreaux,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 30, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Israeli President Moshe Katsav, clinging defiantly to his office two weeks after police recommended that he be indicted on rape charges, came under pressure yesterday from the country's top law enforcement official to step down. In a nonbinding brief to the Supreme Court, Attorney General Menachem Mazuz said that Katsav should suspend himself from his largely ceremonial post until the investigation is complete. He said he was concerned that Katsav's refusal to step aside was impeding the case, discouraging witnesses who work in the president's office from coming forward to testify.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 19, 2006
In his first public declaration as acting president, Raul Castro said he has mobilized tens of thousands of reservists and militia to defend Cuba against a potential U.S. threat. "We could not rule out the risk of somebody going crazy, or even crazier, within the U.S. government," he said in an interview yesterday in the Communist Party newspaper Granma. Under the headline "No enemy can defeat us," the 75-year-old Cuban defense minister lambasted President Bush's efforts to derail a peaceful succession of power in Cuba and boasted that "absolute tranquillity is reigning in the country."
NEWS
By DOUG DONOVAN and DOUG DONOVAN,SUN REPORTER | February 7, 2006
Baltimore City Council President Sheila Dixon made a mistake by not disclosing that her sister works for a company that is regulated by city government, officials from the president's office said yesterday. An article in The Sun on Monday revealed that Dixon had not disclosed her sister's employment with fiber optic cable firm Utech, a minority subcontractor for Comcast of Baltimore, the city's cable provider. Baltimore's ethics laws require public officials to disclose whether siblings or other relatives work for companies that do business or are regulated by the city.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 19, 2006
In his first public declaration as acting president, Raul Castro said he has mobilized tens of thousands of reservists and militia to defend Cuba against a potential U.S. threat. "We could not rule out the risk of somebody going crazy, or even crazier, within the U.S. government," he said in an interview yesterday in the Communist Party newspaper Granma. Under the headline "No enemy can defeat us," the 75-year-old Cuban defense minister lambasted President Bush's efforts to derail a peaceful succession of power in Cuba and boasted that "absolute tranquillity is reigning in the country."
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS and DAN RODRICKS,dan.rodricks@baltsun.com | January 13, 2009
Having watched political corruption cases in Maryland and elsewhere over 30 years, I can say this: Indictments are not predictable, but the reactions to them are. The reactions to the 12-count indictment against Mayor Sheila Dixon of Baltimore sound quite familiar. We've heard in the past few days what we always seem to hear: * Angry outrage-for-hire by a defense attorney, though, in this case, the live telecast of The Arnold Weiner Show (pre-empting Oprah on WBAL-TV) was something new. * Supporters of the accused, including other elected officials, ridiculing the charges with "That's all they've got?"
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 20, 2002
DETROIT - Bill Clinton, looking fit and richly tailored, stepped nimbly from the wings at the rococo Fox Theatre in downtown Detroit. He nodded to the saxophonist as the stage band struck up his anthem ("Don't Stop Thinking About Tomorrow") and saluted a wildly enthusiastic throng of supporters. Then he stood silently as waves of whoops and applause broke over him. Clinton, the best campaigner of his generation, kept his distance from the 2000 campaign, sidelined by fears he would hurt the national ticket.
SPORTS
June 12, 2001
Who's hot Steve Karsay of the Indians is the only pitcher in the majors with at least 35 innings who has not allowed a home run. Who's not The Braves, who had the fewest errors in the majors, committed four. Line of the day Rafael Palmeiro, Rangers first baseman AB ..... R ..... H ..... RBI ..... HR 5 ....... 2 ..... 3 ...... 2 ........ 2 On deck Curt Schilling of the Diamondbacks goes for his major-league-leading 11th win today, facing the Cubs. He said it "It's a chance of a lifetime.
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