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By Robert Pear and Robert Pear,New York Times News Service | January 5, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In his budget request to Congress later this month, President Bush intends to propose tax credits to help people buy health insurance, further cuts in military spending and major new restrictions on the payment of government benefits to the affluent, administration officials say.Mr. Bush's advisers say the tax credits will be the centerpiece of his election-year strategy to show that he has a substantial domestic policy and to fend off attacks by Democrats who contend that he has no plan to aid the 34 million Americans who lack health insurance.
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NEWS
April 26, 2009
President Barack Obama is fast approaching completion of his first 100 days in office. He's run at a sprinter's pace, goaded by the urgent needs of an extraordinary economic crisis and the daunting issues of health care, strategic defense, budget and foreign policy. He made a few predictable rooky mistakes in choosing his team and discovered that achieving bipartisanship is going to be harder than he thought. But he deserves good grades for lifting the national mood at a time of crisis and energetically seeking answers to many of the nation's toughest problems.
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NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau | August 8, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton, described by aides as "giddy" in the wake of the 51-50 Senate vote to approve his economic package, made overtures yesterday to his Republican adversaries -- and indicated that his budget is just the beginning of an ambitious legislative agenda."
NEWS
By Mark Silva and Mark Silva,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 6, 2007
WASHINGTON -- President Bush, seeking $245 billion more for the nation's two wars at a time when Congress is challenging an escalation of U.S. military force in Iraq, proposed a $2.9 trillion federal budget yesterday that would significantly increase defense spending while restraining other areas of the government. The president's plan for 2008 is much like the budgets he has presented for the past six years, averting new taxes and limiting spending in many "discretionary" areas while boosting defense spending.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writer Tom Bowman contributed to this article | February 7, 1997
An article in yesterday's editions incorrectly characterized a proposed percentage that federal employees would contribute from their salaries to their retirement plans by 2001 to help balance the budget. The correct percentage is 0.5 percent.The Sun regrets the error.WASHINGTON -- Maryland appeared to be off to a good start in the opening round of this year's budget process, winning presidential support for several expensive state projects while apparently avoiding any deep fiscal cuts, according to analysts.
NEWS
March 1, 2001
NOT SINCE Minnesota's Hubert H. Humphrey, dubbed "the happy warrior" for his eternally sunny outlook, has Washington seen such boundless optimism as expressed by George W. Bush in his first formal address to Congress. We can have it all, the president told lawmakers. Protect Social Security. Fix Medicare. Build a missile defense system. Pump up spending on education. Add a prescription-drug program for seniors. Improve our national parks. Pay down the federal debt. Enact a $1.6 trillion tax cut. It was a constantly upbeat performance by the new president, who laid out his budget agenda in broad terms.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 6, 2004
WASHINGTON - President Bush's long-term budget plans include deep spending cuts in programs that he's promoting this year on the campaign trail as among his signature achievements. The president, for instance, trumpeted his "Jobs for the 21st Century" program during a speech in South Carolina yesterday. That program, which Bush said aids states and local communities, falls under funds for training and employment, which his budget proposes to increase by nearly $100 million for fiscal 2005.
NEWS
February 9, 2006
In a trend that must be confusing to many Americans, the president's budget proposal is increasingly detached from the reality of what the federal government actually spends. Despite all the attention given this week to President Bush's $2.77 trillion budget for 2007, it is at most a starting point for the debate, and more specifically a statement of Mr. Bush's priorities that even he does not expect to be approved intact. What that means, given the lack of any fiscal discipline in Washington, is that Mr. Bush is likely to get funding for most of his priorities, while Congress will restore money to programs and departments he has cut. The federal government doesn't have to balance its budget - and so it rarely does.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 18, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The House buried President Bush's new budget yesterday and adopted instead a $1.46 trillion Democratic plan that avoids tax increases while allocating more spending for education, housing, veterans' benefits and a variety of other social programs.Mr. Bush's proposal -- which included a $25 billion reduction in Medicare outlays over five years and an $11 billion cut in capital gains taxes primarily for wealthy Americans -- was crushed by a vote of 335-89. Eighty-eight Republicans backed the president, but 75 members of his own party deserted him on the roll call.
NEWS
By CAROL COX WAIT | February 4, 1992
Washington -- Record high deficits are the single most important problem facing economic policy makers today. In this election-recession year politicians unable to resist the siren song of tax cuts and pump-priming spending increases may make the deficit problem worse. In that context, the president's budget is a surprisingly responsible document.The budget does contain some creative accounting and blue smoke and mirrors. That is bad budget practice and bad politics. It is bad budget practice because everyone who wants deeper tax cuts or higher spending will adopt and expand the gimmicks in the budget to create the illusion such proposals won't increase the deficit.
NEWS
February 9, 2006
In a trend that must be confusing to many Americans, the president's budget proposal is increasingly detached from the reality of what the federal government actually spends. Despite all the attention given this week to President Bush's $2.77 trillion budget for 2007, it is at most a starting point for the debate, and more specifically a statement of Mr. Bush's priorities that even he does not expect to be approved intact. What that means, given the lack of any fiscal discipline in Washington, is that Mr. Bush is likely to get funding for most of his priorities, while Congress will restore money to programs and departments he has cut. The federal government doesn't have to balance its budget - and so it rarely does.
NEWS
February 18, 2005
PRESIDENT BUSH'S proposal to cut a community development program popular with the nation's mayors is a bad idea at a time when many mayors are struggling to create jobs, provide their residents with affordable housing and revitalize their cities. Cities and rural municipalities depend on Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds to pay for everything from community centers for the elderly to affordable housing developments for the working poor to adult literacy programs. The president's budget proposal to reduce federal funding for CDBG by $1.6 billion, nearly a third of the program's budget, is not a simple cutting, it's a major gutting.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 6, 2004
WASHINGTON - President Bush's long-term budget plans include deep spending cuts in programs that he's promoting this year on the campaign trail as among his signature achievements. The president, for instance, trumpeted his "Jobs for the 21st Century" program during a speech in South Carolina yesterday. That program, which Bush said aids states and local communities, falls under funds for training and employment, which his budget proposes to increase by nearly $100 million for fiscal 2005.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 26, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Senate dealt a setback to President Bush's economic agenda yesterday, voting to slash his $726 billion tax-cut plan by more than half, with Democrats joining Republican moderates in arguing that the nation could ill afford a tax cut as large as Bush wants. The unexpected action came just days after the Senate had defeated a similar effort to scale back Bush's proposed tax cut to $350 billion. The 51-48 vote occurred as the Senate prepared today to pass a $2.2 trillion budget for 2004 that projects deficits approaching $330 billion next year, without even accounting for the cost of the war in Iraq.
NEWS
March 1, 2001
NOT SINCE Minnesota's Hubert H. Humphrey, dubbed "the happy warrior" for his eternally sunny outlook, has Washington seen such boundless optimism as expressed by George W. Bush in his first formal address to Congress. We can have it all, the president told lawmakers. Protect Social Security. Fix Medicare. Build a missile defense system. Pump up spending on education. Add a prescription-drug program for seniors. Improve our national parks. Pay down the federal debt. Enact a $1.6 trillion tax cut. It was a constantly upbeat performance by the new president, who laid out his budget agenda in broad terms.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 8, 2000
WASHINGTON -- As his opening bid in this year's budget debate, President Clinton proposed yesterday a $1.84 trillion blueprint for government activism made possible by robust economic growth and a windfall of surplus tax revenue. Republicans leaders complained that Clinton's plan seemed to suggest every use for the budget surplus except to return it to taxpayers -- and they called it an election-year gambit to help Democrats in November. They pledged to block his most ambitious new proposals, though they could find it difficult to resist plans to boost spending on popular programs.
NEWS
April 26, 2009
President Barack Obama is fast approaching completion of his first 100 days in office. He's run at a sprinter's pace, goaded by the urgent needs of an extraordinary economic crisis and the daunting issues of health care, strategic defense, budget and foreign policy. He made a few predictable rooky mistakes in choosing his team and discovered that achieving bipartisanship is going to be harder than he thought. But he deserves good grades for lifting the national mood at a time of crisis and energetically seeking answers to many of the nation's toughest problems.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun Karen Hosler of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | February 7, 1995
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton formally submitted a $1.61 trillion budget to Congress yesterday that essentially tosses the tough fiscal choices ahead into the laps of the new Republican Congress."
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 2, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The applause line in President Clinton's State of the Union address brought down the House -- but only one side of the House.When Clinton said Tuesday that the federal budget would soon be balanced in large part because of "the courageous vote in 1993 that led to a cut in the deficit of 90 percent," Democrats went wild. Republicans sat in stony silence.The reaction spoke volumes about the political pain and pride that has brought the nation to a semblance of fiscal health for the first time in a generation.
NEWS
February 12, 1997
JUST THREE DAYS before Valentine's Day, Republican leaders staged a love-in for President Clinton on Capitol Hill yesterday. They ignored nasty areas of disagreement, such as campaign reform and the harsh treatment of legal immigrants, to focus on five goals for which there supposedly is general accord: welfare-to-work proposals, federal aid to education, juvenile justice, help for the District of Columbia and tax reduction -- all in the context of a...
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