Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPresident Ronald Reagan
IN THE NEWS

President Ronald Reagan

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
June 11, 2004
The stock market is closed today in observance of a national day of mourning for former President Ronald Reagan. Weekend tables appear in today's editions.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By THE DENVER POST | January 30, 2008
They are in a no-win position. The Army is not big enough to support the surge, deal with Afghanistan and give people a minimum amount of time at home."
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 12, 2004
No tables U.S. stock and bond markets were closed yesterday in observance of a national day of mourning for former President Ronald Reagan. No stock tables appear today.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | July 6, 2005
ARLINGTON, Va. - When President Ronald Reagan nominated Arizona's Sandra Day O'Connor to the Supreme Court in 1981, conservatives were nervous because little was known about her. Mr. Reagan assured religious conservatives they had nothing to fear. He told the Rev. Jerry Falwell he had spoken to her about abortion, which was the main concern of religious conservatives, and found her to be OK on that issue. He assured Mr. Falwell and company they would not be disappointed. What I had seen of Ms. O'Connor's record did not persuade me she would favor restricting abortion.
NEWS
June 9, 2004
When the plane carrying former President Ronald Reagan's casket touches down at Andrews Air Force Base today, the nation will witness a ritual ceremony shaped by years of military tradition and regulation. Not since Lyndon B. Johnson's death in 1973 has a presidential funeral cortege marched in the streets of Washington. Here's a look at some key elements of the state funeral.
NEWS
By THE DENVER POST | January 30, 2008
They are in a no-win position. The Army is not big enough to support the surge, deal with Afghanistan and give people a minimum amount of time at home."
NEWS
By Maureen Dowd and Maureen Dowd,New York Times News Service | April 7, 1991
Of all the fictions perpetrated in American politics, perhap one of the most absurd is that first ladies have no power. They might occasionally weigh in on personnel issues, the nation is assured, but they would never meddle in policy.But a new book, "Nancy Reagan, the Unauthorized Biography," by Kitty Kelley, could forever shatter that myth and add allegations of scandalous sexual behavior to the folklore of the Reagan era.Beyond the adoring gaze, Ms. Kelley asserts, Nancy Reagan, or "Mrs.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | October 30, 1992
This is the 52nd presidential election.In the 50th in 1984, Democrats nominated a woman for the ticket, a first for a major party. She was New York Rep. Geraldine Ferraro. Presidential nominee Walter Mondale, who had been Jimmy Carter's vice president, chose her as his running mate in a gesture to the growing women's vote, but some voters interpreted it as symbolic of his party's subservience to special-interest groups, the National Organization for Women having pressured him to so act.Republicans renominated President Ronald Reagan, whose tax cuts had contributed to an economic boom (but growing deficits)
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 4, 1991
Nearly three years after leaving the Oval Office, the man many considered the most successful U.S. politician of his era is regarded as no better than average, a Los Angeles Times Poll has found.People still rate President Ronald Reagan's job performance positively, but not overwhelmingly so. And as the "great communicator" has slipped from public view, the public's overall impression of him also has slipped. In fact, people are closely divided over whether they and the nation are better or worse off because of the 40th president's policies, the poll showed.
NEWS
By Laura Ingraham | April 13, 1997
Americans are more cynical than ever about politicians, believing that the conduct of the Clinton administration is no different from any other presidency in recent memory.Yet even a cursory examination of the record of President Clinton compared with that of President Ronald Reagan, the other recent two-termer, leads to the comforting conclusion that not all politicians are created equal. Consider:* Administration's guiding principles.Reagan: limited government, a strong defense, encouraging democratic movements abroad.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2004
No tables U.S. stock and bond markets were closed yesterday in observance of a national day of mourning for former President Ronald Reagan. No stock tables appear today.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2004
The stock market is closed today in observance of a national day of mourning for former President Ronald Reagan. Weekend tables appear in today's editions.
NEWS
June 9, 2004
When the plane carrying former President Ronald Reagan's casket touches down at Andrews Air Force Base today, the nation will witness a ritual ceremony shaped by years of military tradition and regulation. Not since Lyndon B. Johnson's death in 1973 has a presidential funeral cortege marched in the streets of Washington. Here's a look at some key elements of the state funeral.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 8, 2004
SIMI VALLEY, Calif. - They came in blue jeans and old cut-off shorts. They wore somber black suits and Korean War-era uniforms. They were from central California, Massachusetts and the suburbs of Maryland. Yesterday, busloads of mourners poured into the presidential library where the body of former President Ronald Reagan lay, beginning a week of mourning from coast to coast. "I thought it was a moving experience. We loved him as a president," said Ron Ahlquist, 61, of Tewksbury, Mass.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2004
WASHINGTON - When Nancy Reagan emerges as a widow in mourning this week, she will do so with the nation's empathy - the kind of public embrace that at times eluded her during her years in the White House. She has become known to the country as a caregiver of the first order, devoted to Ronald Reagan during the long siege with Alzheimer's disease that led to his death over the weekend. Since the former first lady left the White House, the depictions of a woman with an iron will have given way to something far more reverent.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 6, 2004
As an actor, Ronald Reagan never worked for the director he often quoted when he was president: Frank Capra, whose philosophy of action-packed charity in Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936) reflected, in Reagan's mind, his administration's economic policies. But Reagan's own big-screen presence as a genial, unpretentious and capable guy - a presence he transferred with more seasoned authority to the small screen as the host (and occasional star) of TV's General Electric Theatre and Death Valley Days - fit the image he wanted people to have of his kind of America.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 13, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Three top Reagan administration officials responsible for tracking the cases of servicemen missing in Vietnam said yesterday that the government has known for nearly 20 years that some U.S. prisoners of war may have been alive in Indochina when troops were withdrawn in 1973.But in testimony to the Senate Select Committee on POW-MIA Affairs the three officials expressed doubts that any prisoners remained alive in captivity now, though some servicemen may have stayed behind of their own volition and could account for some if not all of the live sightings of people identified as Americans in recent years.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 8, 2004
SIMI VALLEY, Calif. - They came in blue jeans and old cut-off shorts. They wore somber black suits and Korean War-era uniforms. They were from central California, Massachusetts and the suburbs of Maryland. Yesterday, busloads of mourners poured into the presidential library where the body of former President Ronald Reagan lay, beginning a week of mourning from coast to coast. "I thought it was a moving experience. We loved him as a president," said Ron Ahlquist, 61, of Tewksbury, Mass.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 6, 2004
WASHINGTON - Reaction from around the globe to Ronald Reagan's passing yesterday was emotional and swift. Foreign leaders and Americans, especially those who knew and worked with the former president - whether or not they stood by his policies - saluted him for infusing hope in people, for believing deeply in the strength of country and for helping draw a curtain on the Cold War era. President Bush led the nation in mourning Reagan's death in brief remarks...
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 6, 2004
WASHINGTON - Once, after a news conference, Ronald Reagan returned to the Oval Office where his senior advisers were waiting to tell him he had gone too far in flatly ruling out a tax increase. He needed to leave himself some "wiggle room," they said, so he would have space to maneuver in the congressional battle then looming. Silently fuming, Reagan heard them out. One of the aides drafted a short statement backing off slightly from what the president had just told reporters. Reagan grabbed the paper from the aide and snatched a pen from his desk so fiercely that the inkstand went flying.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.