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By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 4, 1997
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Jerry Richardson, coach of the notorious Mandela United Football Club, told the Truth and Reconciliation Commission yesterday that Winnie Madikizela-Mandela ordered all the murders and assaults he committed."
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NEWS
June 26, 2002
Lionel "Rusty" Bernstein, 82, a white anti-apartheid activist who stood trial for sabotage with former South African President Nelson Mandela, died Sunday in Oxford, England, from what appeared to be a massive heart attack. Mr. Bernstein was one of 16 activists, including Mr. Mandela, charged in 1963 with sabotage and the attempted overthrow of the South African government. In the so-called Rivonia Trial, the defendants used the courtroom to put the apartheid state on trial. Mr. Bernstein was later acquitted after spending the year of the trial in prison.
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NEWS
October 6, 1994
Army commander Raoul Cedras and Brigadier-General Phillip Biamby presided over a military funeral in Port-au-Prince for 10 Haitians killed by U.S. marines in a shootout in the northern city of Cap-Haitian Sept. 24. Cedras repeatedly buried his face in his hand during the service.Defense Secretary William Perry expressed surprise that there's not been more violence in Haiti since U.S. troops entered the country three weeks ago.South African President Nelson Mandela will meet with Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide in Washington today and press him to heal, not aggravate, Haiti's bloody divisions.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2001
COLLEGE PARK - Former South African President Nelson Mandela reiterated his support for the war in Afghanistan in a speech last night at the University of Maryland but also urged that the United States end the war soon, invest more in the United Nations and not assume it is superior to the Muslim world. Delivering the annual Anwar Sadat Lecture for Peace to an audience of more than 10,000 people packing Cole Field House, the Nobel Peace Prize laureate said the U.S. military action is justified by the "terrible audacity" and "cold-blooded efficiency" of the terrorist attacks Sept.
NEWS
June 22, 1995
Emile M. Cioran, 84, a Romanian-born writer and philosopher fascinated by the bleak themes of emptiness and death, died Tuesday in Paris. Two of his best-known works were "The Inconvenience of Being Born" and "On the Peaks of Despair."Harry Gwala, 74, a militant leader of the African National Congress who fought for years against rival Zulus, died Tuesday in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. A Communist and 50-year veteran of the ANC, he was in prison with South African President Nelson Mandela.
NEWS
June 26, 2002
Lionel "Rusty" Bernstein, 82, a white anti-apartheid activist who stood trial for sabotage with former South African President Nelson Mandela, died Sunday in Oxford, England, from what appeared to be a massive heart attack. Mr. Bernstein was one of 16 activists, including Mr. Mandela, charged in 1963 with sabotage and the attempted overthrow of the South African government. In the so-called Rivonia Trial, the defendants used the courtroom to put the apartheid state on trial. Mr. Bernstein was later acquitted after spending the year of the trial in prison.
NEWS
November 24, 1996
THE LOVE AFFAIR between South African President Nelson Mandela and the country's media outlets, which are mostly controlled by the white minority, seems to be over. In recent weeks, the 78-year-old president has repeatedly attacked the press and has charged that senior black journalists were being used by conservative owners of white newspapers to undermine the African National Congress government.Mr. Mandela first became irritated toward the media after Lillian Arrison, one of his secretaries, agreed to be photographed nude for Hustler magazine and revealed she liked sex, particularly in the shower.
NEWS
By Asahi News Service | October 31, 1990
TOKYO -- African National Congress Vice President Nelson Mandela called the $1.8 million monetary contribution of the Japanese government toward the improvement of life in South Africa "absolutely insignificant" yesterday and asked for further support from the government and citizens."
NEWS
June 9, 1997
John Wesley Joice, 65, a police officer turned barkeeper whose Lion's Head bar in Greenwich Village in New York City drew a wide-ranging clientele of the literate and the literary, died of lung cancer Friday at his home on Sheridan Square, across the street from the Lion's Head. The pub closed last year, two years after rising rents forced him to give up his stake in it.He opened the Lion's Head in 1966. Among those who liked to drop by were writers Norman Mailer and Pete Hamill, poet Joel Oppenheimer, comedian Jackie Mason, actors Bill Murray and William Hurt, and former Mayors Edward I. Koch and David N. Dinkins.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 16, 1999
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, implicated last year in apartheid-era killings, kidnappings and torture, was named yesterday as one of the ruling African National Congress' top 10 candidates for this year's election. The former wife of President Nelson Mandela was listed ninth among 200 party candidates for the national legislature. Her high ranking provoked speculation here that she could be in line for a Cabinet position in the country's second black majority government.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 18, 1999
PRETORIA, South Africa -- President Thabo Mbeki appointed a down-to-business Cabinet yesterday, shuffling some portfolios and leaving others in the hands of key ministers from the administration of former President Nelson Mandela."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 6, 1999
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- President Nelson Mandela, a key player in the handover of the two Lockerbie bombing suspects by Libyan leader Muammar el Kadafi, said yesterday that the transfer justified what some here have called his "pariah" foreign policy.Mandela has taken widespread criticism for the close relations he has maintained during his five years in power with Third World dictators who supported the struggle by his African National Congress party during the apartheid era.Among the "pariah" leaders he has kept close contact with are Kadafi, Cuban President Fidel Castro and Iraq's Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 16, 1999
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, implicated last year in apartheid-era killings, kidnappings and torture, was named yesterday as one of the ruling African National Congress' top 10 candidates for this year's election. The former wife of President Nelson Mandela was listed ninth among 200 party candidates for the national legislature. Her high ranking provoked speculation here that she could be in line for a Cabinet position in the country's second black majority government.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 24, 1999
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The 1993 Nobel Peace Prize given to President Nelson Mandela and his predecessor, F. W. de Klerk, recognized a partnership that brought peace and democracy to a country blighted by apartheid.But the smiles of the country's first black president and its previous white one as they received their joint honor in Stockholm belied a relationship that had soured.They made their separate ways to Sweden for the award ceremony, and de Klerk observes: "Before my arrival, he had chosen once again to attack me in interviews he had given to the media.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 7, 1998
CAPE TOWN, South Africa - Opening a new session of this nation's first democratic Parliament with a blend of old pomp and new priorities, President Nelson Mandela pledged his government yesterday to continuing change aimed primarily at benefiting the neediest."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 21, 1997
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The post-Mandela era opened here yesterday with a shift in political priorities from reconciliation of this racially divided society to its economic transformation to benefit the poor.Thabo Mbeki, successor to President Nelson Mandela as leader of the ruling African National Congress and heir apparent to the state presidency in 1999, used his keynote speech to the party's national conference to set the agenda for taking the country into the next millennium."We are the ANC," he said, "because we are committed to the reduction of poverty and can never say our work is done while, with our own eyes, we see the suffering of the rural masses and the blight of the squatter camps that surround our towns and our cities."
NEWS
June 5, 1994
President Nelson Mandela's first major address to South Africa's parliament set forth a vision of a unified society of equals in which "No more should words like kaffirs, hottentots, coolies, boy, girl and baas be part of our vocabulary."And he also set forth a spending program marked by restraint, deficit curtailment, encouragement to investment and reduced expectations for enriching the impoverished masses.A program starting at $700 million or 3 percent of the 1994-5 budget was included for housing, electricity, water and sewage systems, education and health services in the townships, with health services especially for all young children and pregnant women.
NEWS
July 9, 1997
THREE YEARS AFTER President Nelson Mandela led South Africa to the end of white apartheid rule, his African National Congress is encountering internal tensions that question its belief in non-racialism.Trade unions charge the government is not moving fast enough to close the huge wealth disparity among various racial groups. Meanwhile, black political critics say the Mandela government is like a coconut -- "black on the outside and super-white on the inside."These frictions are likely to mount as Mr. Mandela's retirement in two years draws closer.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 17, 1997
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- President Nelson Mandela left his ruling African National Congress yesterday with a warning that opposition parties would unite in the next general election in an attempt to defeat the country's first black majority government and maintain white privilege here."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 15, 1997
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- President Nelson Mandela warned one of his white predecessors, P. W. Botha, yesterday that "the law must take its course" if the former prime minister and president continues to refuse to testify before the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.Botha, 81, has rejected two subpoenas from the panel. If he remains defiant, he could be sentenced to a fine and imprisonment for contempt. Such a humiliation of a white conservative would reverberate in an Afrikaner community already feeling victimized and marginalized by the ruling black majority.
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