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By The Miami Herald | September 27, 1991
ISRAELI Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir has some traits in common with President George Bush. They are both hardheaded men.Their heedless game of chicken is also putting the U.S.-Israeli "special relationship" under enormous strain at a time when it should be moving harmoniously in a common purpose.Bush could show more flexibility regarding $10 billion in loan guarantees so that Israel can absorb an expected one million Soviet immigrants. Bush entreated Congress to delay considering the request for 120 days.
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NEWS
By CNN | December 23, 2010
Authorities detained a person near the home of former President George W. Bush on Wednesday night after an incident in his Dallas-area neighborhood, a U.S. Secret Service spokesman said. The person who was detained was coming to visit a neighbor of the former president, according to Ed Donovan of the Secret Service. The person was authorized to come onto the street, Donovan said. The incident is being investigated by the Secret Service and there was no perceived threat to the former president, according to Sgt. Warren Mitchell with the Dallas Police Department.
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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | November 13, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The nation's Roman Catholic bishops are warning President George Bush it would be immoral to launch an immediate attack on Iraq.The Persian Gulf crisis dominated yesterday's opening session of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops, where many said they feared the world was teetering on the brink of war. The bishops were so deeply concerned that they are likely to issue an even tougher warning to Bush before they adjourn on Thursday."
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 21, 2007
CRAWFORD, Texas -- Perhaps not since Herbert Hoover took issue with the blame heaped on him for the Great Depression by Franklin D. Roosevelt have two presidents or their spokesmen feuded quite so publicly - and angrily - as former President Jimmy Carter and President Bush. Yesterday, the White House fired a new salvo. Carter kicked off the war of words by declaring that Bush's tenure in the White House was "the worst in history" in terms of international relations. Bush spokesman Tony Fratto, who had shrugged off the comment Saturday, decided to return fire.
NEWS
September 19, 1990
State's Attorney Thomas Hickman got a high-powered start on the general election campaign the day after the primary when he met President George Bush and U.S. Attorney General Richard Thornburgh.Hickman was asked to come to the Justice Department, along with 50 other state and federal law enforcement officials, to have lunch with Thornburgh and discuss pending legislation.After lunch the guests were taken to the Rose Garden at the White House, where Bush shook hands with the group after a speech on criminal justice issues.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | November 2, 1992
This is the 52nd presidential election.The 51st in 1988 produced President George Bush. The then vice president was nominated after a brief, spirited contest with Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole.Democrats nominated Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis. A liberal in the party's best tradition, he told the public the election was about competence, not ideology. Mr. Bush insisted it was about values and political philosophy. He attacked Mr. Dukakis for not being sufficiently patriotic and for being too lenient on criminals.
NEWS
May 6, 1991
President George Bush's energetic and ebullient natural manner is generally so reassuring that often it is hard to remember that he is, after all, nearing 67 years of age.His sudden attack of irregular heartbeat late Saturday underscores this fact, and for a time it appeared the condition might be serious enough to warrant an electroshock procedure that would require relinquishment of the presidency, if only for a few hours, to Vice President Dan Quayle....
NEWS
By Miami Herald | September 20, 1991
ISRAELI PRIME Minister Yitzhak Shamir has some traits in common with President George Bush. They are both hardheaded men.Their stubbornness has become a hindrance to progress in the quest for lasting peace between Israel and its Arab neighbors.Their heedless game of chicken is also putting the U.S.-Israeli "special relationship" under enormous strain at a time when it should be moving harmoniously in a common purpose.President Bush could show more flexibility in his posture regarding $10 billion in loan guarantees so that Israel can absorb an expected one million Soviet immigrants.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 23, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President George Bush's beloved points of light did not all go out when he did.In fact, the non-partisan Points of Light Foundation, which embodied Mr. Bush's national service campaign, has expanded and is developing a working relationship with the Clinton administration."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | January 8, 1992
They're calling it the flu, but the illness that struck President George Bush today was more likely a stomach virus transmitted by a food handler who failed to use proper bathroom hygiene, a Maryland public health official said today."
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 2, 2005
WASHINGTON - When President Bush traces the ruinous path of Hurricane Katrina by air and ground today, he'll see a disaster measured in thousands of victims, miles of floodwater and piles of rubble. What could take longer to assess is the impact the storm has had on his presidency during a time of war, rising gasoline prices and sagging poll numbers. For now, though, Bush is in crisis-management mode. He called Congress back to Washington, to pump $10.5 billion more into the government's burgeoning recovery effort.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 21, 2005
WASHINGTON - President Bush launched his second term, as anticipated, with lofty words. What was surprising was the subject his often-graceful language addressed. Brushing lightly past his ambitious domestic agenda, he unexpectedly devoted his second inaugural address largely to the question of America's role in the world. His outward-looking remarks included a potentially far-reaching redefinition of the country's interests. Declaring it "the urgent requirement of our nation's security," Bush said that America will use its "considerable" power to align itself with forces of freedom against dictators and oppressive governments around the world.
NEWS
January 21, 2005
Vice President Cheney, Mr. Chief Justice, President Carter, President Bush, President Clinton, members of the United States Congress, reverend clergy, distinguished guests, fellow citizens: On this day, prescribed by law and marked by ceremony, we celebrate the durable wisdom of our Constitution and recall the deep commitments that unite our country. I am grateful for the honor of this hour, mindful of the consequential times in which we live and determined to fulfill the oath that I have sworn and you have witnessed.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2005
Laura Bush's gown - an ice blue and silver vision by Oscar de la Renta - took the first lady from her usual prim and proper appearance to one that was shimmery and glamorous. The first twins' gowns, both Badgley Mischka creations, were movie-star extravagant and as snug as security in the nation's capital, but much sexier. It was an extremely tasteful and stylish show for the throngs celebrating George W. Bush's re-election. As the Bushes dashed from swearing-in ceremony to parade to a string of formal galas during yesterday's inauguration festivities, freedom and fashion both took a stand.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 21, 2005
WASHINGTON - At the Commander-in-Chief Ball - the only one of last night's nine inaugural balls specifically in honor of the military - the strains of "God Bless America" snapped guests to attention, acronyms made up the cocktail chatter and most of the names that were dropped belonged to aircraft carriers. This was a crowd that didn't know how to answer when asked where they were from - military bases here and there - but knew exactly what to say when asked about their feelings on terrorism and the war in Iraq.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 21, 2005
WASHINGTON - On his second Inauguration Day, President Bush presented himself as a serious, confident leader, but also as a man able to laugh at a joke. At times, President Bush projected the air of gravity that seemed appropriate for a day that coincided with more bloodshed in Iraq and continued recovery efforts in tsunami-ravaged South Asia. As he walked the corridors of the U.S. Capitol, on his way to deliver his inaugural address from steps overlooking the Mall, he looked stern, eyes focused, lips pursed.
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland | August 19, 2001
Maybe Columbian John Passmore will get a footnote in horseshoe history - the man who turned "No. 43," a flipper of some note, into a turner, thus better equipped to beat No. 41 at his own game. Which would add zest to the competitive families of former President George Bush, the nation's 41st chief executive, and his son George W. Bush - "No. 43," as Passmore says the president is referred to among White House functionaries. Passmore should know. He worked for the White House communications agency until a couple of years ago, which is partly why he got called this summer to give George W. a private pitching lesson.
NEWS
August 14, 2000
THE PARTY in power in peace and good times is no more assured of staying there than former President George Bush proved to be in 1992. However boring political commentators found it, however frustrated Republicans were at networks' unwillingness to give them unlimited infommercial time, the convention in Philadelphia was a resounding success. It sent George W. Bush and Dick Cheney off with more than the predicted bounce. Now the nation must cope with the mirror image in Los Angeles. Will demonstrators be more outrageous to get noticed?
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 21, 2005
Delivering the oath of office in a voice hoarse from cancer treatments, a frail-looking Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist symbolized yesterday what could become the biggest battle in President Bush's second term - the looming possibility of a partisan fight over vacancies on the Supreme Court. The president's inauguration marked Rehnquist's first public appearance since October, when he began treatments for thyroid cancer. Rehnquist, 80, leaned heavily on a cane, and the tube from his tracheotomy surgery was visible at the loose collar of his signature judicial robe, its distinctive four gold stripes on each sleeve.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2005
ARLINGTON, Va. - Inauguration night is a fabulous time when the Who's Who of Washington put on their ballroom best and dance the night away, all gussied-up and fussed-over, looking good, smelling sweet and feeling hopeful. But before the Who's Who can shake and shimmy their way into the bright future that lies ahead, many find they have something else to get right first: That darn bow tie. "I only wear a bow tie once every four years," says Michael Brown, a Bush appointee at the Environmental Protection Agency, who was on his way to the Independence Ball, but needed Nordstrom's menswear clothing manager Jack Eggleston to help him with his patterned bow tie. "I just haven't mastered how to tie one."
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