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President Francois Mitterrand

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By Bernard D. Kaplan and Bernard D. Kaplan,Hearst News Service | September 8, 1994
PARIS -- All of France is intrigued by why President Francois Mitterrand cooperated in the writing of a new book that describes how he faithfully served the wartime Vichy government and remained friendly afterward with some of that pro-Nazi regime's most unsavory characters.The book, "A French Youth," lifts the veil on Mr. Mitterrand's World War II years. It details his role as a Vichy official so devoted to its chief, Marshal Philippe Petain, that he was awarded a high decoration attesting to his loyalty.
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FEATURES
February 7, 2002
Today in history: Feb. 7 In 1812, author Charles Dickens was born in Portsmouth, England. In 1931, aviator Amelia Earhart married publisher George P. Putnam in Noank, Conn. In 1936, President Franklin Roosevelt authorized a flag for the office of the vice president. In 1943, the government announced that shoe rationing would go into effect, limiting consumers to buying three pairs per person for the remainder of the year. In 1944, during World War II, the Germans launched a counteroffensive at Anzio, Italy.
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FEATURES
February 7, 2002
Today in history: Feb. 7 In 1812, author Charles Dickens was born in Portsmouth, England. In 1931, aviator Amelia Earhart married publisher George P. Putnam in Noank, Conn. In 1936, President Franklin Roosevelt authorized a flag for the office of the vice president. In 1943, the government announced that shoe rationing would go into effect, limiting consumers to buying three pairs per person for the remainder of the year. In 1944, during World War II, the Germans launched a counteroffensive at Anzio, Italy.
NEWS
September 15, 1994
A FEW years ago when Austrian Chancellor Kurt Waldheim's Nazi past was exposed, the former United Nations secretary general's first response was denial. When that didn't work, he tried to discredit his accusers, and when the uproar continued he adopted a stance of proud defiance.Now comes French President Francois Mitterrand, whose collaboration with his country's Nazi-dominated Vichy government during World War II is the subject of two new books due out this fall.Rather than deny his past, Mr. Mitterrand went out of his way to cooperate with one of the books' authors and publicly acknowledged his ties to right-wing political groups in the years leading up to the war.Mr.
NEWS
September 15, 1994
A FEW years ago when Austrian Chancellor Kurt Waldheim's Nazi past was exposed, the former United Nations secretary general's first response was denial. When that didn't work, he tried to discredit his accusers, and when the uproar continued he adopted a stance of proud defiance.Now comes French President Francois Mitterrand, whose collaboration with his country's Nazi-dominated Vichy government during World War II is the subject of two new books due out this fall.Rather than deny his past, Mr. Mitterrand went out of his way to cooperate with one of the books' authors and publicly acknowledged his ties to right-wing political groups in the years leading up to the war.Mr.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 29, 1990
PARIS -- With the Soviet Union apparently frustrated in its latest effort to persuade Iraq to withdraw from Kuwait, President Mikhail S. Gorbachev met yesterday with President Francois Mitterrand on France's ideas for ending the Persian Gulf crisis.The main purpose of Mr. Gorbachev's 24-hour visit here is to sign a friendship and cooperation agreement with France, but the two leaders immediately turned to the gulf crisis when they held their first talks at the Elysee Palace, French officials said.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Paris Bureau of The Sun | November 14, 1990
PARIS -- President Bush will probably use his visit here next week to sound out French President Francois Mitterrand on the circumstances under which France would support a military offensive to force Iraq out of Kuwait, a senior diplomatic source here said.Mr. Bush will be in Paris with the leaders of 32 European nations and Canada for the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe.The source said that Secretary of State James A. Baker III concluded last week's eight-nation tour without clear assurances that Paris would support a U.N. Security Council resolution authorizing the use of force against Iraq.
NEWS
April 2, 1993
The new center-right government of France is likely to be as prickly in international economic affairs as past French governments, only more so. It will probably be more adamant in protection of inefficient French farmers, because of rightist roots in the countryside. It will be more troublesome to Washington on trade, less tolerant of a rational European Community farm policy, more demanding of Germany in European monetary affairs.Once again, as a result of the parliamentary election concluded Sunday, France will experience the "co-habitation" of a Socialist president and conservative cabinet.
NEWS
May 20, 1991
When the Socialist president of France ousts the Socialist prime minister for another one, it is not a revolution. President Francois Mitterrand unloaded the moderate Michel Rocard, who moved the regime to the center to reflect the election returns of 1988 and won legislative majorities, but who seeks to succeed Mr. Mitterrand in the presidential election of 1995 and is increasingly a rival. Detaching himself from a government of dwindling popularity is not bad politics for Mr. Rocard, whose campaign is free to start today.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Paris Bureau of The Sun | February 25, 1991
PARIS -- France basked in the success of its front-line ground assault into Iraq yesterday, with French President Francois Mitterrand enjoying record public support for his decision to join American-led forces in ground combat.In one of the most rapid public opinion polls ever prepared here, nearly four out of five French people approved the start of ground combat after Iraq failed to pull out of Kuwait by the Saturday deadline, and 43 percent said that war should not end until Saddam Hussein was out of power.
NEWS
By Bernard D. Kaplan and Bernard D. Kaplan,Hearst News Service | September 8, 1994
PARIS -- All of France is intrigued by why President Francois Mitterrand cooperated in the writing of a new book that describes how he faithfully served the wartime Vichy government and remained friendly afterward with some of that pro-Nazi regime's most unsavory characters.The book, "A French Youth," lifts the veil on Mr. Mitterrand's World War II years. It details his role as a Vichy official so devoted to its chief, Marshal Philippe Petain, that he was awarded a high decoration attesting to his loyalty.
NEWS
April 2, 1993
The new center-right government of France is likely to be as prickly in international economic affairs as past French governments, only more so. It will probably be more adamant in protection of inefficient French farmers, because of rightist roots in the countryside. It will be more troublesome to Washington on trade, less tolerant of a rational European Community farm policy, more demanding of Germany in European monetary affairs.Once again, as a result of the parliamentary election concluded Sunday, France will experience the "co-habitation" of a Socialist president and conservative cabinet.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | July 6, 1992
WHEN the French do something daring, at least they do it right! French President Francois Mitterrand traveled into the serpent's mouth of stricken Sarajevo, giving us the example of a grand gesture in an ambivalent world, and also showing he knew history.He made that dangerous trip on June 28, you see, which is the exact date in 1914, 78 years ago, when a fanatic Bosnian Serb assassinated the Hapsburg heir apparent, Archduke Francis Ferdinand, thus effectively beginning the havoc of World War I.And what a difference between President Mitterrand's daring trip -- landing in Sarajevo, actually going into the bombarded city and symbolically identifying himself with the suffering of its innocent people -- and the cowardly self-righteousness of the rest of the West toward the destruction of Yugoslavia.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,Los Angeles Times | June 29, 1992
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- French President Francois Mitterrand staged a daring visit to embattled Sarajevo yesterday and vowed to break a Serbian blockade threatening the city's 300,000 trapped citizens with starvation.Hours later, Serbian forces relinquished control of Sarajevo's shattered airport to United Nations peacekeepers so it can be reopened for humanitarian relief flights, the Tanjug news agency reported.The first such flights, two French air force transport planes, each loaded with 6.5 tons of food and medicine, landed last night in Split on Croatia's Adriatic coast and planned to fly into the ravaged capital of Bosnia-Herzegovina this morning.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | February 6, 1992
Paris -- The most interesting aspect of the terrorist George Habash's Paris adventure last week was the eagerness of Western governments to have nothing to do with this supposedly most-wanted of international terrorists. Sic transit ignominia mundi.Certainly the French did not want him, once they had discovered that they did have him, and they sent him away with haste and embarrassment. But Israel did not want him either.When it became known that Mr. Habash was in Paris for medical treatment, Israel's embassy spoke of Israel's issuing an international warrant for his arrest.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | October 24, 1991
Paris -- For many years it seemed that the truth about what went on in France was that it wasn't what the French said was going on. Pessimism was fundamental to the serious Frenchman's political stance, thus it was essential for him to deplore the economic and industrial performance of his country and scoff at the allegedly ill-informed admiration of France by foreigners.West Germany and the United States were held to possess the sobriety, diligence and quality of performance France could never hope to match.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | February 6, 1992
Paris -- The most interesting aspect of the terrorist George Habash's Paris adventure last week was the eagerness of Western governments to have nothing to do with this supposedly most-wanted of international terrorists. Sic transit ignominia mundi.Certainly the French did not want him, once they had discovered that they did have him, and they sent him away with haste and embarrassment. But Israel did not want him either.When it became known that Mr. Habash was in Paris for medical treatment, Israel's embassy spoke of Israel's issuing an international warrant for his arrest.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 15, 1991
TROIS ILETS, Martinique -- Following their staunch and solid cooperation during the Persian Gulf war, the United States and France returned yesterday to prewar disagreements over how to achieve a lasting peace in the Middle East.President Bush flew to this Caribbean resort island at the request of French President Francois Mitterrand to discuss Mr. Bush's renewed drive to find a solution to the Arab-Israeli conflict.But after about three hours of talks at a lush mountain plantation, the two leaders still did not see eye-to-eye on such issues as creation of a Palestinian state, an international conference on the Middle East, a summit of the five leading members of the United Nations Security Council or a continuing role for coalition forces in southern Iraq.
NEWS
May 20, 1991
When the Socialist president of France ousts the Socialist prime minister for another one, it is not a revolution. President Francois Mitterrand unloaded the moderate Michel Rocard, who moved the regime to the center to reflect the election returns of 1988 and won legislative majorities, but who seeks to succeed Mr. Mitterrand in the presidential election of 1995 and is increasingly a rival. Detaching himself from a government of dwindling popularity is not bad politics for Mr. Rocard, whose campaign is free to start today.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 15, 1991
TROIS ILETS, Martinique -- Following their staunch and solid cooperation during the Persian Gulf war, the United States and France returned yesterday to prewar disagreements over how to achieve a lasting peace in the Middle East.President Bush flew to this Caribbean resort island at the request of French President Francois Mitterrand to discuss Mr. Bush's renewed drive to find a solution to the Arab-Israeli conflict.But after about three hours of talks at a lush mountain plantation, the two leaders still did not see eye-to-eye on such issues as creation of a Palestinian state, an international conference on the Middle East, a summit of the five leading members of the United Nations Security Council or a continuing role for coalition forces in southern Iraq.
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