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President Ernesto Zedillo

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NEWS
December 29, 1997
GUNMEN who invaded the village of Acteal in southern Mexico and murdered 45 Tzotzil Indians last Monday, wounded the hopes for democracy and rule of law in Mexico. The reform administration of President Ernesto Zedillo is back to Square One in attempts to restore the credibility of Mexican institutions.There has been corruption of police and the army in fighting narco-terrorism, political murders at the highest level, stolen elections, a currency crisis impoverishing millions and now this.
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NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 13, 1998
MEXICO CITY -- With his donkey "Shorty" as his ride and companion, 86-year-old Pedro Jasso Bravo walked for 28 days from northern Mexico to Mexico City to talk with President Ernesto Zedillo.He came to ask Zedillo for help in resolving a land dispute in his native state of San Luis Potosi. Almost nine months later, he is still waiting."I don't know why he won't talk to me," said Jasso. "He won't even answer my requests."With each passing day, though, as Jasso waits for a response in the heart of downtown Mexico City with his black, 13-year-old donkey their celebrity grows.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 27, 1996
MEXICO CITY -- Mexico took a major step toward dismantling its authoritarian political system yesterday, after its president and leaders of its four largest parties agreed to sweeping electoral reforms.The new measures dilute the Mexican president's near-absolute authority. They loosen the long-ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party's (PRI) grip on power. And they open elections to Mexicans living abroad -- millions of new voters, who, analysts said, are prone to vote against the PRI.President Ernesto Zedillo enshrined the reforms in a bill that the parties drafted and that he sent to the House of Deputies yesterday.
NEWS
December 29, 1997
GUNMEN who invaded the village of Acteal in southern Mexico and murdered 45 Tzotzil Indians last Monday, wounded the hopes for democracy and rule of law in Mexico. The reform administration of President Ernesto Zedillo is back to Square One in attempts to restore the credibility of Mexican institutions.There has been corruption of police and the army in fighting narco-terrorism, political murders at the highest level, stolen elections, a currency crisis impoverishing millions and now this.
NEWS
February 14, 1995
President Ernesto Zedillo put his shaken authority over Mexico on the line with a dramatic reversal of policy on the Zapatista National Liberation Army rebels of Chiapas state. Instead of continuing fruitless negotiation, he publicly ordered the arrest of six Zapatista leaders known by nom de guerre.The first reaction was humiliating defeat of his ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) candidate in gubernatorial elections Sunday in the western state of Jalisco, which includes Mexico's second city, Guadalajara.
NEWS
December 7, 1995
ONE YEAR AFTER his triumphant departure from office turned into a nightmare of humiliation, former Mexican President Carlos Salinas has launched a campaign for vindication that has instantly increased his country's political turmoil. Murder and money, corruption and conspiracy, even a contest between rival economic theories -- all these figure into a Salinas offer to return from self-exile to face justice and, by implication, meet smear with smear, scandal with scandal.His threat, his open break with a predecessor, is a distinct departure from the closed-circle traditions by which his party has held power since 1929.
NEWS
September 8, 1996
PRESIDENT ERNESTO ZEDILLO proclaimed to the Mexican people in his second annual state-of-the-nation speech last Sunday "that thanks to the efforts of all Mexicans, the country has overcome the economic emergency stage and clearly begun a recuperation." Perhaps.Direct foreign investment in plants is down but foreign purchase of Mexican securities is up. Of $12.5 billion lent by the U.S. Treasury to save Mexico after the collapse of the peso in January 1995, some $9 billion is repaid, surpassing expectations.
NEWS
September 3, 1997
THE MEXICAN Congress passed its first test for multi-party democracy on Monday when the ruling Party of Revolutionary Institutions (PRI) took part as a minority even though it has the most seats of any one party. It was on the verge of holding its own rump session, threatening political chaos, when President Ernesto Zedillo convinced his followers to play the game by the rules.A four-party coalition built on the right-wing National Action Party (PAN) and left-wing Party of Democratic Revolution (PRD)
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 13, 1998
MEXICO CITY -- With his donkey "Shorty" as his ride and companion, 86-year-old Pedro Jasso Bravo walked for 28 days from northern Mexico to Mexico City to talk with President Ernesto Zedillo.He came to ask Zedillo for help in resolving a land dispute in his native state of San Luis Potosi. Almost nine months later, he is still waiting."I don't know why he won't talk to me," said Jasso. "He won't even answer my requests."With each passing day, though, as Jasso waits for a response in the heart of downtown Mexico City with his black, 13-year-old donkey their celebrity grows.
NEWS
October 10, 1995
MEXICO'S PRESIDENT Ernesto Zedillo, who is to meet President Clinton today to confirm their common interest in upholding the North American Free Trade Agreement, believes one has to distinguish between "fog" and "long vision" in assessing the U.S.-Mexican relationship.With Pat Buchanan, Dick Gephardt, Ross Perot and organized labor singing from the same hymnal, NAFTA is under attack. Its vulnerability lies not in the terms of the treaty, a good deal for both countries; rather, it lies in the short-term collapse of the Mexican economy last December that has curtailed Mexico's ability to buy U.S. goods and services.
NEWS
September 3, 1997
THE MEXICAN Congress passed its first test for multi-party democracy on Monday when the ruling Party of Revolutionary Institutions (PRI) took part as a minority even though it has the most seats of any one party. It was on the verge of holding its own rump session, threatening political chaos, when President Ernesto Zedillo convinced his followers to play the game by the rules.A four-party coalition built on the right-wing National Action Party (PAN) and left-wing Party of Democratic Revolution (PRD)
NEWS
By Sam Quinones and Sam Quinones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 28, 1997
MEXICO CITY -- On Jan. 15, Mexico paid off the last of $20 billion in loans from the United States, money offered in 1995 when the Mexican peso and its economy nearly collapsed. Both President Clinton and Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo were all smiles, because the loan was repaid early.Indeed, from some vantage points -- the Mexican stock market or government statistics that show the return of foreign investment -- the economy is regaining its health: "I'm seeing quite a bit of optimism," says John Smith, president of Smith Search.
NEWS
September 8, 1996
PRESIDENT ERNESTO ZEDILLO proclaimed to the Mexican people in his second annual state-of-the-nation speech last Sunday "that thanks to the efforts of all Mexicans, the country has overcome the economic emergency stage and clearly begun a recuperation." Perhaps.Direct foreign investment in plants is down but foreign purchase of Mexican securities is up. Of $12.5 billion lent by the U.S. Treasury to save Mexico after the collapse of the peso in January 1995, some $9 billion is repaid, surpassing expectations.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 27, 1996
MEXICO CITY -- Mexico took a major step toward dismantling its authoritarian political system yesterday, after its president and leaders of its four largest parties agreed to sweeping electoral reforms.The new measures dilute the Mexican president's near-absolute authority. They loosen the long-ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party's (PRI) grip on power. And they open elections to Mexicans living abroad -- millions of new voters, who, analysts said, are prone to vote against the PRI.President Ernesto Zedillo enshrined the reforms in a bill that the parties drafted and that he sent to the House of Deputies yesterday.
NEWS
December 7, 1995
ONE YEAR AFTER his triumphant departure from office turned into a nightmare of humiliation, former Mexican President Carlos Salinas has launched a campaign for vindication that has instantly increased his country's political turmoil. Murder and money, corruption and conspiracy, even a contest between rival economic theories -- all these figure into a Salinas offer to return from self-exile to face justice and, by implication, meet smear with smear, scandal with scandal.His threat, his open break with a predecessor, is a distinct departure from the closed-circle traditions by which his party has held power since 1929.
NEWS
October 10, 1995
MEXICO'S PRESIDENT Ernesto Zedillo, who is to meet President Clinton today to confirm their common interest in upholding the North American Free Trade Agreement, believes one has to distinguish between "fog" and "long vision" in assessing the U.S.-Mexican relationship.With Pat Buchanan, Dick Gephardt, Ross Perot and organized labor singing from the same hymnal, NAFTA is under attack. Its vulnerability lies not in the terms of the treaty, a good deal for both countries; rather, it lies in the short-term collapse of the Mexican economy last December that has curtailed Mexico's ability to buy U.S. goods and services.
NEWS
March 14, 1995
What is happening in these times in the upper reaches of power in Mexico can rightly be described as tragedy. A president lauded not too long ago as the most innovative and successful in decades is today in exile, his brother charged with complicity in the murder of the former husband of his sister, his successor bitterly estranged, investigations continuing into the assassination of his first choice for the presidency, the economy in shambles and armed...
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | December 30, 1994
MEXICO CITY -- President Ernesto Zedillo Ponce de Leon moved to take control of Mexico's economic crisis yesterday by outlining an emergency plan to stabilize the economy and announcing the resignation of the finance minister who oversaw the devaluation of the peso that led to the collapse of the government's economic strategy.Breaking a public silence that had lasted for five days and confounded investors, Mr. Zedillo told a national television audience of a plan "in which everyone will have to do their part and no one will be exempt from sacrifice."
NEWS
March 14, 1995
What is happening in these times in the upper reaches of power in Mexico can rightly be described as tragedy. A president lauded not too long ago as the most innovative and successful in decades is today in exile, his brother charged with complicity in the murder of the former husband of his sister, his successor bitterly estranged, investigations continuing into the assassination of his first choice for the presidency, the economy in shambles and armed...
NEWS
February 14, 1995
President Ernesto Zedillo put his shaken authority over Mexico on the line with a dramatic reversal of policy on the Zapatista National Liberation Army rebels of Chiapas state. Instead of continuing fruitless negotiation, he publicly ordered the arrest of six Zapatista leaders known by nom de guerre.The first reaction was humiliating defeat of his ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) candidate in gubernatorial elections Sunday in the western state of Jalisco, which includes Mexico's second city, Guadalajara.
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