Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPresident Clinton
IN THE NEWS

President Clinton

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
NEWS
January 5, 1999
PRESIDENT Clinton should deliver the State of the Union address to Congress on time Jan. 19. If members are too embarrassed to invite Mr. Clinton to the Capitol, he can send it on paper as did 19th century presidents. Then there's nothing to stop him from addressing the American public on television.The worst idea yet came from senators of both parties who said Mr. Clinton should delay his speech, so as not to mingle with them while under impeachment.Nonsense. President Clinton has been good about carrying out duties while under a cloud.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 9, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In an incumbent-friendly year when most members of Congress could cruise to re-election, House Republican leaders are on a collision course with President Clinton over the only task they must get done: passing spending bills to keep the government running.White House officials and congressional Republicans are positioning themselves to blame each other if their confrontation threatens a government shutdown shortly before the election.The White House says the conflict centers on controversial policy changes wedged into spending bills, from restrictions on the 2000 Census and family planning to global warming and public housing.
NEWS
By MARK MATTHEWS and MARK MATTHEWS,Mark Matthews is the diplomatic correspondent in the Washington bureau of The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 1993
Washington -- When Henry Kissinger was in the Nixon White House, he remarked that he didn't have time to think; he had to act on the basis of thinking already done.President Clinton's advisers don't even have that luxury. So sweeping and swift are post-Cold War changes that they have had to readjust their thinking on the run.This week, they caught their breath long enough to explain their overall direction in a series of speeches building up to President Clinton's first address to the United Nations General Assembly tomorrow.
NEWS
February 9, 1999
THE PEOPLE need to know how their senators vote on the proposed removal of President Clinton from office, and why. Senators are not mere jurors but judges. The verdict is the most public part of a trial that must be wholly transparent.The secrecy imposed in 1868 on the impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson was unprecedented then, and does not bind senators today.Should the conclusion of the current trial be kept secret -- and then subject to leaks -- the Senate would join the House of Representatives in travesty.
NEWS
February 4, 1999
THE SENATE'S preoccupation with its appearance keeps it looking bad. Whether President Clinton committed high crimes seems to matter less to senators. The self-suggested Feb. 12 deadline for wrapping up the trial is artificial. So is the proposal to permit token live witnesses. If the Senate is serious about removing the president from office, the deadline and squeamishness about testimony would deny the nation justice. The trial, then, should run as long as needed for fairness.
NEWS
April 30, 1999
SERBIA'S dictator Slobodan Milosevic could take no comfort from the NATO summit, which displayed unanimous resolve for the bombing campaign to reverse his depopulation of Kosovo. He got it instead from the U.S. House of Representatives' muddled voting Wednesday.The House defeated, on a 213-213 tie, a resolution passed by the Senate endorsing the purpose of the bombing. It voted 249-180 against paying for a ground operation unless the president obtains congressional approval (as he had already promised)
NEWS
January 27, 1998
Lewinsky faked letter for college friend, paper saysPORTLAND, Ore. -- While attending Lewis & Clark College in Oregon, Monica Lewinsky allegedly used school stationery to write a phony letter to help someone she knew continue receiving unemployment benefits, the Oregonian reported Sunday, quoting an unidentified source.A college spokeswoman, Jean Kempe-Ware, said the school encouraged an employee who kept a copy of the document to turn it over to the Whitewater prosecutor, Kenneth W. Starr.
NEWS
May 31, 1994
Congressman Roscoe G. Bartlett of Maryland's Sixth Congressional District can take pride in at least one accomplishment during his first term: No White House official will ever again fly a government helicopter to play a round of golf. Thanks in part to the Western Maryland congressman's dedication to eradicating government waste, President Clinton last week summarily dismissed his long-time friend David Watkins from his position as White House director of administration.Mr. Watkins made the mistake of using the presidential helicopter to fly to Holly Hills Country Club near New Market.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | March 2, 1993
THE problem with President Clinton's economic plans is that they have no sex in them. It's impossible for you to follow the daily adventures of the deficit, the budget and growth of the economy without falling asleep.How can we make the economy more interesting? By treating it as a sex scandal.From the New York Post:WASHINGTON -- An anonymous source in the capital announced today that members of the Clinton administration abused the military budget to the tune of $100 billion. When senators told the administration personnel to stop making lewd remarks to the Stealth bomber proponents, the administration replied that they weren't abusing anybody, and the White House had the right to proposition the armed forces in any manner it saw fit.No charges have been brought against the Clinton people, but an ethics committee is conducting an investigation and will decide whether the $100 billion hug could be considered government or private business.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | September 19, 1994
WHEN CHRISTOPHER Columbus first laid eyes on the island of Hispaniola (now Haiti and the Dominican Republic), he wrote in his ship's log that it was the most beautiful spot in God's creation.It has been downhill since. The original inhabitants of the island were wiped out, probably by the European diseases Columbus' sailors carried. (For the multiculturalists among my readership, it should also be added that the exchange of diseases went both ways. Venereal diseases native to the new world were probably carried back to Europe by Columbus' men -- where they wreaked havoc.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.