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By New York Times News Service | October 4, 1993
MEXICO CITY -- President Carlos Salinas de Gortari yesterday announced a complex plan to raise Mexican wages and bolster the nation's economy. His proposals address United States concerns about American jobs displaced by cheap Mexican labor and lay the groundwork for the 1994 presidential election campaign.At a ceremony in Los Pinos, the Mexican White House, Salinas said the complex package of economic measures would allow Mexico to "harvest and use the advantages" it earned in five years of fiscal discipline.
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NEWS
December 7, 1995
ONE YEAR AFTER his triumphant departure from office turned into a nightmare of humiliation, former Mexican President Carlos Salinas has launched a campaign for vindication that has instantly increased his country's political turmoil. Murder and money, corruption and conspiracy, even a contest between rival economic theories -- all these figure into a Salinas offer to return from self-exile to face justice and, by implication, meet smear with smear, scandal with scandal.His threat, his open break with a predecessor, is a distinct departure from the closed-circle traditions by which his party has held power since 1929.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 4, 1995
MEXICO CITY -- The political drama that has gripped Mexico since the arrest of a brother of former President Carlos Salinas de Gortari veered toward farce yesterday as Mr. Salinas went on a hunger strike to rescue his "honor" and then suspended it hours later.Mr. Salinas, who left office three months ago as one of the most powerful Mexican leaders of the past century, told reporters who followed him to a poor neighborhood in the northern city of Monterrey that his protest had nothing to do with the arrest of his brother, Raul, on murder charges.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 13, 1995
MEXICO CITY -- With his elder brother jailed on murder charges and his once-celebrated reputation in tatters, former President Carlos Salinas de Gortari has left Mexico for virtual exile in the United States, senior government officials said yesterday.The officials said that Mr. Salinas, who ruled until Dec. 1, 1994, and was considered one of Mexico's strongest and most innovative leaders, was asked Tuesday to leave the country by an emissary of the man he chose to succeed him, President Ernesto Zedillo.
NEWS
December 7, 1995
ONE YEAR AFTER his triumphant departure from office turned into a nightmare of humiliation, former Mexican President Carlos Salinas has launched a campaign for vindication that has instantly increased his country's political turmoil. Murder and money, corruption and conspiracy, even a contest between rival economic theories -- all these figure into a Salinas offer to return from self-exile to face justice and, by implication, meet smear with smear, scandal with scandal.His threat, his open break with a predecessor, is a distinct departure from the closed-circle traditions by which his party has held power since 1929.
NEWS
August 17, 1991
The success of President Carlos Salinas de Gortari in bringing a modern economy and democracy to Mexico rides on tomorrow's midterm election. The actual outcome of the votes for the lower house of the National Congress, half the upper house and six state governorships is not so important. What matters is the perception of honesty in the count.Mr. Salinas leads the Party of Revolutionary Institutions (PRI) which has governed without serious challenge for 62 years. He was elected to the single six-year term in 1988, in an election that many observers thought the left-wing opponent, Cuauhtemoc Cardenas, had won. The left and right opposition won nearly half the congressional seats.
NEWS
December 5, 1993
Bolstered by U.S. congressional passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement, Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari has moved promptly to assure continuity of policies that have opened up its traditionally closed economy. His hand-picked candidate to succeed him after elections next year is Luis Donaldo Colosio, a political ally so close to Mr. Salinas that Mexicans often refer to him as the president's "son."Mr. Colosio managed Mr. Salinas' fraud-tainted victory in the 1988 election, then went on to run the party that has ruled Mexico since 1929 and head the social development agency.
NEWS
March 30, 1994
Mexico's desperate need for stability following the assassination of its president-apparent has impelled its ruling party to designate Ernesto Zedillo as its candidate in the Aug. 21 elections. As an unabashed protege of President Carlos Salinas, the 42-year-old Zedillo will be welcomed by an international investment fraternity that has rejoiced in the opening of the Mexican economy and ratification of the North American Free Trade Agreement.Whether he will be welcomed by the Mexican electorate will be the stuff of political speculation for months to come.
NEWS
September 11, 1991
It is possible to achieve free market economic growth before political democracy. The four tigers of the Pacific -- South Korea, Taiwan, Singapore and Hong Kong -- did. Economic liberalism then creates pressure for comparable political reform. President Carlos Salinas de Gortari is trying to emulate the Pacific Rim countries in Mexico. But where a political class smothers reform, a political change is needed first. Russia is a good example of that. Mexico may prove to be another.Secretary of State James A. Baker III gave the U.S. seal of approval on the Salinas priorities, at the annual binational meeting of ministers in Mexico City.
NEWS
August 17, 1994
For Americans as well as Mexicans, Sunday's elections in our neighbor beyond the Rio Grande can be described without hyperbole as the most important of the century. Sixty-five years of uninterrupted rule by the Institutional Revolutionary Party -- the famous PRI -- are likely to be extended with a victory for Ernesto Zedillo, a 42-year-old U.S.-educated technocrat who is a disciple of incumbent President Carlos Salinas. But under what circumstances? And with what impact on Mexico's democracy, economy and relationship with the United States?
NEWS
By JAMES BOCK | March 5, 1995
Mexico's ruling party has held power for 66 years by following unwritten rules, including: Never criticize the president in public, even if you're a former president. Never put a former president's relatives in prison, even if you're the current president.Those rules were broken last week. Former President Carlos Salinas de Gortari said publicly that, in effect, President Ernesto Zedillo had made a mess of devaluing the Mexican peso in December, touching off a financial panic.And President Zedillo threw Mr. Salinas' brother, Raul, into a maximum-security prison as having masterminded the assassination last September of the ruling party's No. 2 official.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 4, 1995
MEXICO CITY -- The political drama that has gripped Mexico since the arrest of a brother of former President Carlos Salinas de Gortari veered toward farce yesterday as Mr. Salinas went on a hunger strike to rescue his "honor" and then suspended it hours later.Mr. Salinas, who left office three months ago as one of the most powerful Mexican leaders of the past century, told reporters who followed him to a poor neighborhood in the northern city of Monterrey that his protest had nothing to do with the arrest of his brother, Raul, on murder charges.
NEWS
August 17, 1994
For Americans as well as Mexicans, Sunday's elections in our neighbor beyond the Rio Grande can be described without hyperbole as the most important of the century. Sixty-five years of uninterrupted rule by the Institutional Revolutionary Party -- the famous PRI -- are likely to be extended with a victory for Ernesto Zedillo, a 42-year-old U.S.-educated technocrat who is a disciple of incumbent President Carlos Salinas. But under what circumstances? And with what impact on Mexico's democracy, economy and relationship with the United States?
NEWS
March 30, 1994
Mexico's desperate need for stability following the assassination of its president-apparent has impelled its ruling party to designate Ernesto Zedillo as its candidate in the Aug. 21 elections. As an unabashed protege of President Carlos Salinas, the 42-year-old Zedillo will be welcomed by an international investment fraternity that has rejoiced in the opening of the Mexican economy and ratification of the North American Free Trade Agreement.Whether he will be welcomed by the Mexican electorate will be the stuff of political speculation for months to come.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,Staff Writer | January 15, 1994
SAN CRISTOBAL DE LAS CASAS, Mexico -- The stellar political career of Manuel Camacho Solis seemed doomed last month when Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari passed over his old college friend in the selection of a successor.But as a rebel uprising pushed this country dangerously close to explosion, the president has once again turned to Mr. Camacho for salvation.The popular former mayor of Mexico City may be the only one who can restore the image Mr. Salinas was trying to create of a country finally making its way out of historic corruption, indifference and class warfare.
NEWS
December 5, 1993
Bolstered by U.S. congressional passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement, Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari has moved promptly to assure continuity of policies that have opened up its traditionally closed economy. His hand-picked candidate to succeed him after elections next year is Luis Donaldo Colosio, a political ally so close to Mr. Salinas that Mexicans often refer to him as the president's "son."Mr. Colosio managed Mr. Salinas' fraud-tainted victory in the 1988 election, then went on to run the party that has ruled Mexico since 1929 and head the social development agency.
NEWS
November 7, 1993
Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari, probably the best friend the United States ever had south of the Rio Grande, is preparing his people for possible rejection of the North American Free Trade Agreement by a feckless U.S. Congress.Knowing full well that such a rebuff will only inflame traditional Mexican resentment toward the gringos, Mr. Salinas is asserting national pride while downgrading the importance of a treaty he had hoped would be capstone of his presidency."We have no desire to be like others," he acidly commented in his final state of the nation speech, "or to share their deficiencies."
NEWS
By John M. McClintock and John M. McClintock,Mexico City Bureau | February 18, 1992
MEXICO CITY -- Officials close to President Carlos Salinas de Gortari are trying to find a way to kill Mexico's most sacred political cow -- the constitutional provision that limits presidents to a single six-year term.The officials are working on a change in the constitution that would allow the 43-year-old president to run for re-election and serve as long as 14 years.Their view is that a single six-year term is not enough time for Mr. Salinas to complete his ambitious goals, especially the rejuvenation of an economy that seeks salvation in a free-trade agreement with the United States and Canada.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,Mexico City Bureau | November 18, 1993
MEXICO CITY -- Mexicans were jubilant yesterday as the U.S. Congress moved to adopt the North American Free Trade Agreement."There's a real sense of triumph," said Denise Dresser, a Mexican political scientist at the Autonomous Technological Institute of Mexico. "It's like riding the crest of a wave.""It could be quite dangerous because signing NAFTA is by no means a blank check for Mexico's future," she said. "There are still many problems ahead and NAFTA is not the answer for all of them."
NEWS
November 7, 1993
Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari, probably the best friend the United States ever had south of the Rio Grande, is preparing his people for possible rejection of the North American Free Trade Agreement by a feckless U.S. Congress.Knowing full well that such a rebuff will only inflame traditional Mexican resentment toward the gringos, Mr. Salinas is asserting national pride while downgrading the importance of a treaty he had hoped would be capstone of his presidency."We have no desire to be like others," he acidly commented in his final state of the nation speech, "or to share their deficiencies."
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