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NEWS
July 2, 2000
"There is one area where the teaching research is definitive: The best way to teach childre to read is phonics. No new theory or method has ever improved on it." -- Gov. George W. Bush, speaking to members of the Latin Business association in Los angeles, about school reform and student achievment "We should test new elementary school teachers...as a part of a national crusade to ensure that every child can read independently and well by the end of the third grade." -- Vice President Al Gore, in remarks prepared for delivery to the Michigan Education Association in Lansing
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun Reporter | May 29, 2008
Bernice Frances Margolet, who dealt in French and Asian antiques for nearly six decades, most of the time in her family-owned Howard Street business, died Saturday of heart disease at her Guilford home. She was 86. Known variously as Bernice, Bern, Frances or Margo, she often wore a French-style beret that became her fashion signature. "She had wonderful taste and a great, great eye," said P. Raab Christ hilf, director of fine art at Alex Cooper Auctioneers. "I bought from her; my grandmother bought from her."
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NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | July 12, 1996
Vice President Al Gore attended a Democratic National Committee fund-raiser last night at the Tindeco Wharf apartment complex in Canton in Southeast Baltimore.About 30 people attended the event, which was sponsored by C. William Struever, president of Struever Bros. Eccles & Rouse, a Baltimore development firm.Gore arrived at the four-story brick apartment building about 7 p.m. His motorcade was accompanied by about a dozen city police officers on motorcycles.Among those attending the event were Maryland Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, sporting a Clinton-Gore campaign button, and Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, an enthusiastic ++ supporter of President Clinton.
NEWS
By JULES WITCOVER | June 11, 2006
Former vice president is no General ShermanWASHINGTON -- Nobody has done more to bring Civil War Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman back into the news lately than former Vice President Al Gore, simply by saying he's not going to repeat the general's famous rejection of interest in the presidency. On the ABC News talk show last Sunday, Gore said he has "no plans" to run in 2008 and doesn't "expect to ever be a candidate for president again," but that he sees no reason to voice Sherman's observation that, "if nominated I will not run; if elected I will not serve."
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1995
Tipper Gore said in Baltimore yesterday that states are not ready to run programs that serve people with mental disorders, although impending federal Medicaid reform would give them control over those programs.In an interview with reporters at the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy's national conference, Mrs. Gore, the wife of Vice President Al Gore, said she has been meeting with panels of state health officials to discuss how states would administer block grant programs for health care.
NEWS
July 29, 1998
"What makes our democracy strong is not only what Congress may enact or a president may achieve. Even more, it is the quiet courage and uncommon bravery of Americans like J.J. Chestnut and John Gibson, and indeed every one of the 81 police officers who just this year have given their lives to ensure our domestic tranquillity."- President Clinton"As much as any soldier who ever landed on a beach, last week, the gatekeepers of our Capitol became the front-line guardians of our freedom."- Vice President Al Gore"At the top of this dome is a statue.
NEWS
December 15, 2000
Pro-Gore letters again underscore The Sun's bias On Dec. 14, the very day after Vice President Al Gore conceded and called for the nation to come together, I was appalled to see The Sun print so many letters promoting divisiveness by writers blindly loyal to the Democratic Party. President-elect George W. Bush was elected by the people; those who voted for him were not bribed with cigarettes, stirred up by race-baiting reverends or misinformed by the pro-Gore media. I will not be surprised when Mr. Bush is inaugurated for his second term in 2005.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 31, 2000
WASHINGTON - Eight current or former Secret Service agents who are black charged yesterday that top officials are dragging their feet on ridding the agency of deep-rooted racial discrimination, which they said has also infected Vice President Al Gore's protective detail. The group, part of the 38 black agents who have filed sworn declarations in federal court, appealed to Gore for help in getting the service to sit down with them to discuss a class-action lawsuit they and others filed in May. "These problems go back 27 years and more," said John P. Relman, an attorney representing the agents.
NEWS
March 28, 1997
AS VICE PRESIDENT Al Gore concludes his awkward visit to China, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (of all agencies) holds the key to American-Chinese relations and, perhaps, to Mr. Gore's political future. Under a cloak of secrecy that has irritated President Clinton, the FBI is probing explosive charges that Beijing might have attempted to influence U.S. foreign policy by contributing to the money-hungry Democratic Party during the 1996 elections. It was an issue that cast its shadow on the most important diplomatic foray of the vice president's career.
NEWS
October 11, 1999
WHEN HE played basketball for the New York Knickerbockers, Bill Bradley prevailed with a superior sense of positioning, an attribute memorialized in a book by John McPhee called "A Sense of Where You Are."By dint of arduous practice and a feel for the flow of a game, Mr. Bradley always knew where he was in relation to the basket, his opponents and the ball. And he had the moves to score or to find an open teammate.He has shown some of the same skills as a politician, winning election to the United States Senate and, now, commanding big money supporters in his Democratic primary challenge to Vice President Al Gore.
NEWS
By JILL ROSEN and JILL ROSEN,SUN REPORTER | October 7, 2005
Louise Gore, a Republican stalwart who was the first woman to run for statewide office in Maryland, died of cancer yesterday at a hospice in Washington. She was 80. The GOP nominee for governor in 1974, Miss Gore waged an unsuccessful campaign against Marvin Mandel. She had forged a political career in the state earlier, representing Montgomery County in the House of Delegates from 1963 to 1967, then serving a term in the state Senate. In 1970, President Richard M. Nixon appointed Miss Gore U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization in Paris.
NEWS
December 15, 2000
Pro-Gore letters again underscore The Sun's bias On Dec. 14, the very day after Vice President Al Gore conceded and called for the nation to come together, I was appalled to see The Sun print so many letters promoting divisiveness by writers blindly loyal to the Democratic Party. President-elect George W. Bush was elected by the people; those who voted for him were not bribed with cigarettes, stirred up by race-baiting reverends or misinformed by the pro-Gore media. I will not be surprised when Mr. Bush is inaugurated for his second term in 2005.
NEWS
December 14, 2000
The Constitution assigns no tasks to presidential candidates who lose. Their only obligation, required by the workings of democracy, is to admit that someone else has won. The losers of recent contests have promised to remain active in politics, but then almost disappeared from view (Michael S. Dukakis); or pledged to "sit back," but then stayed involved in party politics (Bob Dole). Their predictions for themselves have proved notoriously unreliable. No candidate in the past 125 years has been required to wait as long as Vice President Al Gore to learn an unfavorable outcome - 35 days - without a victory to make up for the long wait.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | November 15, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Within the political community, the sky is falling. Or, at least, so it would seem from the wringing of hands and gnashing of teeth. There is talk of a constitutional crisis if we don't certify a president soon. Among the voters, however, there is a remarkable equanimity. There are now four opinion surveys that find most Americans far from alarmed by the uncertainty. They want the choice of Vice President Al Gore or Gov. George W. Bush to be made by counting the votes in Florida, not in the courts or endless recounts elsewhere.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 11, 2000
WASHINGTON - "The hard-core Democrats all say go for it," Duane Hammond said, "and the Republicans are saying it's all sour grapes, so call it off and don't bring on a constitutional crisis." Hammond, who runs an advertising business in New Hampshire, was reporting on what he hears from his neighbors and fellow members of the Rotary Club. As for himself, he would like to see a middle course - pursuing a court decision on whether the Palm Beach County vote should be cast again, and then accepting the returns on the Florida vote as they become final next week.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 31, 2000
WASHINGTON - Eight current or former Secret Service agents who are black charged yesterday that top officials are dragging their feet on ridding the agency of deep-rooted racial discrimination, which they said has also infected Vice President Al Gore's protective detail. The group, part of the 38 black agents who have filed sworn declarations in federal court, appealed to Gore for help in getting the service to sit down with them to discuss a class-action lawsuit they and others filed in May. "These problems go back 27 years and more," said John P. Relman, an attorney representing the agents.
NEWS
By JULES WITCOVER | June 11, 2006
Former vice president is no General ShermanWASHINGTON -- Nobody has done more to bring Civil War Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman back into the news lately than former Vice President Al Gore, simply by saying he's not going to repeat the general's famous rejection of interest in the presidency. On the ABC News talk show last Sunday, Gore said he has "no plans" to run in 2008 and doesn't "expect to ever be a candidate for president again," but that he sees no reason to voice Sherman's observation that, "if nominated I will not run; if elected I will not serve."
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | December 22, 1993
Vice President Al Gore said yesterday that the Clinton administration endorses the "basic principles" of several telecommunications bills pending on Capitol Hill but still will unveil its own legislative package rewriting the Communications Act of 1934 early next year.The vice president told the National Press Club in Washington that the administration's approach would strike a balance between the private sector's desire for deregulation and the public's interest in broad access to the developing national information infrastructure.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | July 26, 2000
WASHINGTON - No one who understands politics will believe the choice of Richard B. Cheney as his running mate will make any significant difference in George W. Bush's chances of winning the presidency in November. The evidence is clear that Americans vote for a president rather than a vice president. There are, nonetheless, some strongly positive aspects of the decision by the Texas governor. The most significant is that Mr. Cheney is a politically safe and politically conventional selection made by a presidential candidate who is playing safe, conventional politics.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | July 19, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The decision of the Bush and Gore campaigns to hit the road immediately after their parties' nominating conventions reflects an obvious hope that the magic of the Clinton-Gore bus trip of 1992, coming right out of the New York convention that anointed that ticket, can be successfully replicated. Gov. George W. Bush is slated to revive the old whistle stop train tradition at the conclusion of the Republican convention in Philadelphia Aug. 3, chugging across the Midwest, which is expected to be the key battleground this fall, as well as in California, where he hopes to upset Vice President Al Gore, or at least force him to spend time and money.
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