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NEWS
November 6, 2011
Today, The Sun can refer with pride to "Baltimore's venerable landmark Bromo Seltzer Tower," but it wasn't always so. As recently as 1971, the city of Baltimore saw the tower as an eyesore destined for demolition. Why does the tower still stand? For that you can thank historic preservation, the National Register and the Maryland Historical Trust, which stood up for the tower's preservation to former Mayor William Donald Schaefer. (Years later, of course, Schaefer too became an avid preservationist.)
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
In one of the city's first historic preservation battles, Baltimore residents paid $17,000 in 1924 to save the soaring Phoenix Shot Tower from a wrecking ball and a future as a Union Oil Company gas station. Today, preservationists are again rallying around the Shot Tower. While it is no longer in danger - the city has abandoned a 2012 proposal to consider selling more than a dozen historic properties, including the tower - they say more needs to be done to showcase the attraction and to fully restore what was once the nation's tallest building.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2010
Hoping to influence discussion of a new 10-year General Plan, Howard County preservationists have issued a new list of endangered historic sites. Two new sites are on the list this year, including the Ellicott City Historic District, which the group says is facing development pressures that threaten the integrity of the old river mill town. "They're chipping away at the edges of the district," said Mary Catherine Cochran, vice president of Preservation Howard County, which issues the annual list to draw attention to the fast-growing county's past.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2013
The Baltimore-born author Justin Kramon's supporting characters are so quirky and funny, you'd swear they were drawn from real life. There's the landfill operator who shows a visitor a photograph of a hatchet-faced woman in her 60s and then complains that no one understands the burden of having a pretty wife. And there's the big-bellied, bearded lodge owner who's secretly addicted to online shopping. But the 33-year-old Kramon, who will read Tuesday at the Ivy Bookshop from his second novel, "The Preservationist," swears that he invented every oddball character.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1996
When Owings Mills developer Howard Brown reflects on the criticism that dogged him for bulldozing the 18th century Samuel Owings House, he cites a parable passed on by his business mentor."
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1997
State Department of Environment officials have asked the Maryland Historical Trust to help determine whether the digging for a golf course and country club at Hayfields Farm should be stopped while a historic-impact study is conducted.Dane S. Bauer, deputy director of the department's Water Management Agency, said the issue is complicated by the question of whether historic impact must be considered in issuing a storm-water control permit, such as the one that has allowed the digging.Bauer said he will ask the state attorney general's office to make that determination.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | April 2, 2008
The reprieve was short-lived. Preservationists who had hoped to save a row of buildings next to the old St. Stanislaus Kostka Roman Catholic Church in Fells Point watched helplessly yesterday as a wrecking crew, armed with freshly granted approval from the city, began taking apart one of the structures. Last week, the workers were forced to postpone the demolition when told by City Councilman James B. Kraft that they lacked official approval of their plan to stabilize an 18th-century mansion that the preservationists hope will remain standing after the buildings on either side of it have been torn down.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2001
The battle over the future of Memorial Stadium appears to be over, after the group seeking to save it from a wrecking ball gave up the fight yesterday. Preservation Maryland, a nonprofit organization, was to appeal the demolition permit at an administrative hearing yesterday but decided against it because even a ruling in the group's favor would likely result in only a short delay of the project, said Tyler Gearhart, the group's executive director. "I think we have exhausted all those legal avenues," Gearhart said.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1997
As Wal-Mart prepares to break ground for a store near Dundalk, preservationists are pressuring the company to allow an archaeological survey of the property -- the site of British and American activity during the Battle of North Point in 1814.The 11th-hour request -- the latest in a series of skirmishes between developers and Baltimore County preservationists -- stems from local historians' realization that a rambling white house earmarked for the retail store's parking lot could contain a historic tavern.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2002
Sheppard Pratt Health System officials say they will introduce development plans in coming weeks to substantially preserve some of the structures they fought to keep off Baltimore County's list of historic landmarks. Local preservationists fought to put 13 buildings and other structures from the institution's 111-year-old campus on the landmarks list, but last week, the Baltimore County Council voted to leave four of them off. Council members said they were concerned that the restrictions that come with landmark designation would prevent the hospital from modernizing and expanding.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2012
Karen Lewand, a preservationist and educator who launched a series of walking tours while establishing programs for children to learn about architecture, died of cancer Dec. 20 at her home in the Radnor-Winston section of North Baltimore. She was 67. "She was an innovator, a leader and a strong advocate for preserving Baltimore's historic buildings and neighborhoods, and helped Baltimore grow in countless ways. With an unwavering voice for preserving the best of our architecture and neighborhoods, she was instrumental in saving historic places that many of us now take for granted," said Johns Hopkins, executive director of Baltimore Heritage.
NEWS
September 21, 2012
Robert Moses told Baltimore to put a highway through Mount Vernon Square. Aren't you glad Baltimore did not listen? William Donald Schaefer and every public official in Maryland wanted to put an interstate highway through Fell's Point that would have run inches from the Fish Market, the Power Plant, the Shot Tower and the Carroll Mansion. Aren't you glad preservationists (and the National Historic Preservation Act) said "no?" Isn't a revitalized Inner Harbor East better? Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake: Save the Morris Mechanic Theatre.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
- The fighting that killed or wounded 21,000 Americans in the rolling hills of Western Maryland was over in about 12 grisly hours. But a century and a half after the bloodiest day in American military history, the struggle to preserve the ground where Union and Confederate soldiers fought the Battle of Antietam only now appears close to a declaration of victory. As Americans gather to honor the sacrifice of those who fell on Sept. 17, 1862 - as they will do this weekend and Monday on the 150th anniversary - they will do so at one of the nation's best-preserved Civil War sites.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
Members of Baltimore's historic preservation commission have been summoned to a closed-door meeting Monday at which, some preservationists say, the board members will be asked to oust the commission's director. Board members and preservationists say efforts are under way to remove Kathleen Kotarba, who has served for decades as the executive director of the Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation. "We heard from multiple folks that the closed session was going to be to take a vote to fire Kathleen Kotarba," said Eli Pousson, field officer for Baltimore Heritage, a nonprofit group that closely monitors the commission.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2012
William Boulton "Bo" Kelly Jr., the Baltimore architect, preservationist and raconteur, led a study in the late 1970s of the Washington Monument, the first civic monument erected to the nation's first president, and perhaps the most emblematic symbol of the city. Kelly died this month at the age of 84 and didn't see the completion of the latest overhaul of the monument, which is currently closed. Kelly had developed a solid reputation as a preservationist when he helped establish Baltimore Heritage in 1960 and, four years later, the Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation, serving as its first chairman.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
William Boulton "Bo" Kelly Jr., a Baltimore architect, preservationist and civic leader who founded Baltimore Heritage and helped establish the Baltimore's Commission for Historical & Architectural Preservation, died Wednesday at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson of complications from an infection. The longtime Ruxton resident was 84. "Bo was a person who had an indomitable spirit and was also one of those wonderful characters you meet in life," said Walter G. Schamu, a partner in the firm of Schamu, Machowski, Grego Architects and a longtime friend.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | June 21, 2006
A simmering controversy over a proposed office building next to the historic Woodlawn Manor in Columbia is now a fierce fight between a developer and preservationists -- with Howard County Council members in the middle. The focal point of the clash is a bill that would allow office buildings or their parking lots to be 10 feet from open space or multifamily developments instead of 30 feet, which is the current standard. If the bill passes, it would apply countywide, though the current argument is over one project.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2000
While workers shear and torch the heaping metal remains of the imploded National Tower at Gettysburg, preservationists who once fought for its dismantling are selling bolts, light bulbs and signs - souvenirs from the tower - as a fund-raiser. This is the last piece of an aggressive, quarter-century-long campaign by preservationists to acquire and destroy the tower they said desecrated the site of the Battle of Gettysburg, regarded by many historians as the pivotal contest of the Civil War. "Our members felt this was a significant piece of the victory, " said Vickey Monrean, surveying a shelf in her office storage room lined with pieces of the 393-foot tower, which was destroyed July 3 before thousands of spectators.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
They peeled the facade off the old Forest Diner on U.S. 40 in Ellicott City, revealing an American classic. Stainless steel, glass, and compact as a caboose, the restaurant's original core from about 1950 sits in a vacant dirt-and-gravel lot behind a chain-link fence. "I wish it was gone because it looks so sad sitting there," says Barbara Carroll, who worked at the diner as a waitress, then hostess, for 43 years - from 1969 to the end of May, when the last meal was served. Now, from her spot at the hostess stand at Jilly's Bar & Grill across Baltimore National Pike, she cannot see the place, but she can recount the details from memory: about 20 red stools at the counter, the original six booths.
NEWS
March 26, 2012
News that Baltimore officials are considering selling or leasing as many as 16 of the city's historic landmarks - including the iconic Shot Tower and the War Memorial Building - has sparked alarm and outrage among people who fear allowing them to fall into private hands could lead to the loss of a priceless historical legacy. No one wants to see these magnificent architectural gems turned into fast-food emporiums or low-end strip malls. But if the city handles the matter carefully, at least some of them could be transferred in a way that ensures they will be well cared for and preserved for future generations.
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