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ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | July 25, 1999
Mission: To promote and emphasize the historical and architectural significance of Federal Hill and Fells Point; to foster further preservation of the communities' architectural heritage and historic legacy; and to ensure that present and future development within the area is compatible and worthy of inclusion in a historic district. The Preservation Society restored, maintains and operates the 18th-century Robert Long House and Garden as a museum at 812 S. Ann St. -- the oldest surviving urban residence in Baltimore.
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TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
An authentic Indiana Jones is alive and well, right here in town. Baltimore, meet Douglas Comer. Operating rather inconspicuously from his Charles Village-based firm Cultural Site Research and Management, Comer has overseen some of the region's most important archaeological and historical preservation projects. That's when he's not spur-of-the-moment globetrotting to a newly discovered archaeology site or to play watchdog over the preservation of some of the Earth's most-treasured archaeological finds.
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NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | October 29, 2006
About 200 years ago, a two-story Federal-style mansion was built in Essex. Many years later, although little was known about the structure, Baltimore County purchased the land surrounding it and announced the house would be torn down. In response, some local citizens headed to the state archives in Annapolis to learn more about the property. What they found was enough to save it from destruction. "During a title search, the land the house stands on was erroneously identified as the property of George Washington's great-grandfather," said Michael Bosse, 47, who became the curator of the house about a decade ago. "As it turns out, that house was on the adjoining land."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2011
This year, Woodberry Kitchen is selling a select group of "Preservation Society" items, spices, sauces and preserves that are prepared for the restaurant. The selection includes hot sauce, Cybee's honey and fish pepper and espelette sauces as well as Counter Culture coffee and Woodberry Kitchen T-shirts. The goods are available for sale at Woodberry Kitchen on weekdays from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. So are attractively designed Woodberry Kitchen gift certificates, which you can also purchase by calling the restaurant 410-464-8000 or online at woodberrykitchen.com .  
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt | November 19, 1995
A roundup of new products and servicesGreat GroutOf course you want your house to look perfect the holiday-entertaining season, but do you really want to waste precious hours replacing stained grouting between tiles? Certainly not. So check out Brookstone's roll-on grout whitener for $11.50. Applied with a small applicator wheel, the whitener dries in 24 hours. Look for it at stores in the retail chain, or call (800) 926-7000.Original OrnamentsWhat's the Christmas season without the purchase of a few new holiday ornaments?
FEATURES
By Boston Globe | November 25, 1990
For the first time, the Newport, R.I., mansion the Breakers will be open to the public in December. The Marble House also will continue its tradition of having a poinsettia "tree" in its Gold Ballroom.The houses will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 1-9, 15-16, 22-23 and 26-30. All the houses of the Preservation Society of Newport County will be lit from dusk to 11 p.m. throughout December.Among events planned by the society are "A Vanderbilt Christmas" at the Breakers, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, with the home decorated in a manner reminiscent of the Gilded Age. There will be music and drink.
NEWS
By RUSS MULLALY | July 8, 1992
I have been witness to one of the sadder incidents in this county's history. It is an incident that shows that the dollar is more sacred than anything else to some people. I am referring to the desecration of St. Mary's Cemetery in Ellicott City.The 3.2-acre site, which was purchased by a developer for $60,000, is to have two homes in the $250,000 range built on it. The developer of this property is Allen Becker, who also is the chief executive officer of Chesapeake Federal Savings and Loan.
FEATURES
August 9, 1992
August Court Days hark back to the late 1700s, when the Judicial Court was in session and townsfolk and those living in the surrounding countryside made it an occasion for merrymaking.A re-creation of those days will take place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. LTC Saturday and next Sunday in Leesburg, Va. There will be re-enactments of events of 200 years ago, including the re-election of President George Washington in 1792. The town ++ will be filled with merchants, roving musicians, mimes, militia and marching bands.
FEATURES
By Kathleen Shull and Kathleen Shull,Special to The Evening Sun | November 10, 1990
Like the real thing of years past, the model steam trains at Leakin Park round a bend with wailing whistles and the bitter aroma of coal steam. Clickety-clacks and a screeching stop are comforting sounds to those who love the arrival as much as the ride. So is the conductor's firm announcement: All Aboard!The only surprise is that these trains are knee-high to the passengers.They're not toys, though. The men of the Chesapeake & Allegheny Steam Preservation Society have worked for years in machine shops and garages to create exact replicas of past great trains.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kristin Gray and Kristin Gray,Sun Reporter | October 5, 2006
In Fells Point, walking down cobblestone roads amid quaint boutiques is an effortless excursion into the past. The rapid pace of modern life converges with the city's simpler days to create a unique, colorful community. At the 40th annual Fells Point Fun Festival this weekend, thousands of people will revel as this waterfront neighborhood bustles with live music, art, carnival rides and cultural expression. The list of events scheduled for the two-day celebration includes an international bazaar featuring more than 300 retailers and free ethnic dance lessons.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | March 3, 2009
John Thomas Yuhanick, who founded a public relations and event business, died of cancer Friday at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The Guilford resident was 59. Born in Salem, Ohio, he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree at St. Louis University and moved in the early 1970s to Baltimore, where he worked as a Sun advertising representative. He sold ads related to the travel industry and remained an indefatigable traveler throughout his life, often visiting another country every two months.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | October 29, 2006
About 200 years ago, a two-story Federal-style mansion was built in Essex. Many years later, although little was known about the structure, Baltimore County purchased the land surrounding it and announced the house would be torn down. In response, some local citizens headed to the state archives in Annapolis to learn more about the property. What they found was enough to save it from destruction. "During a title search, the land the house stands on was erroneously identified as the property of George Washington's great-grandfather," said Michael Bosse, 47, who became the curator of the house about a decade ago. "As it turns out, that house was on the adjoining land."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kristin Gray and Kristin Gray,Sun Reporter | October 5, 2006
In Fells Point, walking down cobblestone roads amid quaint boutiques is an effortless excursion into the past. The rapid pace of modern life converges with the city's simpler days to create a unique, colorful community. At the 40th annual Fells Point Fun Festival this weekend, thousands of people will revel as this waterfront neighborhood bustles with live music, art, carnival rides and cultural expression. The list of events scheduled for the two-day celebration includes an international bazaar featuring more than 300 retailers and free ethnic dance lessons.
NEWS
By BRENT JONES and BRENT JONES,SUN REPORTER | July 25, 2006
The remaining portion of a rectory near an old church in Fells Point was demolished yesterday, a move that brings a developer a step closer to building high-priced condominiums on the property. The rectory was the first of several buildings slated to be razed as part of a redevelopment project at the site of the old St. Stanislaus Kostka Roman Catholic Church complex at Ann and Aliceanna streets. Opponents of the project say the buildings should be preserved because they are part of the heritage of the neighborhood's Polish community.
TRAVEL
July 31, 2005
Catering to Kids Newport mansion tours keep things interesting for young visitors As tour groups filter through the Breakers in Newport, R.I., the opulent oceanside mansion once used as the Vanderbilt family's summer home, a guide brings a Connecticut family of four into a spectacular room off the main entrance. The Great Hall is 50 feet high with red-carpeted staircases and a gilded plaster frame that borders a bright blue sky painted on the ceiling. Tour guide Nell Trainor lets the Chan family take in the view, then turns to the youngest members of the group -- Alissa, 9, and her 14-year-old sister, Queenie.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2005
An 18th-century Carroll County landmark will be the main attraction when more than 200 preservationists and others fascinated with old mills gather in Westminster this year. When the Society for the Preservation of Old Mills holds its annual conference in Maryland for the first time this September, members from across the United States and Canada will focus upon one of Maryland's gems: the Union Mills Homestead. Half a dozen volunteers, who worked more than a year to bring the conference to Carroll County, are busy planning events at Union Mills and visits to other mills in the area -- part of a region once known as America's breadbasket.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2004
From Fort McHenry to the old Shot Tower, Baltimore abounds with monuments and historic buildings. And though these sites are definitive reminders of the city's past, there are other spots where history comes alive, said Preservation Society Executive Director Ellen von Karajan. The trendy neighborhood of Fells Point, she noted, still echoes the tales of yesteryear. "Most people just don't realize ... what a very richly historic place Fells Point really is," she said. "There is so much here that just isn't known, even by Baltimoreans."
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1995
The two-story building in Fells Point was constructed in the mid-1800s as a barn for horse-drawn trolleys. A century later, it had become a rope and twine works. Now it's home for the Daily Grind coffeehouse and the Orpheum Theatre.By 1998, if all goes according to plan, it will house a public attraction befitting its prime waterfront location -- a new home for the Maryland Historical Society's Radcliffe Maritime Museum.The society has made a tentative commitment -- possibly permitting the coffeehouse and theater to remain -- to lease part of the old trolley barn at 1724-26 Thames St. and an adjacent property to house its collection of maritime art and artifacts, now in the basement of its headquarters at 201 W. Monument St.Assembled over the past 40 years and named for a former Maryland senator, George M. Radcliffe, the collection contains a vast and valuable array of ship's paintings and drawings, ship's models and other objects related to Maryland's maritime history.
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2005
After spending years in limbo, Mother Goose, Papa Bear and Cinderella's mice finally got their happy ending yesterday along with several other fairy-tale figures. Left over from the long-closed Enchanted Forest theme park, the wooden and fiberglass characters had languished behind a chain-link fence in Ellicott City, beaten by the weather and vandals. This week, the company that owns the land announced it would donate the park's fairy-tale figures so they could entertain children at a nearby farm.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2004
From Fort McHenry to the old Shot Tower, Baltimore abounds with monuments and historic buildings. And though these sites are definitive reminders of the city's past, there are other spots where history comes alive, said Preservation Society Executive Director Ellen von Karajan. The trendy neighborhood of Fells Point, she noted, still echoes the tales of yesteryear. "Most people just don't realize ... what a very richly historic place Fells Point really is," she said. "There is so much here that just isn't known, even by Baltimoreans."
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