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NEWS
November 30, 2011
In a recent story on immigration, The Sun reported a statement by Democratic Rep. Donna F. Edwards that we "must focus on those posing an actual threat to our communities" ("Hoping for reprieve: Md. immigrants await new policy," Nov. 18). Regarding the upcoming pilot program in Baltimore and Denver, will DUI convictions be included? They should be considered a violent crime. Will fingerprints be run to see if any crimes have been committed under an assumed name? Being a gang member is not a crime, but how many gang members are going to be cleared by this pilot program?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Cheryl Phillips | August 13, 2012
Federal officials are working to place compassion at the center of how our nation aims to treat elderly patients suffering from dementia. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has announced that they'll coordinate an effort to dramatically reduce the use of antipsychotic drugs among dementia patients in nursing homes. The agency's plan acknowledges that these powerful pharmaceuticals are often overused - and represents a valuable first step toward improving the way we treat people with this condition.
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NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | March 19, 2007
As presidential candidates try to stake out an electable position on the war in Iraq, Americans are justified in wondering: Is it reality, or is it just politics? Can anyone's judgment be trusted during an election cycle? Some measure of comfort may be found in the dual reality that is Washington. What you see on TV isn't necessarily what you get away from the cameras. Off the set, honest discussions about Iraq and the war on terror have a different tone and content than one might expect based on the gibbering of talking heads.
NEWS
November 30, 2011
In a recent story on immigration, The Sun reported a statement by Democratic Rep. Donna F. Edwards that we "must focus on those posing an actual threat to our communities" ("Hoping for reprieve: Md. immigrants await new policy," Nov. 18). Regarding the upcoming pilot program in Baltimore and Denver, will DUI convictions be included? They should be considered a violent crime. Will fingerprints be run to see if any crimes have been committed under an assumed name? Being a gang member is not a crime, but how many gang members are going to be cleared by this pilot program?
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 4, 1999
WHEN KHALID Muhammad, the deposed Nation of Islam hatchet man, applied for a permit to hold another 2,000-screwball march today, New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani applied the "fool me once, shame on you/fool me twice, shame on me" adage.No way was Muhammad getting another permit to march this year, Giuliani declared. Not after last year's debacle when Muhammad exhorted marchers to engage in violence against police officers if they moved in to lawfully disperse the rally that was supposed to end at 4 p.m. Last year, Giuliani called Muhammad's event a "hate march" but -- contrary to most media reports -- granted a permit for it.Not so this year.
NEWS
April 29, 2002
Church too slow to help improve Washington Hill Thank you for The Sun's accurate and fair reporting on the ongoing attempts to have Bishop Franklin Showell and the First Apostolic Institutional Faith Church honor their many promises to rehabilitate a two-block area of blighted church-owned property in Washington Hill ("Church targeted in anti-blight effort," April 17). Bishop Showell has indicated that his church is being unfairly singled out. But while other areas of Washington Hill have been and continue to be successfully redeveloped, the church has a 20-year history of empty promises, unmet deadlines and unanswered correspondence.
NEWS
March 25, 2007
Who is better off after years of war? As we observed last week the fourth anniversary of the Iraq war, I think we should pause for a moment and ask the question candidate Ronald Reagan asked more than 25 years ago: Are you better off now than you were four years ago ("We won't go," editorial, March 21)? The answer may depend on whom you ask. Ask many of our troops who shouldered a disproportionate burden in this war. Ask the many who have returned home after multiple combat tours injured, maimed, overlooked and haunted by war. Or ask the relatively few families who have sacrificed and ask, if you could, all those troops who can no longer answer our questions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Special to the Sun | May 11, 2003
Serial detectives are having a strong year. The raffish Brit Peter Diamond; the cerebral Californian Alex Delaware; sexy, stoic Jack Reacher; the savagely noble Joe Pickett; Main Liner Amanda Pepper; and New England's proper Frances Pratt have all got new cases, and the result is a group of literate, hard-edged tales. This is good news for mystery readers. True wit is the hallmark of the classic British mystery, and Peter Lovesey delivers it, and a lot more, in The House Sitter (Soho Press Inc., 304 pages, $25)
NEWS
By Deepak Chopra | April 22, 2007
While listening to the flood of coverage about the shooting rampage at Virginia Tech, I caught a comment from an English professor, Lucinda Roy, who taught the student gunman. Ms. Roy spotted that Cho Seung-Hui was extremely disturbed. She had read his violent fantasies in English class, and although many others detected an isolated, withdrawn loner, she realized how serious the situation was. She feared that Mr. Cho was suicidal, and took steps to help him. In that regard, Ms. Roy was singular in her compassion.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | September 9, 2007
Takeover The Return of the Imperial Presidency and the Subversion of American Democracy By Charlie Savage Little, Brown and Company / 336 pages / $25.99 After Sept. 11, we've been told, everything changed. Civil liberties had to be balanced against personal safety and national security. Since information is power, government officials had to conduct some of their business in secret. And for the duration of "the war on terror," the president had to be free to act rapidly and resolutely, at home and abroad, unfettered by Congress and the courts.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | September 9, 2007
Takeover The Return of the Imperial Presidency and the Subversion of American Democracy By Charlie Savage Little, Brown and Company / 336 pages / $25.99 After Sept. 11, we've been told, everything changed. Civil liberties had to be balanced against personal safety and national security. Since information is power, government officials had to conduct some of their business in secret. And for the duration of "the war on terror," the president had to be free to act rapidly and resolutely, at home and abroad, unfettered by Congress and the courts.
NEWS
By Deepak Chopra | April 22, 2007
While listening to the flood of coverage about the shooting rampage at Virginia Tech, I caught a comment from an English professor, Lucinda Roy, who taught the student gunman. Ms. Roy spotted that Cho Seung-Hui was extremely disturbed. She had read his violent fantasies in English class, and although many others detected an isolated, withdrawn loner, she realized how serious the situation was. She feared that Mr. Cho was suicidal, and took steps to help him. In that regard, Ms. Roy was singular in her compassion.
NEWS
March 25, 2007
Who is better off after years of war? As we observed last week the fourth anniversary of the Iraq war, I think we should pause for a moment and ask the question candidate Ronald Reagan asked more than 25 years ago: Are you better off now than you were four years ago ("We won't go," editorial, March 21)? The answer may depend on whom you ask. Ask many of our troops who shouldered a disproportionate burden in this war. Ask the many who have returned home after multiple combat tours injured, maimed, overlooked and haunted by war. Or ask the relatively few families who have sacrificed and ask, if you could, all those troops who can no longer answer our questions.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | March 19, 2007
As presidential candidates try to stake out an electable position on the war in Iraq, Americans are justified in wondering: Is it reality, or is it just politics? Can anyone's judgment be trusted during an election cycle? Some measure of comfort may be found in the dual reality that is Washington. What you see on TV isn't necessarily what you get away from the cameras. Off the set, honest discussions about Iraq and the war on terror have a different tone and content than one might expect based on the gibbering of talking heads.
NEWS
By EILEEN SOSKIN and EILEEN SOSKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 26, 2006
Music is dangerous! Some individuals think that lyrics can brainwash people. Some individuals think that rock 'n' roll (and other kinds of pop music) can lead teenagers astray. The idea that music, or words or art can be subversive is hardly new -- the Greeks forbid the playing of music in certain modes (keys) to anyone other than military men. At 7:30 p.m. June 3 , the Columbia Orchestra, in its last concert of the season, will perform a program with the theme "Clear and Present Danger," presenting two pieces whose subtexts reflect their cultures and transcend them: Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 25 and Shostakovich's Symphony No. 10. The concert will be held at Jim Rouse Theatre at Wilde Lake High School in Columbia.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Special to the Sun | May 11, 2003
Serial detectives are having a strong year. The raffish Brit Peter Diamond; the cerebral Californian Alex Delaware; sexy, stoic Jack Reacher; the savagely noble Joe Pickett; Main Liner Amanda Pepper; and New England's proper Frances Pratt have all got new cases, and the result is a group of literate, hard-edged tales. This is good news for mystery readers. True wit is the hallmark of the classic British mystery, and Peter Lovesey delivers it, and a lot more, in The House Sitter (Soho Press Inc., 304 pages, $25)
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | May 2, 1995
Q: I recently overheard a person say that children who have just been vaccinated should not be around people with cancer because children breathe out particles of the vaccines after they are injected. Is that true? My mother was treated for cancer about five years ago, and I have small children so I need to know.A: The simple answer to your question is "No, children don't breathe out the particles of vaccines they have been given." But the sense of your question deserves a more complicated answer.
NEWS
April 29, 2002
Church too slow to help improve Washington Hill Thank you for The Sun's accurate and fair reporting on the ongoing attempts to have Bishop Franklin Showell and the First Apostolic Institutional Faith Church honor their many promises to rehabilitate a two-block area of blighted church-owned property in Washington Hill ("Church targeted in anti-blight effort," April 17). Bishop Showell has indicated that his church is being unfairly singled out. But while other areas of Washington Hill have been and continue to be successfully redeveloped, the church has a 20-year history of empty promises, unmet deadlines and unanswered correspondence.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Erika Niedowski and Stephen Kiehl and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2001
In teams of three, firefighters wearing blue oxygen tanks prepared to go into the tunnel, following a path of light from a nearby truck's headlights. They put on black face masks as an extra precaution against possibly poisonous fumes. "We're gearing up, and bottling up," one shouted to the others. Minutes later, just before 10 p.m., they turned off the hose that had been pouring a steady stream of water into the south end of the railroad tunnel and started to head in. Asked if he was worried, one of the firefighters shrugged and said, "It's part of the job."
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